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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello forum!

My daughter and I have decided to do a complete restoration of a 1980 MK1 Scirocco. I bought this off of ebay in 2019 and drove it for a bit but realized that it needed some major TLC. This was originally a California car so fortunately rust has not been too bad.

This thread is to document the teardown and (hopefully) restoration.

Currently, we are considering as close to a period correct restoration as possible depending on parts availability etc. Thought about engine swaps but right now thinking that we will rehab the original 1.6L. Open to suggestions, however.

Since this is the first time either of us has embarked on a project like this, any feedback or help from the forum would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
Joe

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This should be a fun thread. I so wanted a new '80 Scirocco upon graduation from college, but abandoned that dream at the Dealer when I saw the MSRP on the window sticker. I seem to recall that the one that I looked at was priced at near $9,000 (USD), nearly $30K in today's money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That looks rather clean. What kind of tlc does it need?

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The pictures are deceptive - it has a litany of issues:
  • After market paint job with a lot of pitted areas
  • Window moldings are all dried out and leak when it rains
  • Interior carpet is pretty worn
  • Heater doesnt work
  • AC doesnt work
  • Seat rails dont work
  • Tons of oil leaks
  • A lot of bad electric connectors
  • Broken vacuum lines
  • Body with a lot of mild to moderate rust
  • and the list goes on!

And with a manual transmission too. (y) So then do you have a factory service manual? Are frequently needed parts readily available? I'd be in over my head on Day 1 with something like this. :D
I have the Bentley Service Manual as well as a Chiltons guide and Haynes guide.
I have been taking a ton of pictures and videos as I have been disassembling so hopefully I will know how to put it back together....
 

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The pictures are deceptive - it has a litany of issues:
  • After market paint job with a lot of pitted areas
  • Window moldings are all dried out and leak when it rains
  • Interior carpet is pretty worn
  • Heater doesnt work
  • AC doesnt work
  • Seat rails dont work
  • Tons of oil leaks
  • A lot of bad electric connectors
  • Broken vacuum lines
  • Body with a lot of mild to moderate rust
  • and the list goes on!



I have the Bentley Service Manual as well as a Chiltons guide and Haynes guide.
I have been taking a ton of pictures and videos as I have been disassembling so hopefully I will know how to put it back together....
I wish mine had ac. Im currently restoring my 77 scirocco. Vintage rubber is the plqce to go for the window seals.

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Welcome to The Nuthouse!

Good on you for jumping in and getting to it while the car is still not too far gone. If it's your first time, know that there are some steps on these particular cars that can burn you; it wouldn't hurt for you to post every step of the way so we can give you a heads-up when trouble's coming.

As an example: when you repaint it, "glass out" is the best way, but beware the windshield because if you crack it...

If you're doing everything yourself also be aware that the necessary tools can be a significant portion of the overall budget. Just the large compressor to do the bodywork is over a grand and that's with none of the air-powered tools, the hose reel, etc... A decent MIG welder with accessories is another grand, and it's likely you'll need it because even without rot, these cars often have stress cracks on the unibody. Sadly, any work you farm out is even more expensive than the tools to do things yourself. I've never gotten out for less than $10,000, and I have almost every conceivable tool, many hoarded parts and nothing gets farmed out. Figure $20,000 if you're starting from scratch.

Ref. the engine: rehabbing the original will probably cost more than swapping in a good used 1.8. The 1.8 will be noticeably stronger in every way and depending which one you get, it's almost plug-n-play.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
echassin,
Thanks for your suggestions! My plan was to farm out the bodywork since I don't have the time, space, tools, or experience for everything that would be required to do the bodywork right. I have not gotten any quotes yet so based on how much shops are asking, that plan may change.

For the 1.8 engine, any sources that you might recommend?

Thanks!
Joe
 

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echassin,
Thanks for your suggestions! My plan was to farm out the bodywork since I don't have the time, space, tools, or experience for everything that would be required to do the bodywork right. I have not gotten any quotes yet so based on how much shops are asking, that plan may change.

