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Awesome thread. It’s great to read the details of why you chose to do what you did. Looking forward to more!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Awesome thread. It’s great to read the details of why you chose to do what you did. Looking forward to more!
Thanks man! That's what I'm all about so if you're enjoying it so far there's more where that came from. I'm going to be aiming to finish the post on all the suspension work this weekend some time if time permits.
 

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wow. what a treat! Hard to find a comprehensive thread/write up these days! Great job
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
wow. what a treat! Hard to find a comprehensive thread/write up these days! Great job
Thanks!! Really appreciate all the positive feedback so far, it’s making the time I’m putting into the write-ups feel worthwhile and I hope it is really helpful and educational to all readers.

I am working on the suspension sections as we speak and I should definitely have it posted in the next day or so. It is definitely the most comprehensive section so far so if that’s what you’re into I think you’ll enjoy it!

Also, on a side-note, I see you live near Wilmington, DE. Any chance you go to the Wilmington Cars & Coffee group? I’m not too far and have showed up for a few of those meets!
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Hi guys! The suspension post is live! It's the most comprehensive post yet and I'm sure those of you who have remarked on your enjoyment of that aspect of the thread so far will LOVE it (and hopefully learn a lot, which is always my primarily goal).
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Updated: Added somewhere around 20 new pictures to sections I had already written on. Most notably are pre-install pics of BBK and Billy Boat Exhaust. Good eye-candy!
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Hi guys! The suspension post is live! It's the most comprehensive post yet and I'm sure those of you who have remarked on your enjoyment of that aspect of the thread so far will LOVE it (and hopefully learn a lot, which is always my primarily goal).

No promises but I'm going to try to get the next section of the build thread out this weekend if time permits. That may take me into the BT build portion of things but if not it'll get everything else from where I left off with the suspension work leading up to the BT build out of the way so that BT info will be what's left. And, of course, that's the big feature event!
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I haven't gotten around to the new section I was teasing yet (hopefully will have the time over the Holidays) but I did put some time into significantly revamping the section on my clutch kit decision (post #7) because I realized it was just too half-assed on the details of why EXACTLY I came to the decision I did (the research I did on the brands available, individual components, clutch friction materials, etc.). So for anyone interested... have at it!
 

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Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Hi guys/gals,

NEW POST IS UP!!! Post #9 covers miscellaneous mods that I've done over the years that I can't remember the exact chronology of but I didn't want them to slip through the cracks. As usual, for those that warrant it, I go into pretty exhaustive detail on not only why I chose the mods but why I DIDN'T choose some other options (based on technical details and explanations of how the systems these mods impact actually work, of course).

Lot's of pics too in this one too!

Hope I haven't lost you all over the many months I've been too busy to make any significant updates. Up until recently I was just going over the posts I already had and adding details I had missed, etc. I am aiming to have more regular updates this Summer!

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Hey all,

NEW POST IS UP!!! Post #10 covers miscellaneous maintenance and troubleshooting/diagnosis I have done over the years, complete with plenty of detailed tips and also a couple sort-of DIYs guides.

I haven't been getting any feedback since I initially posted the thread last year which is kinda a bummer to be honest. Maybe my over-detailed style is even more of a turn-off than I thought it would be. But it's how I am and it's how I envision my build thread so I'm going to keep at it for myself and for whatever good it does for people who may glean some things from it.

Next up will be a post about some pretty major changes towards a much more track-oriented car. I expect to have that post done fairly soon!
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
Hey all,

TWO THINGS:

1) NEW POST IS UP! Post #11 covers a "definite turning point" for the car from what once a fairly 50/50 mix between a street friendly and track-capable car into one that is now more track-oriented, at the expense of some street manners, unfortunately. This section covers my rear suspension overhaul, wheel alignment specs and behaviors on street and track (in-depth), race pads and fluid, track tires, race density mounts, and a little more.

