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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some here might hate the "diesel" but hopefully this will be useful for you too; I never touched a gasoline in my life (and I plan to keep it that way), so YMMV. Anyways, the diesel being the stronger breed of the 2 it has a problem that its interference, meaning that if timing is off enough the valves hit the piston. The problems I had with timing is that it was always some fraction of inch off, like this...

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I "invented" this method, cuz it doesnt feel good to run it like this even though it works, hope its useful for you.

1. Time the belt like all manuals say, haynes or whatever. Get it as close as possible. Keep tensioner tensioned, don't losen it.
2. Lock camshaft with lockingtool, now camshaft is in TDC
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3. Remove camshaft pulley, don't lock injectionpump.
-> Because nothing is holding injectionpump & crank, and camshaft is loosened, you can rotate now the timingbelt freely. But be careful, might hit valves, so don't use any tools with leverage. DO this instead:

4. Push the flywheel the slightly'est amount with a flathead, or even your finger works (make sure to pick a big one so it cant fall through the hole). There should be little resistance, you shouldn't need to push hard:
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5. Re-attach camshaft pulley and remove camshaft lock. Make sure crankshaft is still where it was. -> Now both crank & cam are timed.
6. Time pump like you normally would
7. Recheck everything is timed properly. I like to turn the engine by hand 2 times +- to see if it lines up after that
8. Done
 

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The screwdriver is a good idea, I'll give that a try next time I need to mess with the timing. Of course the diesels don't need to be timed very often, unlike those gas engines that need to time a spark with wear parts like plugs. 😉
 
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Hate? Such a strong word. There is no hate around here.

We just like jabbing each other about the gas vs diesel. All in good fun. At least, that is how I take it.

Just saying if my timing belt broke on the side of the road, I can replace it and drive home. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hate? Such a strong word. There is no hate around here.

We just like jabbing each other about the gas vs diesel. All in good fun. At least, that is how I take it.

Just saying if my timing belt broke on the side of the road, I can replace it and drive home. :)
Same here haha :D was waiting for you to see this post. Nice yeah, dont try that with a diesel haha
 

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I put it in fifth and grab the driver's side wheel,
then turn while looking down the hole to move the crank.
Usually with the car on the ground.
I like to have the marks line up while rolling forward so the slack in the belt is where it is while driving.

Then I'll break the cam sprocket loose and use the cam locker to turn the cam into alignment.
 
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