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My 2017 Alltrack SE just passed 40k miles and the tires are ready for replacement. The plan is to order from Tire Rack and let my independent auto shop install when they do the 40k service.

So far I have had no flats or problems with the OEM Falken Sincera’s other than being a bit noisy. They have done ok in the DC area weather where we get little snow and I think 40K for tread wear isn’t too bad.

So was just gonna replace with the same until I was reading some of the reviews on Tire Rack. The Vredestein Quatrac 5 get better reviews though might be noisier.

I don’t race the car or go off road. It’s not a GTI but I do enjoy what it is capable of.

I would appreciate any tire recommendations.

Thanks


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I'd use the OEM Falken Sincera’s. This is because I read this review: "So far I have had no flats or problems with the OEM Falken Sincera’s other than being a bit noisy. They have done ok in the DC area weather where we get little snow and I think 40K for tread wear isn’t too bad."

If something works for you, then just repeat. That's what I do and then I know what result I'll get for the next time.

Trust me this thread will become like the "What Oil should I use" thread 3.2.1.........
 

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I'd use the OEM Falken Sincera’s. This is because I read this review: "So far I have had no flats or problems with the OEM Falken Sincera’s other than being a bit noisy. They have done ok in the DC area weather where we get little snow and I think 40K for tread wear isn’t too bad."

If something works for you, then just repeat. That's what I do and then I know what result I'll get for the next time.

Trust me this thread will become like the "What Oil should I use" thread 3.2.1.........
Ahaha so true. Tires are like oil.
You'll read something like: Avoid XXXXX brand. I always used XXXXX brand and never had problem with them. They are the best.

If you were happy with the Falkens go with them again.
 

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As Maya Angelou said, "I've learnt people will forget what you said, what you did. But people will never forget how you made them feel."

With that said, go with what you feel best for you. If you regret a decision you've made, you'll have no one to blame.
 

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I would go with multiple sets of wheels/ tires for the multiple road conditions that I come across. In Winter I prefer a dedicated Winter tire like the Nokian Hakkapellitta 9 studded, for the near Winter and early Spring when it isn’t crazy Winter but temperatures drop to freezing and the occasional snow might fall something like the Nokian WR G4 All weather tire is great. For summer nothing beats an ultra high performance tire. It’s best to go with something with a low thread wear rating for maximum summer grip. Of course there’s the time in between summer and the time when all weather tires are ideal. In that case I’d go a good performance all season such as the Continental DSW06.

In the Winter, it’s best to go narrow, so a 185 or narrower works great. In the summer it’s just the opposite 255 gives lots of grip.
 

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I would go with multiple sets of wheels/ tires for the multiple road conditions that I come across. In Winter I prefer a dedicated Winter tire like the Nokian Hakkapellitta 9 studded, for the near Winter and early Spring when it isn’t crazy Winter but temperatures drop to freezing and the occasional snow might fall something like the Nokian WR G4 All weather tire is great. For summer nothing beats an ultra high performance tire. It’s best to go with something with a low thread wear rating for maximum summer grip. Of course there’s the time in between summer and the time when all weather tires are ideal. In that case I’d go a good performance all season such as the Continental DSW06.

In the Winter, it’s best to go narrow, so a 185 or narrower works great. In the summer it’s just the opposite 255 gives lots of grip.
Good advice.
Which wheels on the Happas if you want to upgrade later to TT brakes?

(Dont fit under typical 16" steelies)


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Michelin Pilot Sport AS3+ in 225/50/17. Original Falkens was not a fan of and car doesn't really see offroad minus some local dirt roads.

AS3+ are a great 3 season tire, passable if you live somewhere with light winters but run dedicated snows late Nov-early Apr depending on the year.


Like the way the 225s look vs 205/55 stock size.

 

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205-55-17 is stock size.

you sure you went with 225-50-17? that offers no increased sidewall over stock, just a wider tire, still prob makes the wheel look better.

I'll be pulling the trigger on 225-55-17 in Nokian EnTyre 2.0, it's dirt cheap 80,000 mile tire that suited us well on previous installations.
 

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205-55-17 is stock size.

you sure you went with 225-50-17? that offers no increased sidewall over stock, just a wider tire, still prob makes the wheel look better.

I'll be pulling the trigger on 225-55-17 in Nokian EnTyre 2.0, it's dirt cheap 80,000 mile tire that suited us well on previous installations.
Oh yeah, my mistake. That got me closest to the stock overall diameter but in a 225 width for more summer performance.

We were trying to sort some vibration issues in the car as wel. Was running the snows from our Dieselgate TDI wagon which were technically undersized (205/45/16 iirc?) and those vibrated, so did the stock Falkens. One of them was plugged and rebalanced, but car is smooth as silk on the AS3's now.
 