2) My track visits this year kept getting delayed due to mine and my track buddies schedule, but I did go to the track for a time-trials event at Thompson Speedway over July 6-7th finally.... and I got delayed again because literally on the way to the track I encountered an issue with my throttle body that kept putting my car into limp mode if I pushed full throttle. I did a lot of checks of the electrical/sensors and some data points with VCDS and have now come to the conclusion that the throttle body motors or plate itself are malfunctioning.

Although it is against my better judgement, due to mixed reviews and some personal doubts I have based on my own knowledge of tuning parameters, I am going to give the Grams Performance 70mm throttle body a try. More now my motivation is that it is much more robust than the cheap factory unit which uses a primarily plastic-backed throttle plate and also that the Grams throttle body purportedly gives much quicker throttle input/response making it easier to modulate partial throttle which could come in handy at the track, as well as being overall more rewarding to drive. However, despite being advertised as "plug-n-play", I strongly suspect it will likely require a tune adjustment for everything to work properly together since a given percentage of throttle plate open on the Grams does not remotely translate to the same throttle valve angle as the factory throttle body, therefore does not translate to the same amount of intake air. But that remains to be seen, I will make a post on that when I get around to installing and log some data, particularly around air intake and fuel trims.

Curiously, the throttle body failure which caused me to miss the track events may have been a blessing in disguise because as it turns out this happened not long after:


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That mount must have been very weak around the time I was heading to the track because I did not hit any remotely significant bumps or holes to cause that to happen. Not anytime in the near past. So whatever happened had happened some time before and the mount was just barely hanging on. The bushing then rather randomly and unexpectedly blew through the mount the next day. I only knew after the fact because, not surprisingly, it started making some crazy noises over bumps and the back-end wanted to wander over bumps as well. Had this happened at the track during cornering the results could have been dangerous.

Thankfully after I inspected all visible parts of the suspension and concluded everything was good I pretty much immediately suspected the shock mount because it has a pretty tell-tale sound if you've heard what failed shock mounts sound like before. I pretty much knew the first time I heard it that it was either that or sway bar clunk, which I ruled out quickly. Got the mount replaced but still wasn't able to solve the throttle body issue in time for the track events. So, alas, it won't be until August sometime that I get to a track day it seems...
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
One Un-planned “Upgrade”


***Note: Summer 2019…


I was hoping to fit the below the below feedback about the Grams Performance 70mm throttle body I installed into post #10 since this was basically a miscellaneous upgrade that I installed more out of opportunity than as part of a specific goal or project, but unfortunately it put that post well over the character limit HAHA. So, I’ll encapsulate my feedback on it here as a standalone post.

I did not switch to this part with the goal of seeing any gains from it but because I was experiencing some issues and codes that I attributed to issues with my factory throttle body. It turned out that these issues were electrical and that the factory throttle body was mechanically sound, but that’s neither here nor there; I addressed that after I had already upgraded to the Grams TB and I decided to keep it anyway.


Relevant Info on TB Function & ECU Fuel Trim Behaviors

So what’s my feedback on the Grams TB? Well, given the nature of the part, talking about the Grams TB involves talking about air intake volumes which, in turn, involves talking about fuel trims so before you’ll be able to fully appreciate my feedback there are some aspects of ECU behavior that you’ll need to understand thoroughly. I’ll cover that specific ECU behavior after I briefly overview the function of the TB itself for anyone who isn’t totally familiar.

The TB has a valve/plate inside which can be closed, open, or any degree of position in between. The position of the throttle valve determines the amount of air that gets through the throttle body and into the intake manifold for combustion. On these vehicles there is no physical connection between the throttle pedal and the throttle body; the driver operates the throttle pedal to a certain position and the ECU interprets this, then sends a signal to the throttle body which opens the throttle valve to the appropriate position/angle with electronically actuated motors. The throttle body is equipped with multiple sensors to command what angle the throttle valve should be at and whether or not it did indeed reach that angle.

