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Discussion Starter · #901 · (Edited)
Brendan, your premature bearing failure is a great example of why I milk OEM parts as long as possible. It's free and I don't seem to get burned any more doing that than I get burned by a bad aftermarket parts, or procedural errors (either by me or a shop).

I got the 14mm triple square and broke down the rest of the rear end:
Wood Auto part Metal Event Natural material

The wide aluminum bracket at the top of the photo will betray the rear transfer case when one looks at the back of the car, and it's the only thing that could possibly make the a$$ of a mk1 look any better.

The pile of nice rear end parts is quite small...
Writing implement Marker pen Office supplies Pen Paint


...and the piles of crusty rear end parts are quite large:
Wood Architecture Art Rectangle Flooring


Wood Auto part Art Metal Nut


The bump stops are shot and they're NLA, which is fine because they're a ishtty design:
Brown Wood Gas Circle Metal


Mine are nicer:
Household hardware Wood Gas Fastener Auto part

I cut down normal bump stops. There are two ridges inside that snap authoritatively onto the bolt flange and onto the collared washer, and the lower end of the spring pops onto the outer ridge in the rubber nice and tight.

The bolt will thread into the lower spring perch when the M12 tap gets here:
Brown Wood Auto part Metal Brick

Note how much rust sheds from the parts just handling them. Ugh.

The rear brake lines are unique and I could only find one side listing where the photo looked remotely like what I have, so I'll try to rehab the other side.

M12x1.5 tap, fasteners, paint, evaporust, brake hoses, wheel speed sensors, rotors, pads, 11465/2328
 

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'81 Scirocco Mid-Engine 24V VR6 AWD PHEV
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I'm going to highly suggest going with an aftermarket set of rear links. These are the ones I used on my TT: Gruvenparts
1) the stock links are weak, and can buckle/bend. Add a bunch of pitting from rust and it gets worse.
2) they're not adjustable at all, so no way to set camber. You might want a bit of camber adjustment to fine-tune the tire to fender placement or handling
 

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Discussion Starter · #903 ·
Scott used to make them for a race shop. He told me the moving outer joints would freeze up and strain the stock arms, causing them to fracture. The joints on this car still move freely, but he's talking about making me a set (which for him would cost pennies).

I tried Evaporust. It's a "chelator" and it won't affect skin, clothes, rubber, bearings, or intact steel, so it'll work on the assembled knuckles and swing arms. It takes a while and having enough solution to submerge the parts isn't cheap (get it? solution?), but get a load of these brackets that normally I would blast:
Gesture Artifact Font Automotive tire Art


Gas Household hardware Font Auto part Metal

These looked like they were made of brown Corn Flakes before. I chipped the flakes off after soaking and ran the parts on a wire wheel. The areas that never rusted aren't pitted, as can happen with electrolysis or acid, and there's no blast media to get into the bearings. l also don't need to relinquish my parts.

Piece by piece, the pile of nice parts is slooooowly growing:
Wood Tool Metal Audio equipment Electronic instrument


Window Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood


Scott replaced the O2 bung:
Wood Gas Composite material Automotive exterior Bumper


He also got a V-clamp for the exhaust stump at the rear of the car, because I don't have the final muffler decided:
Nickel Automotive wheel system Jewellery Rim Automotive lighting

This way I can try different options for best fitment, sound, etc...

11465/2334
 

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Scott used to make them for a race shop. He told me the moving outer joints would freeze up and strain the stock arms, causing them to fracture. The joints on this car still move freely, but he's talking about making me a set (which for him would cost pennies).

I tried Evaporust. It's a "chelator" and it won't affect skin, clothes, rubber, bearings, or intact steel, so it'll work on the assembled knuckles and swing arms. It takes a while and having enough solution to submerge the parts isn't cheap (get it? solution?), but get a load of these brackets that normally I would blast:
View attachment 132982

View attachment 132983
These looked like they were made of brown Corn Flakes before. I chipped the flakes off after soaking and ran the parts on a wire wheel. The areas that never rusted aren't pitted, as can happen with electrolysis or acid, and there's no blast media to get into the bearings. l also don't need to relinquish my parts.



11465/2334
These look great! I'm always skeptical of these types of things, and I love a post like this that shows real results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #906 ·
I soaked them a total of about 18 hours, removing them periodically to chip and wire wheel anything loose. It's not magic, but it's good for this situation where dissassembly of bearings isn't warranted.