For the 1.8 engine, any sources that you might recommend?

Thanks!
Joe
A 1.8l 16v from a mk2 would be nice in a mk1

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Agree with the 16V but a JH from an 83-85 car would be the easiest. The only hitch is the JH will only run two or three hundred thousand miles and then it'll be junk :p

If you want body work "done right" be prepared to re-mortgage the house and it still probably won't be done right.

It also won't be done in a timely fashion; they'll likely only work on your car when there's no collision work to do, which is almost never.
 

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I have a Scirocco 16V and agree. To do it "right" you would need to swap everything over from a Scirocco 16V which is everything fuel-related and that's just to start. You may be able to power it up, but that would not be plug and play. You'd have to have electrical experience to even attempt the electrics or steal all of the electrical stuff from a Scirocco 16V. Even then you'd have to cut and paste the body harness to use your original non-engine electrical stuff. (Two different fuse boxes which are not compatible is the main hassle.)

If you got the engine from a GTI 16V, GLI 16V or Passat 16V, that's a whole different electrical system. You'd also need to find a Scirocco 16V intake manifold and fuel injector lines. I don't know if they used CIS-E or CIS-Motronic or something else entirely.

You could of course run carbs or the CIS already in your Scirocco but the latter just further complicates matters. Carbs are easier to fit and you wouldn't need to wire in the Oxygen Sensor Control Unit (engine ECU).

With the original K-Jetronic CIS, you'd still need the Scirocco 16V fuel injector lines and the Scirocco 16V intake manifold. You'd have to machine the intake to take your old Auxiliary Air Regulator. You could mount the Warm Up Regulator in the original location but might have to re-rout the fuel lines. Some European Scirocco 16Vs came with CIS and there was a seller on eBay selling the whole systems brand new but that was a long time ago.

You'd still have to wire in the Knock Sensor Ignition system if you went with carbs or your original CIS. It communicated directly to the Oxygen Sensor Control Unit (engine ECU) and I don't know how well it gets along on its own.

USRT sells a kit to replace the ignition distributor with a Miata crank fired system but that's more complication. I think it still requires a knock sensor or some type of engine management system.

By far, the easiest way to change it to a 16V is to get a whole Scirocco 16V and steal everything from it, replacing any worn out stuff with new - then de-evolving the stuff that's not compatible with a Scirocco 1.

Or you could get a 1.8 8V engine that's already plug and play. I'm not up on the engine codes that are compatible but others here are well-versed on the subject.

Good luck.

-OE
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That is an amazing restoration - I wish I had those skills!

I'm going to have to give some serious thought about the changing the engine - I had planned on trying to stay fairly original but I am open to other ideas...

Picture after the engine was pulled:
112007


A triumphant selfie with dad and daughter!
112008


We took the intake manifold off prior to pulling it - that was definitely a PITA and would have been easier to do after pulling the engine....
 

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If I recall correctly, I pulled the head on my '78 before pulling the engine. Then I took the intake off. I replaced the '78 1.5 with a 1980 Rabbit 1.6. I think I installed it with the head removed and installed the head with the intake at the same time. This was around 1983 so my memory is a little fuzzy.

I don't know which engine is the best, but if you get a 1.8 from a Scirocco 1 it should fit.

Others can tell you which engines to avoid.

I think you want to avoid tall blocks but there may be ways to make them fit.

The JH should fit if Young Eric recommends it.

-OE
 

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@OE: the Scirocco 1 never came with the 1.8, but the JH is the 8 valver from a lot of the cars in the 83-85 range, so shortly after the Scirocco 1 stopped production.

The JH is not the most powerful option but it has advantages: it's the easiest for a first timer (it literally drops in and the only different part is the upper radiator hose), it adds 15-20hp, and it has no known faults that reduce its longevity.
 

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Agreed. I have a 2H running CIS and it gives about 5-10 more hp than a JH. Only hitch is it does knock if I lug it a low rpm, even on premium
 
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