Now, we can’t talk about air intake related ECU behaviors/decisions without talking about fuel trims as well. The ECU uses a host of sensors to determine how much air and fuel are needed for optimal combustion relative to the throttle demand of the driver at any given time (and some other conditional variables). As you know, the throttle valve angle determines how much of a given amount of intake air can pass through for combustion at a given interval of time and the ECU knows that angle thanks to the throttle position sensor (TPS) on the TB. The ECU then uses mass airflow (MAF) data, which reads air intake volume in grams per second, to know how much total intake air volume is available at the same interval of time. The ECU then combines this information to determine, very accurately, how much air volume will be present for combustion past the intake valves per open stroke of the engine (which of course involves calculations from the camshaft position sensor in regards to engine timing too but that’s outside the scope of the current discussion). With this information the ECU can determine how much fuel to inject. ECUs for turbocharged cars will also use the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor to further refine the calculations for air/fuel ratio (AFR) but the MAF is still the primary driver for those calculations of air intake volume.

The ECUs job isn’t done there, here is where the complexity of the ECUs decision making is truly neat. The ECU even further refines the fuel injection necessary for an optimal AFR at any given time by processing data from the bank 1 (pre-catalyst) oxygen sensor (O2 sensor). The primary O2 sensor will report to the ECU whether the AFR was too rich (more than enough fuel) or too lean (not enough fuel) and then the ECU will take immediate corrective action on the fuel injection with a “short-term” fuel trim. The O2 sensor of course reports on the results of the correction as well and any further correction occurs, so on and so on. This, of course, is all happening at lightning speed so AFRs can be corrected in fractions of a second in any driving conditions. The speed at which the ECU acts on all if this sensor data is truly amazing (at least to a tech nerd and software engineer like me). But we are still not done yet, the ECU has another ace up its sleeve. Thanks to machine learning principles (as we call it in the software field), the ECU is capable of learning from the short-term corrections it has to make and adapting a long-term adjustment based on the short-term corrections. Once the ECU has compiled enough data to adapt a long-term fuel trim it will use that fuel mapping instead of having to constantly take corrective action. As fast as the ECU can make short-term trim adjustments, it is still much more ideal and safer for the ECU to correct the AFR by injecting exactly the right amount of fuel for combustion upfront. Of course, just as the suite of sensors (primarily the O2 sensor) help the ECU optimize its short-term trim, the same is true of the long-term trim; so the long-term trim gets more and more accurate with time.


Expectations of the Grams TB

So… how does all this tie into my feedback on the Grams TB? Well, right out of the gate I’ll say that I had reservations about buying the Grams TB over another factory TB replacement. For starters, the factory TB is NOT an air flow restriction on even very, very high HP builds (much higher than mine). That’s not to say that the greater size of the Grams TB (70mm diameter compared to 56mm diameter of the stock TB) cannot be beneficial for making more power on a setup that is already maxing out air flow. It just means it is entirely unnecessary for making huge amounts of power. Also, since a given throttle valve angle of the Grams TB is nowhere near the same as the factory unit, due to the size of their inlets/valves, the Grams TB is going to allow a good deal more air (up to 25% more based on its size) into the intake manifold and the ECU is technically not going to know this. If you were following along with my description of how the ECU uses all of the data I discussed, then you will realize that at the point that a given amount of air is occupying the intake manifold and flowing into the combustion chamber, the ECU has consulted data from the MAF and the TPS sensor (and to a lesser extent the MAP sensor). None of these sensors give the ECU the ability to recognize that the Grams has allowed more air in for a given throttle valve angle. So initially, the ECUs fuel injection calculations will be off. While the ECU’s after-the-fact adaptability through the data from the primary O2 sensor is phenomenal, it is not without its limits. The ECU can only take correction action via fuel trims up to certain amounts. The tables loaded into the ECU have prescribed limits on how much the ECU can adjust the trim by to correct AFR.

