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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Came across this over at http://www.evo.co.uk. Did a search, hope it's not a repost.

Quote, originally posted by http://www.evo.co.uk/carreview....html »

Once viewed as Philistines for crimes against perfectly good sports cars, these days tuning companies (or at least the best ones) represent a credible alternative to the mainstream. Some of them have even been embraced by the establishment - AMG is now an official affiliate of Mercedes-Benz, Brabus has official connections too, and Alpina enjoys a close relationship with BMW.

The result is an engine that encourages a near-permanent right foot/carpet connection

Still unconvinced? Well, consider that in an independent test by a German magazine, a 4.1-litre 414bhp version of the 9ff-converted Porsche Cayman that you see pictured here was a second quicker around VW's test track than the recently launched 997 GT3.
Unfortunately that same magazine, according to the diagnostics system, spent a good part of the day over-revving the engine. Unsurprisingly, it went bang. So rather than the 4.1-litre (modified from a 3.8-litre 997 unit), today we're driving 9ff's 'maximum performance' conversion on the 3.4-litre Cayman S lump, hastily dropped into the CR-42 demo car while a new 4.1 is being built.
Even this 'lesser' engine develops 345bhp - up from 291bhp, with torque rising from 251 to 262lb ft - thanks to a raft of modifications that include bigger valves, ported heads, lightweight pistons, new camshafts and replacement inlet and exhaust manifolds. The result is an engine that encourages a near-permanent right foot/carpet connection. Soar past the 4500-5500rpm sector of the rev counter (where there's a skull-cracking boom that you really wouldn't want to subject your eardrums to for too long) and the engine note is crisp, precise, mechanical, insistent.
There's savage acceleration to accompany the music, delivered with the sort of zealous throttle response that you only get from a hyperactive normally aspirated engine. Subjectively it feels on the pace with, or even slightly in front of, a 911 Carrera S, but we'd need a stopwatch to be sure.
The 9ff Cayman is predictably lower and stiffer than standard, yet it still rides reasonably well. However, because the chassis has been set-up with a heavy track-use bias, bumpy roads have it weaving hither and thither when you accelerate hard. There's a limited-slip differential, too, just to keep you on your toes.
The brakes - GT3 discs grabbed by 996 Turbo callipers - would benefit from more initial bite as a confidence-booster at moderate speeds, but when you're gunning the 9ff they're powerful and fade-free. And it's when you're using the car like this, to extremes, that the benefits of the Cayman's mid-engined layout take on a fresh clarity. Compared with a 911, the smaller Porsche's back end is less of a rogue element, the chassis having a more natural balance when you're into a corner.
The 9ff conversion on the Cayman is blemished in a number of ways, and that mid-range cacophony could easily dissuade you from using it every day. On the other hand, the engine's manic top-end energy invigorates the chassis in a way that Porsche's standard powerplants can't quite manage, and the race rawness of the entire package seems to suit the car extremely well.
Yes, it's a Cayman for 911 money, but then there is some virtue in the fact that it's different to a 911, smaller than a 911 and more focused than a 911. Can't wait for 9ff to fix the 4.1.





More Pics From: http://www.classicdriver.com/u...12955





 

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Re: 9ff Cayman (meatwad79)

Quote, originally posted by meatwad79 »
i love the front fascia, but i dont get those wheels?

I love the 80s. And I love those wheels.
But I don't think they work on THAT car.
 

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Re: 9ff Cayman (meatwad79)

Quote, originally posted by meatwad79 »
i love the front fascia, but i dont get those wheels?

The wheels are definitely... interesting... obviously very retro... I'm still undecided.
 

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Re: (MikeSAABt)

I'm going to agree, the biggest problem I have with the Cayman and it's relatives is the size of the front overhang. (Please spare me the history lesson, I know the 550 was beeky as well, that doesn't make it right in the modern interpretation). I wish someone would address that aspect of the car, Porsche perhaps?
Did I mention that these photos do everything to highlight the part I hate. No. Must have forgotten but I'm sure you noticed.
 

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Re: (Max Rebo)

Quote, originally posted by Max Rebo »
Any ideas on what "9ff" means?

Looks like they went hexadecimal with the numbering.

FF = 15*16 + 15*1 = 255
So its basically a 9255.


Modified by tdogg74 at 12:44 PM 8-17-2006
 

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Re: (CBJ)

Quote, originally posted by CBJ »
I'm going to agree, the biggest problem I have with the Cayman and it's relatives is the size of the front overhang. (Please spare me the history lesson, I know the 550 was beeky as well, that doesn't make it right in the modern interpretation). I wish someone would address that aspect of the car, Porsche perhaps?.

I agree with you, but the problem is how could then move the wheels further out/make the snout shorter without making the whole front end look, well...weird? I have a hard time envisioning the 911 with a different nose...

the 9ff Cayman makes the normal Caymen look like a Taurus by comparison.
 

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Re: 9ff Cayman (BrianGriffin)

9FF is named for the owner's names, which begin with the letter F. The 9 is from their origins tuning 911's. According to Evo.
 

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Re: 9ff Cayman (BrianGriffin)

look at the hips on that.... I am very attracted to this car. *pants tighten*
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Re: 9ff Cayman (meatwad79)

I'm still undecided on the wheels, but I'm all for stretching the limits a bit. They wanted a racing-stlye wheel, and it's refreshing to see that they didn't go the BBS / OZ / etc. route. They kind of remind me of rally car wheels.
You guys have any idea of what's up with these:

They look like custom turbo intakes, but this is an NA engine. Brake ducting maybe?
 
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