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I got the Firestone Indy 500 in 215/55/17 and they have a LOT of grip but the sidewalls are very soft so there's not much steering feel. I think the curved shape of the sidewalls also contributes to that. But they do look cool
 

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205-55-17 is stock size.

you sure you went with 225-50-17? that offers no increased sidewall over stock, just a wider tire, still prob makes the wheel look better.

I'll be pulling the trigger on 225-55-17 in Nokian EnTyre 2.0, it's dirt cheap 80,000 mile tire that suited us well on previous installations.
That's a pretty big tire. Even at stock ride height, I'd wonder about it rubbing?

I'm also using 225/50 17. It's the same diameter as stock, but the biggest advantage is that there are a lot of options out there in that size. 205/55 17 is pretty limited.
 

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if people can run 215-65-16 without issues, i'll have no issues an 225-55-17 is a smidgid smaller. Biggest question will be will my spacers fit.
 

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dude, tirerack reviews are just user reviews so don't base your buying decision on the reviews. You need to read expert reviews where tires are tested empirically.
I'd ignore any of the advice in this thread as well. It is, after all, just user reviews.
 

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dude, tirerack reviews are just user reviews so don't base your buying decision on the reviews. You need to read expert reviews where tires are tested empirically.
hmmm...

almost all empirical tests on tires are done on tires that are practically new. There is a big difference in how tires perform new vs. old, and the degradation certainly isn't the same for all makes and models. I'd say that consumer reviews are actually pretty useful here, as long as one understands the limitations. I wouldn't get hung up on an individual review, but it's worth looking for trends among folks who have higher mileage on the tires--and tirerack's reviews can be pretty useful in that regard. It's just one piece of the puzzle, but until there are robust data on used tires, I wouldn't discount reviews.
 

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Well, I think we need some baseline in term of evaluating tires (and new sounds like a perfect baseline).

As for as end users evaluating tires I would never make a buying decision based on what folks say on a forum or retail based sites like TireRack. Legitimate tire testing programs evaluate tires empirically with instrument in varying conditions over long stretches of time. Of course the performance of a tire will reduce over time, I want to know how the tire performs new and then assume degradation, of course.

Consumer Reports tests more than 50 tire models every year for cars, SUVs, and trucks. A dozen or more tests are conducted by an expert team, mostly at the 327-acre Auto Test Center in Connecticut. They also test braking on ice at a local rink, and an outside lab assesses tire rolling resistance, which affects fuel economy.

My main point is that we all shouldn't be suckers, Tirerack wants to sell tires (and consumers should be smart about how they shop).





hmmm...

almost all empirical tests on tires are done on tires that are practically new. There is a big difference in how tires perform new vs. old, and the degradation certainly isn't the same for all makes and models. I'd say that consumer reviews are actually pretty useful here, as long as one understands the limitations. I wouldn't get hung up on an individual review, but it's worth looking for trends among folks who have higher mileage on the tires--and tirerack's reviews can be pretty useful in that regard. It's just one piece of the puzzle, but until there are robust data on used tires, I wouldn't discount reviews.
 

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by the way, go with Falken Sincera SN250 A/S (T) tire if you want a great, and well priced, all season.

I think it's a solid tire. When we bought the 2018 GSW 4MO, the stock tires were fairly well disliked and not the greatest in snow, so we swapped those for Conti DWS's straight away. However, the reviews on the Falken's are pretty good, so I am just leaving them on the 2018 Alltrack I bought. They aren't the greatest when you push them in the twisties, but they handle rain and snow pretty well.
 

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Kumho’s have a nice price point in that size. But they won’t ride better than what came on the car.

Sometimes the “aftermarket” version of a tire is pretty different than the version that came on new cars, due to how tire and vehicle manufacturers negotiate those contracts.

So if you like the Sincera’s but want a firmer ride you might actually get it from a new set of Sincera’s.

Safest bet to improve ride quality would be high end tires though, I’d look at either the Bridgestone’s new Turanza QuietTrak (last iteration of that tire was great) or the Michelins.
 

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Well, I think we need some baseline in term of evaluating tires (and new sounds like a perfect baseline).

As for as end users evaluating tires I would never make a buying decision based on what folks say on a forum or retail based sites like TireRack. Legitimate tire testing programs evaluate tires empirically with instrument in varying conditions over long stretches of time. Of course the performance of a tire will reduce over time, I want to know how the tire performs new and then assume degradation, of course.

Consumer Reports tests more than 50 tire models every year for cars, SUVs, and trucks. A dozen or more tests are conducted by an expert team, mostly at the 327-acre Auto Test Center in Connecticut. They also test braking on ice at a local rink, and an outside lab assesses tire rolling resistance, which affects fuel economy.

My main point is that we all shouldn't be suckers, Tirerack wants to sell tires (and consumers should be smart about how they shop).
TY. I'll look at CR when time comes for winter shoes. Saved for reference.


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