I was tentative as to whether or not the ECU would reach that limit before being able to properly correct for the Grams TB. Explicit tuning adjustments could, of course, correct that but since I wasn’t looking for power gains out of the Grams TB at the time I was not interested in adjusting my tune just to make the Grams work. That said, the only benefits I was hoping to gain out of the Grams TB that are advertised (and supported by several user reviews on forums) was faster throttle response – as in faster reaction from the electronic motors in the TB to my input at the pedal – so that I could better modulate throttle, as well as a more robust unit to replace the cheap factory unit which uses a primarily plastic-backed throttle plate.


Feedback on the Grams TB

My feedback is pretty mixed. I’ll start with the good. The best part is that my concerns about the Grams TB possibly requiring specific tuning changes, despite being advertised as “plug n play”, were misplaced concerns. In fact, the ECU adapted to the increased intake air volume very, very quickly. After installing the Grams TB, I performed a capacity discharge by disconnecting and touching the battery leads together for a few mins to clear the ECU of all of its fuel trim memory. I then performed a throttle body adaptation via VCDS software. Lastly, I went for a drive to log some data (also with VCDS). I drove reservedly, minimal throttle, for a bit and then slowly increased to brief pulls with moderate throttle, and finally full pulls to redline with wide-open throttle (WOT). At every increment I had my co-pilot watching the AFR related data for signs of lean conditions. By the time I got to doing the WOT pulls, the ones where I would most expected to see potential lean conditions, the ECU had already adapted sufficiently and was injecting enough fuel already so I never went lean. Not once. So, in my experience, the Grams TB is plug n play, as far as AFR impact goes. There may be edge-cases wherein if the ECU has to make drastic corrections to certain parameters then the Grams TB’s presence and its role in changing equations may put those corrections outside the prescribed range for certain data tables so that the ECU can NOT make the right correction and instead slams the throttle valve shut to protect the engine. This would essentially be chalked up to a drive-ability concern but, again, this would be an edge-case and should not happen on a car that is running properly and has a good tune. I believe those edge-case conditions I described are what are behind certain users’ reviews on the Grams TB not being plug n play; so, essentially, in my opinion I think those users' cars (or more likely tunes) were not working optimally from the get-go, but the Grams TB exacerbated that to the point where there was an actually noticeable repercussion. Therefore, the Grams TB gets incorrectly blamed when, in fact, the user was just not aware that there was an underlying suboptimal factor at play.

The only other good thing is the Grams TB looks nice and is, indeed, much more robust than the factory unit in every way that I can observe.

Now the bad… throttle response is not really discernibly faster. If it is it is very slight. It is hard to say why my experience with throttle response after installing the Grams TB is different than many other users who have reported very noticeably faster throttle response and throttle modulation ability. It could be that they are suffering from a form of placebo effect. God knows that is very prevalent in the community. It could be that they had aged TBs with internal motors that were not acting as quickly as usual so, by comparison, the Grams felt faster. It could be that their reports are true and it simply comes down to factor specific to their cars compared to mine (e.g. my larger turbo and slower spool masks the throttle response benefits). I personally doubt that particular reason because despite the fact that my spool has some delay I can still definitely detect that reaction of throttle response and would, therefore, be able to tell if it was improved. But I guess the point is that there could be factors at play that no one can really identify. So it's hard for me, or anyone, to predict whether YOU would stand to benefit by better throttle response if you were to install a Grams TB. I can only say that I definitely did NOT. I may have gained a tiny bit of power up top but, again, if I did it is slight and within the margin for error of being mistaken. Frankly, if someone else had installed this part on my car unbeknownst to me and I was to go for a drive I wouldn't know anything was different. So basically all I got out of this, for now, is a nice looking and (seemingly) more robust part.

