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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at a reasonably priced ( under 2k) 80 Rabbit with 50 k miles. truly owned by a old lady....aside for the usual issues with an old car that sat in a barn most of its life is their any thing to be wary of ?

It has a hot soak restart isse that could be the fuel sock, pump, etc. or maybe something else. It's K jet correct ?.
 

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Under $2k for that? Why didn't you buy it already? Depending on its actual condition, you could be looking at a $20k car...
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I work in mental health in a large rural school district and it showed up in the parking lot one day . It's an automatic and I really didnt think it was that special-20 K...really ? It's not a GTI . It would have to get better gas milage than my 91 244 Volvo.....plus I can work on it as its my speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Even if it’s worth $5k, I’d buy it for $2k….

Send it my way with the title and I’ll get it fixed..

-Todd
I'm sure I can fix it...I worked in German car dealer service for a longtime , primarily in the 80's My dad had a carburetor Rabbit in maybe 76 or so .... I plan on driving it. Do they have steel or copper brake lines?
 

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Automatics have a know heat soak issue as the Starter is under the exhaust manifold. There is Shielding that surrounds the starter but it has no ventilation. The Fix from VW was to install a 40 amp relay that was from the battery to the starter with the pick line for the relay from the original starter solenoid wire.

See:
Original TSB:

Newer fix non oem:

Big thank you to Kammy at Cabby-info.com
 

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Lots of CIS systems had hot start issues. Many manufacturers had fixes that worked around the cold start valve. I do believe VW used this trick too.

If you elect to purchase it, I would check the pressures and get them set up to stock. Set the main pressure, then the hot control pressure, and finally the cold pressure. In that order. You can probably play with the cold pressure to suit your area. I would check the distribution from the fuel distributor. Make certain they all flow the same amount. There are some adjustments so all the injectors flow the same. Most of these adjustments are not in any Bentley since they are not approved.

Once everything is set up properly, you will probably find your problem gone. The fuel accumulator can cause issues but I've never really seen it help a hot start problem. Leaking fuel injectors can cause a hot start problem.

If you have any problems with the CIS components, good luck with finding any good stuff. CIS systems like good fuel and although the vehicle has 50k, that may not be ideal for that fuel system. Condensation in the fuel tank, varnish, rust, etc can really cause havoc to a good fuel system. Especially rust.

Manufacturers do not use copper lines for brake lines and I hope you do not do that either. It's dangerous.
 

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Good advice, but I’ve fixed hot start issues, caused by a leaking accumulator. It’s job is to keep the system pressurized, when the car isn’t running. That pressure will eventually fade, but the accumulator has a purpose.

Leaking injectors or leaking anything, won’t help.

I’m sure he meant NiCopp lines, but these lines are steel.

-Todd
 

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Yeah, the accumulator does have it's purpose and if it tests bad, it NEEDS to be replaced. I have had many clients that have paid for an accumulator but they still had their problem. Usually the discussion revolves around I do not know what I'm doing and they want their money back. No so much now, but when I was at the dealership. Understanding where the client was coming from, the sales pitch for an accumulator was changed.

My take is that the fuel lines from the fuel distributor to the injectors is what vaporizes and once that area is compromised, that vapor must pass before the liquid fuel is sprayed. This is what I found. Insulating the injector lines did more help than the accumulator.

I believe the manufactures used the cold start valve to spray liquid fuel in the manifold to help it start while the injector lines were bleeding out the vapor. I hope that does make some sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Lots of CIS systems had hot start issues. Many manufacturers had fixes that worked around the cold start valve. I do believe VW used this trick too.

If you elect to purchase it, I would check the pressures and get them set up to stock. Set the main pressure, then the hot control pressure, and finally the cold pressure. In that order. You can probably play with the cold pressure to suit your area. I would check the distribution from the fuel distributor. Make certain they all flow the same amount. There are some adjustments so all the injectors flow the same. Most of these adjustments are not in any Bentley since they are not approved.

Once everything is set up properly, you will probably find your problem gone. The fuel accumulator can cause issues but I've never really seen it help a hot start problem. Leaking fuel injectors can cause a hot start problem.

If you have any problems with the CIS components, good luck with finding any good stuff. CIS systems like good fuel and although the vehicle has 50k, that may not be ideal for that fuel system. Condensation in the fuel tank, varnish, rust, etc can really cause havoc to a good fuel system. Especially rust.

Manufacturers do not use copper lines for brake lines and I hope you do not do that either. It's dangerous.
I

Actually I should of said alloy as you are correct no one uses straight copper. Volvo uses something that looks copper like as its not just steel. I have never seen one rust out .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I

Actually I should of said alloy as you are correct no one uses straight copper. Volvo uses something that looks copper like as its not just steel. I have never seen one rust out .
I remember using that CIS flow rate rig back in the 80's. Memory is hazy but I seem to recall using a four gas when we were setting pressures,but I could be wrong. Thanks for the tips as my memory has been re booted as I remember more about my CIS days- I worked at BMW, my friends worked at MB and others worked at VW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
They never rust there. Especially not a whole hole.
There's lots of rust elsewhere. I promise.
Interior may be very nice though if the mileage is what you think it is.
The interior is literally like new...no wear on the typical candidates. I looked close at all the usual rust spots ..rockers , floors and found no bubbles or bondo ...I plan on looking again tomorrow. My 69 220 d had a hole there but they rusted everywhere !
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
They never rust there. Especially not a whole hole.
There's lots of rust elsewhere. I promise.
Interior may be very nice though if the mileage is what you think it is.
Since I bought the car I have had a chance to check it out further. The rust hole isn't in the fender by the light it's at the top of the fender at the end of the a pillar. Way smaller than a dime I have photos if you want to PM me . The only issue so far beyond the odd hot soak restart is the needle bearing for the steering col shaft is loose in the column tube- the one closer to the firewall. Some bozos sold the lady an ignition switch as a repair ( hunh.....) for the odd starting issue ( I had no problems beyond a balky start ( acted like fuel starvation for about 3 cycles and then it lit) and shipped it back to her with a wobbly steering column. I tucked the brg into the tube and seemingly "fixed" it . For now...I need to see what's supposdly holding the brg in the tube to center the steering col shaft.

I think I have a book somewhere.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Since I bought the car I have had a chance to check it out further. The rust hole isn't in the fender by the light it's at the top of the fender at the end of the a pillar. Way smaller than a dime I have photos if you want to PM me . The only issue so far beyond the odd hot soak restart is the needle bearing for the steering col shaft is loose in the column tube- the one closer to the firewall. Some bozos sold the lady an ignition switch as a repair ( hunh.....) for the odd starting issue ( I had no problems beyond a balky start ( acted like fuel starvation for about 3 cycles and then it lit) and shipped it back to her with a wobbly steering column. I tucked the brg into the tube and seemingly "fixed" it . For now...I need to see what's supposdly holding the brg in the tube to center the steering col shaft.

I think I have a book somewhere.....
Interior is very nice and unworn ..I know all the "used car lot tricks " No rust but the very small hole ....
 
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