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Why is electrification losing momentum? What's your excuse for not buying an EV?

  • Duh, because EVs are too dang expensive!

    Votes: 44 26.2%
  • Duh, because dealerships don't have any EV/PHE/HEV/ICE in their stock!

    Votes: 5 3.0%
  • Duh, 300 miles EV range is still not good enough for me

    Votes: 25 14.9%
  • Duh, I don't have hours and days to charge EVs

    Votes: 17 10.1%
  • Duh, I ain't got any libertard charging stations near here boondocks!

    Votes: 9 5.4%
  • Duh, Electrification will never happen. Americans are addicted to ICE. Which country you from?

    Votes: 8 4.8%
  • Duh, high gas prices aren't here to stay. Don't panic and keep yer V8, fellas!

    Votes: 10 6.0%
  • Well, I have another reason why (tell us)...

    Votes: 14 8.3%
  • Hey everyone, Uber Wagon is a hypocrite. He bragged about buying a V6-turbo in TCL recently.

    Votes: 7 4.2%
  • Ban Uber.

    Votes: 12 7.1%
  • Hey Uber, I already did my part and have PHEV/EV in my garage.

    Votes: 17 10.1%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The answer is fat and resolute 'NO', according to the experts. Do you agree or disagree?

Sky Cloud Rectangle Gas Font


When Carol King bought a compact Hyundai Tucson SUV last year, she thought she’d be fine getting around 26 miles to the gallon. But as fuel prices in Los Angeles approach $5 a gallon, she’s thinking she may trade in her new SUV earlier than planned — even as early as next year.

“The price I’m paying [for fuel] right now is pretty frightening,” she said, adding that her next car is “almost certainly going to be electric.”
King isn’t the only one frightened about rising gas prices. President Joe Biden attempted to contend with the problem during his State of the Union address Tuesday, announcing the U.S. will release 30 million barrels of oil from the strategic reserve. The move appeared to have little immediate impact, however.

As trading ended Wednesday, the price of benchmarks like West Texas Intermediate crude were up as much as $9 a barrel, to more than $110. And at the pump, regular self-serve was going for $3.656 a gallon on average, up nearly 4 cents for the day and 26 cents over the previous month.

Electric vehicle sales have been rising for several years, and the pace is picking up as gas prices climb.
In 2019, just 3 percent of U.S. motorists said their “intention” was to buy a battery-electric vehicle the next time they were in the market, according to data from AutoPacific Research.

That rose to 10 percent in January, and nearly a quarter of the people surveyed said they’d consider changing the type of vehicle they buy if fuel prices keep rising.
At the time, AutoPacific was forecasting that demand for electric vehicles would grow to 700,000 for all of 2022, a considerable jump over last year, when Americans bought 491,000 all-electric vehicles.

But “I would be surprised if EV demand didn’t go up because of rising fuel prices and all the uncertainty the Ukraine invasion entails,” AutoPacific President Ed Kim said.

There are a variety of reasons why American motorists consider EVs, according to AutoPacific. Some are “early adopters,” some want the increased performance EVs can deliver, and for some it’s fighting climate change. But 83 percent of people the research firm describes as “EV handraisers” listed lower energy costs as their No. 1 reason.
“We’ve seen a twofold increase in sales including unprecedented reservations” for products like the GMC Hummer EV, the Ford F-150 Lightning and the Cadillac Lyriq in recent months, said Ryan LaFontaine, CEO of the LaFontaine Automotive Group, a major Midwest dealer group.

“Rising fuel prices certainly play a role,” LaFontaine added, noting his organization is confident enough about the market for EVs that it’s opening a showroom for Polestar, the all-electric brand spun off from Volvo.

Sales of “electrified” vehicles — which include hybrids and plug-in hybrids, as well as battery-electric vehicles — remain strongest along the coasts, especially the West Coast. California hit a milestone at the end of 2021, when the millionth plug-based model was sold there.
Stockton, California, resident Michael Macias, who bought the all-electric Volkswagen ID.4, called it “the perfect opportunity to put my principles of being a good steward of the Earth into practice.”

Mike Huntzinger, sales manager of Five Star Ford, the biggest Ford dealer in Texas, said he’s “starting to see increased traffic” and growing interest in vehicles like the Mustang Mach-E electric SUV. Huntzinger said demand for the Mach-E, which starts at $43,895, has doubled in recent months.