I suspect all of the above regarding the minimal-to-no power gain and the fact that I didn't need a tune revision could be different for others who are pushing further limits than I am. Currently I'm only @ 22PSI on my GTX2867R. If I were pushing 30PSI with dramatically more air I imagine adding this TB would have more exaggerated impact on the necessary fueling to compensate and may, at that point, require some tuning adjustments. Of course that would also mean I’d get more out of it in terms of power gains in the upper RPM range from increased flow. So that’s probably the silver-lining here; while I didn’t get much benefit out of it now I may yet someday get some benefit out of it when I’m pushing my turbo to its limits.


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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
NEW POST IS LIVE!

I've updated the end of post #11 to include information and pictures of a custom CNC machined subframe dogbone pendulum bar designed to perfectly fit the B6 Passat platform. Many aftermarket companies erroneously market their Mk5 platform pendulum bars to fit the B6 Passat but this is incorrect. Most people aren't aware of that just like most people aren't aware that the B6 Passat factory pendulum bar is a different part # than that of the Mk5 platform (which means different specs). The B6 Passat's is actually a little bit longer and so to fit a Mk5 platform pendulum bar, whether OEM or aftermarket, requires forcing the fitment which has some side effects.

Read the "Custom Machined Dogbone Pendulum bar" section towards the end of post #11 for much more info and some cool pics of the fabrication process and final fitment!

In other news... I promise I'll get to the big turbo-related post in the next month or so. I know I've been saying this time and time again but I just haven't gotten around to it with all the other projects I have going on with the car and the business of track season, on top of work and personal life, so it's just fallen by the wayside for a bit. Once track season is over - my last track day is September 16 - I'll have more time and energy to put into the build thread and I'll finally get that post out!
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
FINALLY, after lots of delays I was able to get to the track for the first time this season. It's probably also the only time I'll get out to the track this season as I have too much going on to get out there before it gets colder. Next year will hopefully be different and I'll hopefully get started with track days early on in the season. But for now, enjoy this pretty length vid of some highlights. Apologies for the quality, I don't have the best setup for this kind of recording, although to be honest the video was actually pretty clear before it got compressed a lot to go online.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sx_U17KwiqU&t
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Update on Upcoming Mods

Well folks, the trend towards a more track-oriented car continues. My time at the track this past 2019 season made me come to terms with one major problem with my build that I was not previously looking far ahead or clearly enough to see coming... my build runs too HOT!

It would already run a tad on the hot side on the street if I was driving hard but the track is just a completely different ball game. My coolant temps at the track would reach 240F rather quickly and while they system was able to regulate it enough to get them back down, they'd spike back up at times too. I can only imagine what the oil temps were; I don't have a gauge for that but I'm sure they were not great. I'm already pushing this engine to its limits on power so I cannot afford to add additional stress with heat, if I ignore those issues it will doom my engine; I would not expect it to last a full 2020 season in those conditions so I have to do something.

Up until recently I was of the mindset that I'd just make it as long as I can on this engine without going out of my way to baby it because the sooner I have an excuse or just have the money saved to do an engine build the better... but after this last season I realize that is not the right approach because if I don't take care of these heat management issues it would be bad for my future hypothetical build engine too. Heat management must be dealt with as priority #1. Therefore, I plan to do the following over Winter in prep for 2020 track season:

1) Remove my Wagner Tuning IC in favor of a Treadstone TR8C "true" FMIC: I do not do this lightly because the Wagner Tuning IC (which I will cover thoroughly in my retro-active BT build post I have yet to finish), is a beast. It is of phenomenal quality and it is very effective in and of itself... however, it has one downside. It is enormous and it is thick, so it substantially reduced airflow to the radiator behind it and I blame that for at least 50% of my issues with coolant temps at the track and even high-ish temps on the street. Do NOT be fooled; contrary to popular belief, "true" FMIC are NOT better than a good quality stock location IC (not on their own merits anyway) and I will explain that thoroughly in my BT build post that I'm working on, but THIS situation I'm having is basically the one case in which the FMIC is the better choice. Heavy abuse/performance driving necessitates better flow to the radiator and much space between the radiator and IC.