Modified/beefier bump stops:
White Light Musical instrument Gas Bell

I'll fill them with urethane when I install the suspension.

Rear dust shields:
Wood Hardwood Wood stain Auto part Plywood

Here's the weird rear brake line I can't find:
Wood Beige Twig Wire Flooring

I found the other side but I had to rehab this one.

Soaking caliper and carrier parts:
Drinkware Dishware Ingredient Wood Serveware

They'll hopefully be clean tomorrow.

The solid A3 rear rotors arrived and they don't fit so I'm back to the huge 256mm vented TT rear rotors. I'll need to mill down semi-metallic asbestos-free pads so the brakes don't touch the wheels. I don't want spacers because the car is already wider than I prefer.

I bought a 5 gallon bucket of Evaporust to submerge the knuckles, 11565/2334
 

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Discussion Starter · #907 ·
Rear carriers and front pistons after soaking and wire wheel/welding brush:
Wood Household hardware Bicycle part Tool Gas

These aren't painted or blasted. The recess in the pistons even looks good where the wire wheel can't get in.

I'm soaking the front caliper castings today, hopefully finish them tomorrow:
Liquid Fluid Rectangle Bottle Gas


The few parts I've shown have weakened the solution already, so now I'm hitting parts with a porcupine wheel before soaking, so the loosest stuff gets knocked off and reduce the expense. I used brake cleaner first, just in case there's asbestos. Someone told me that's it's illegal to make things with asbestos in the U.S. but it's not illegal to sell things made elsewhere with asbestos. If that's true, that's bullisht.


11565/2340
 

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The way the law is written, it's against the law for a car manufacturer to use asbestos. The law does not mention anything about brake manufacturers.

Of course, this was years ago. Anything could have changed. I remember engineers opening their brief case handing 'special' brake pads that would solve a clients brake noises. It worked every time.

Right now, copper is being phased out of brake pads in Washington state. The way my state is going, brake pads will be illegal in cars/trucks and more stop signs will be built.
 

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Great job again Eric! I used ERust on many parts on my M81 and it works very well for what it is. I would first knock the heavy loose rust off, then brake-kleen (which for me causes sore throat issues and sleeplessness when inhaled even the "green" labeled kind so be careful with it), soak 4-12 hours, brass wire wheel, final soak 4 hours. Then I filter the now dirty ERust through a paper towel 2x. This helps the Evaporust last longer as the rust munching critters in it lose their effectiveness from sitting with rust too long. I was able to save many unavailable parts this way including a frozen brake combination/proportioning valve. They say it doesn't affect wiring or plastic but I haven't tried soaking a distributor or the like yet. You? They also say it's ok on your skin but I always use gloves just in case so those critters don't end up munching my insides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #911 ·
The gallon I bought is spent; the front calipers soaked overnight and they didn't come out near as nice as previous items:
Auto part Machine Composite material Metal Fashion accessory

This is after rinsing in a sink with a toothbrush. There's still rust in the tight areas.

Here they are after a few hours beating them up:
Jaw Bone Art Wood Auto part


Auto part Metal Fashion accessory Automotive exterior Motor vehicle


Painted:
Grey Font Artifact Auto part Metal


Metal Auto part Font Slide sandal Monochrome photography

We'll see how the 5 gallon bucket of Evaporust works on the knuckles and swing arms, but in the future I'll probably go back to mechanical rust removal. I could see how the stuff would be perfect for inaccessible areas like inside gas tanks.

The rear calipers are aluminum and they cleaned up much easier:
Gas Auto part Nickel Composite material Metal

I used acid and a brass welding brush on the handbrake hardware, and the brass stained the steel so it looks just like cad plating, lol.

Now we're getting somewhere...
Wood Gas Table Hardwood Metal


...slowly:
Wood Art Gas Artifact Hardwood


This swing arm bracket is just... ugh:
Brown Wood Font Gas Metal


Paint and return shipping on the A3 rotors, 11585/2346
 

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Discussion Starter · #913 ·
I don't know the car's history. It has 100K miles so the mechanicals don't need much, but IMO the rot would have forced it into a junk yard within a few years. I'm still working out a large-scale blasting plan for the expensive suspension parts, I'm not sure how that'll play out.