The TR8C is large, for a FMIC, and it does not come with any kind of kit for mounting. It is just a core. I will be fabricating my own mounting and piping solutions so expect some great photo bombing when it's done!

2) Replace factory water-cooled oil cooler w/ external air-cooled unit: The factory oil cooler is cooled via the water/coolant mixture. This means, similar to the oil cooler/radiator relationship when they are too close, if one is getting too hot then the other is going to get too hot and it becomes a cyclical issue where they have a hard time regulating themselves. The solution is to separate them. I will be removing the factory cooler in favor of an external air-cooled oil cooler which I will mount somewhere near the slat/cover where for fog-light (if I had one) on the driver's side corner. I will either cut vents in it or just remove it entirely to feed cool air right to the new oil cooler.

3) Install oil temp and oil pressure gauges: Pretty self-explanatory... I really want to know what my oil temps are at now. Of course, it'll be too late to know how bad they WERE, but at least I'll know how good they (hopefully) are after all these mods. I also want to know the oil pressure. Other then the obvious reason that it is good to know for the sake of engine health, I also want to know because: A) oil pressure can drop during very hard right-handers because oil sloshes away from the oil pump pickup tube in the pan; B) I am going to be deleting the balance shaft assembly in the oil pump and want to make sure everything remains good there; C) low oil pressure can give early warnings of issues with engine internal tolerances

4) Install a full-blown water/meth injection setup: Let me be clear, I never wanted this. I swore I'd never get sucked up into the WMI craze because it's not all it is cracked up to be. At least not the way most people use it these days. Most people are using it as supplementary fueling and octane boosting to suffice for insufficient primary fueling so that they can still run very advanced timing and make lots more power. It does work for that, surely. But it's very foolish. These folks ramble about how their electronic safety systems will save them if the WMI stops spraying just the right amount for even a second (and it will because it is a matter of WHEN not IF)... Then I ask them: "Do you really think if your engine is rotating at, say, 6000RPMs / 100 rotations per SECOND, multiplied by the frequency of the intake and combustion strokes for your W/M solution, per cylinder, per revolution, that your safety system is going to step in and pull timing in time to stop you from melting a piston or worse?" Usually I get no response because there is no good response. There's no chance. The safety systems would have to be predictive, not reactive, to protect in that scenario. WMI is simply not safe to rely on. It also doesn't clean intake valves nearly as well as people say. A lot of folks say that there basic post-intercooler WMI nozzle is keeping their intake valves squeaky free of carbon... well, if that is true then they are not reaping the full benefits of the WMI because the solution should be completely atomized and evaporated long BEFORE it hits the intake valves. If it isn't then it isn't cooling the air as much as it could. The only way that you can have a bit of intake cleaning action is if you have direct port injected WMI at your intake manifold runners but even then, a majority of the solution should be evaporated before it hits the valve stems if it is going to do its job to the greatest extent possible for cooling. So the valve cleaning action of WMI is greatly overstated; a properly setup WMI system is almost (but not entirely) mutually exclusive with any significant valve cleaning action; but, yes, it will certainly help.

That said, I'm very critical of WMI and most peoples reasons for using it, but there is one good reason to use it and that is obviously for COOLING. I will be running a post-turbo + post-intercooler + direct port injection setup which will massively decrease intake air temps, massively reduce the demands on the smaller IC I'll be running, and massively reduce combustion temps which, in turn, will mean reduced exhaust gas temps, which will then mean reduced turbocharger temps, all of which will mean much lower coolant and oil temps and a happier running engine/turbo. Everything will be cooler and happer; heat is the ENEMY for any car, especially a track car. Bonus: the latent advantages granted by lower temps for combustion and the fact that I'll have no timing pull even under the hardest usage will grant passive power increases despite not tuning for the octane boost at all; I would expect between 5-10% HP max (20-40HP)

5) Deleting oil pump balance shaft units: I'll get into more depth on this one in a future post in terms of WHY, for those of you who don't already know about the notorious oil pump balance shaft issues. In short, removing the balance shafts will eliminate a major failure point of this engine for high HP, high revving builds, as well as increase oil capacity and thus reduce chances of oil starvation during tight right-hand cornering at the track, and even free up some power. The reduced rotation mass linked to the crankshaft will probably free up something like 5% HP (about 20HP), similar to how a Fluidampr pulley mod can free up 10-20hp.


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Okay... I got into a little more detail then I meant to there... I'll leave it at that, but rest assured that's only a snippet of what is to come. After I've finished my BT build post and then my subsequent post about the above mods when they are done, readers should have a pretty damn thorough understanding of what it takes to build a properly reliable high HP stock-engine 2.0T and all the principles that one needs to consider that go into reliability. It's anyone's guess how long this stock engine will last but it's already lasted a good deal of time considering the level of abuse I put it through and considering how much power I'm asking of it. Unless this last season took its toll on it in an irreversible manner then I suspect that with the above modifications it should make it through 2020 track season and that would be damn impressive (especially consider I fully expect to be around the 440bhp mark and a commensurate amount of torque by that point).
 

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Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
UPDATE:

1) One of the forums I had my build thread posted on (Passat World) recently underwent some changes and one of them is that thread owners can NOT edit posts beyond a few days old. That completely ruined my build thread on that forum because it would drive me absolutely nuts if I couldn't edit my mod list on on the main post #1 as time goes on (among plenty of other things).

It got me paranoid enough that I have created a fully formatted word doc out of all the content in the thread right now. It's not just a copy-paste of the BBCode from each post in here, it has all the same pics imbedded in the Doc, all the bold/italics/underlines for headings and read-ability, and I also added hyperlinks in the Table of Contents that are linked to the corresponding section in the doc for faster navigation. It may actually be even more ideal than using the forum and I WILL be updating that word doc along with this thread so they will both remain up -to-date.... UNLESS VWVortex goes the way of Passat World, which is the main reason I created the word doc version and put the link in the main post at the very top already. I'll keep that link the same and that way folks can always access the latest on the build if VWVortex goes the way of Passat World.

2) I'M 75% DONE THE BIG TURBO POST (#12)!!! I would have been done already but I sunk A LOT of time into putting the above mentioned doc together. Actually the BT post is already over the forum character limit so I'm gonna have to figure out how I want to handle that LOL. But, anyway, the wait is almost over!... if anyone's really been waiting this long

3) After I get the BT post up I'm aiming to have a fast-follower to cover the below mods because I'm going to be doing 90% of the stuff in the below list next week if it all goes smoothly

• Replace Wagner Tuning IC with TR8 FMIC/custom piping (to improve airflow to radiator at track)
• Remove Mishimoto radiator and revert back to OE radiator… after 1.5 years with the Mishi rad I am hard-pressed to see any benefit to water/coolant temps from it and I’ve heard from a few trusted sources that the cores are not particularly reliable (mine has been so far but I don’t want to risk it at the track). There are enough BT and track VWs with factory radiators and no water/coolant temp issues that I think I was getting ahead of myself with “upgrading”
• Delete AC/condenser to allow direct air flow straight to the radiator
• Replace factory oil cooler with BAR-TEK oil cooler connected to external 19-row air-cooled oil cooler mounted in place of deleted AC condenser (oil will be both water AND air cooled now)
• Remove/delete balance shaft units in oil pump (eliminates a major failure point, increases oil capacity to decrease odds of oil starvation during heavy cornering, reduced rotational mass on crankshaft)
• Convert Integrated Engineering valve cover/catch can setup to vent-to-atmosphere (VTA) filter setup routed under car (reduced upkeep needed at track when oil consumption is high)
• Install New South Performance oil pressure/oil temp gauges to double-gauge steering wheel pod (allows extra insight into running conditions of engine at track)
• Install WMI w/ post-turbo + post-intercooler + direct port injection nozzles for COOLING only, NOT to tune for additional power (this setup will allow dramatically lower intake air temps, combustion temps, exhaust gas temps, and thus a happier engine/turbo)

Question For the Audience:

At this point, or especially after the point that I do the above upcoming mods in the quote, would you say that I have totally invalidated the title of my build thread and the balance that I initially intended to strike with this car? Why or why not?