All the little bits are ready to go, though:
Gas Auto part Metal Machine Wood

Based on the absurd size of the rotors, braking should be adequate, lol.

Haldex unit being cleaned up:
Household appliance accessory Gas Machine Creative arts Auto part


I crudely ground the drive flange lips so things stay reasonably balanced:
Automotive tire Bicycle part Metalworking Motor vehicle Rim

Be kind: the CVs still fit tight and I had to grind slots into which I can tap a screw driver to pop things apart. I might get new flanges but have my brother-in-law mill the lips down a little because while these will work, they do look awful.

New Haldex ground strap, 11595/2352
 

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Right now, copper is being phased out of brake pads in Washington state. The way my state is going, brake pads will be illegal in cars/trucks and more stop signs will be built.
THAT. Is funny.

The way "our" state is going, we won't have any cops left to enforce the stop signs, so who needs brakes?

Well done Eric - this project I will have to see someday!
 

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Discussion Starter · #915 · (Edited)
Hi Craig! wave

Haldex today; it's probably due for service but full dissassembly is out of the question at this mileage, sooooo...

Cleaned with brass brushes, taped, painted and detailed:
Chair Table Automotive tire Gas Engineering


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Gas Engineering Machine tool

I did the bottom on my back as best I could to avoid spilling oil out of the top vents. The drive flanges look like a$$ but they'll be way under the car :sneaky:. They're fastened from inside the housing anyways, so they stay until first rebuild. If they vibrate, that would unfortunately force a rebuild...

Edit:
At 12:05 this guy's inner CV joints are also frozen to the drive flanges. WTF? There's no excuse for this on a car whose AWD system is going to be used in snow, and will therefore see salt. Now I'm of a mind that my ugly flanges are better than OEM; and least they'll release the CV joints when they're supposed to.

More brass brushes, 11610/2358
 

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I had a set of wheels rebuilt for a good client of mine. One of them had to be welded on the inside [looked good to me]. He mentioned only the bicyclist would see it. I suspect the same with your flanges.
 

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Hi Craig! wave

Haldex today; it's probably due for service but full dissassembly is out of the question at this mileage, sooooo...

Edit:
At 12:05 this guy's inner CV joints are also frozen to the drive flanges. WTF? There's no excuse for this on a car whose AWD system is going to be used in snow, and will therefore see salt. Now I'm of a mind that my ugly flanges are better than OEM; and least they'll release the CV joints when they're supposed to.
Hi Eric! Haldex looks great - as expected........

Just wanted to chime in that my Milwaukee impact gun (shown in the video) is my favorite tool. Got it for Christmas from my girls a couple of years ago. The next time I had to move my upright compressor - I decided to sell it instead. I do not anticipate painting a car in this lifetime.

I have since added the 12V extended ratchet wrench - another go to tool. Makes things SO much faster.

Just in case the fam needs some ideas for dad for Christmas!! ; )

Carry on..........
 

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Discussion Starter · #918 · (Edited)
I don't have battery-powered tools yet but lipos are always getting better and I might turn to the dark side. As for the drive flanges, I've rationalized them adequately.

I don't have access yet to heavy-duty blasting equipment so I'll just plug along here in case that doesn't pan out. A little bit each day won't be so bad, the pile looks big but it's "only" 16 parts. Well, 15 because I did that awful swing arm bracket.

Before:
Brown Wood Gas Font Metal


During:
Composite material Auto part Font Fashion accessory Metal


Jaw Wood Tool Artifact Auto part

(The color is staining on the steel from the interaction of brass brushes and the acid)

After:
Auto part Composite material Automotive exterior Bumper Household hardware



That'll do.

11610/2363
 

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Discussion Starter · #920 ·
the pile looks big but it's "only" 16 parts. Well, 15 because I did that awful swing arm bracket.
14:
Wood Auto part Gas Composite material Electric blue

(The other swing arm bracket).

13:
Sculpture Wood Household hardware Art Auto part


Gas Door Electric blue Metal Auto part

(Haldex bracket)

12:
Bicycle part Nickel Composite material Nut Bicycle drivetrain part

(Front caliper carrier)

This is filthy and tedious work so please pretend that these are interesting updates. Sequential posts like "oooh! I can't wait to see what 11 is!" will keep the wind in my sails, even if the words ring false because one could reasonably predict that 11 will be the other front caliper carrier.

11610/2369
 
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