Just curious for your thoughts. I haven't used this car as a daily in 2 years so it's kinda irrelevant either way because its purpose and use have changed, but I find myself wonder "COULD it still be capable of living up to title of the thread that I never originally expected to become untrue?"
 

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2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
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1,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
IT'S HERE, IT'S FINALLY HERE!


Post #12 is live and covers the "big turbo" upgrade. There is substantial info on turbo selection considerations, wastegate considerations, boost control subjects, and some tuning related subjects. There was a lot more that I did around the time I did the big turbo upgrade and I was going to cover that in the same post but just what I have written already had to be paired down to fit in the character limits of a post so I'm breaking it down into two parts.

Part two will be out next (it will cover engine limitations, intercooling, fueling upgrades, and a couple more things!

After that the only post I have left to complete is the one on the recent upgrades I did in prep for 2020 track season and then this build thread will finally be caught up with the status of the car :thumbup:
 

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2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
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Discussion Starter #38
BIG UPDATE!


I finally finished the second half of the big turbo build project and many related supporting parts! Turns out my previous post about being 75% done was way off because I got carried away once I got back into writing it, as I usually do, and went into frankly gross technical depth on a few of the subjects, mainly intercooling. So I had to split it into 2 different posts due to character limits. I merged 2 much earlier posts (#4 and #5) into one to make some room for the now 3 total posts spanning the big turbo project details.


Here's what to expect loads of detail on:

Post #13: Stock engine limitations; Fluidampr pulley; fueling upgrades; intake manifolds upgrades

Post #15: Air cooling (w/ upgraded intercoolers) and water cooling (w/ upgraded radiators)
 

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2007 B6 Passat 2.0T, 1994 E36 M3 3.0L, 2004 Silverado Z71 5.3L
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1,818 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
NEW WHEELS!


Got new wheels delivered today. Neuspeed Hyper Silver RSe11R 18x9" w/ 45mm offset, hub bore 57.1mm so no hub rings needed, and only 19lbs. per wheel. Amazingly light for the size of the wheel. They should be strong though as they are flow-form casted which is a process similar to forging and yields pretty close strength.

These will be paired with my Summer/track tires (currently 255/35R18 Hankook Ventus R-S4 200AA A tires).

Just unboxed and inspected them for today, won't be mounting tires for a few months until the track season starts. Finish is superb and although I did get these wheels mainly for their specs I do like the spoke design as it is simple and understated. I don't like wheels that scream for too much attention. All things considered, Neuspeed hits it out of the park with this wheel.

Can't wait to get them mounted!




 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
I spent a bunch of time cleaning up and re-ordered the track video I posted in September. It is now only 8 mins long, but it used to be 23 mins long because it contained dash cam front-view and rear-view recordings one after the other. With new editing software I have overlayed the rear-view recording into the corner of the front-view recording and they are in sync so you can see what is going on at both angle at the same time which I think is REALLY neat. The cost of recording both front and rear is that the recordings are at 30FPS. Front is 1080p @ 30FPS and rear is 720p @ 30FPS. If I turn the rear recording off it can record from the front in 1080p @ 60FPS. None of that will be a concern in 2020 track season though because I will be using multiple GoPro cameras to get much better recordings from several angles as well as lap data overlays and more. Fun stuff coming this year. Stay tuned!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sx_U17KwiqU
 
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