Dealers are also getting an assist from automakers, which have amped up advertising and marketing for their EVs. “You couldn’t watch a football game last fall without seeing an ad for the Mach-E or [F-150] Lightning,” Huntzinger said.

There are still a number of obstacles holding back widespread consumer EV adoption, including range and charging times. Longer-range models, such as the 520-mile Lucid Air, are helping reduce consumer resistance.
Then there’s price: On average, a battery-electric vehicle costs at least $4,000 more than a comparable, gas-powered model, according to industry data. And it can take a long time before an EV pays off in overall savings. The federal government is offering incentives of up to $7,500 to help offset the higher costs. A Biden administration proposal would take that figure up to as much as $12,500, but it’s stalled in Congress.

One thing analysts expect to boost demand is the array of new models flooding the U.S. market in 2022. Not only will the number of long-range EVs more than triple — to nearly 60 — but they’ll be available in more market segments, from compact SUVs to full-size pickups.
And they won’t all come with four wheels. Carl Malek, a researcher and analyst from Sterling Heights, Michigan, said he plans to buy an all-electric motorcycle this spring because “I wanted something good for commuting, especially with the current volatility of gasoline prices.”

He said he’s also considering trading in his “four-wheeled commuter,” a Buick Verano, for an EV.
NBC News
 

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We’ll duh… Even if you’re spending $200/month more on gas at current prices, shelling out thousands more on a new EV doesn’t see an ROI unless your current vehicle is already at the end of its lifespan. Assuming Carol in the article does switchover to an EV, there’s going to be higher acquisition cost there.

All that does is allow you to avoid 1x/wk sticker shock at the gas pump.
 

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We’ll duh… Even if you’re spending $200/month more on gas at current prices, shelling out thousands more on a new EV doesn’t see an ROI unless your current vehicle is already at the end of its lifespan. Assuming Carol in the article does switchover to an EV, there’s going to be higher acquisition cost there.

All that does is allow you to avoid 1x/wk sticker shock at the gas pump.
This. If you already own a car that's decently fuel efficient, and especially if it's fairly new, you'd be an idiot to replace it with an EV just to "save money on gas".
 
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PEV won't work for us out in the sticks.
Wife is ready for a hybrid though. She was actively looking at taking a ridiculous offer for her Highlander and getting a new Highlander Hybrid. The dealer would sell us one at sticker but couldn't confirm when it would deliver. She can't be without a vehicle so that was a no go.

Next plan was to add a Maverick to the fleet. Orders closed for the year.
Nothing else at that price point. We both prefer the Maverick to the more expensive base Prius.

So, we're on the sidelines pending supply chain issues, and/or manufactures getting it together.
 

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Something that I was surprised by that I noted in another thread:

I would've expected the prices of EVs to start getting jacked up by now but everything I've browsed on CarGurus has had either no change or had a price drop (even the golden child Teslas).
 

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I think that cars like the Jeep 4Xe powertrain or the BMW 330e and X5 45e are going to be the way to pave the road for broader acceptance of EVs.

Back in 2007/2008/2009 people dumped their trucks at big losses due to fuel prices spiking. Sedan pricing went through the roof. Rinse, wash, repeat, those people were right back in SUVs once oil prices settled down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Something that I was surprised by that I noted in another thread:

I would've expected the prices of EVs to start getting jacked up by now but everything I've browsed on CarGurus has had either no change or had a price drop (even the golden child Teslas).
My neighbor saw that I got an e-Tron and told me that Biden would have to pry his F-250 keys out of his cold dead hands so...there's that.:LOL:
 

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We’ll duh… Even if you’re spending $200/month more on gas at current prices, shelling out thousands more on a new EV doesn’t see an ROI unless your current vehicle is already at the end of its lifespan.
If you're now spending $200 a month more on fuel than you were before, then it does make sense to maybe lease the new EV, for the reduction in cost of gas if your current car isn't paid off yet, and you can reduce your total monthly outlay on car and fuel.

Let's say your current economy car costs you $250-300 a month to own, then there's the cost of fuel on top of that (if it was $200 before, it may be $400 now). If you swap that $250-300 a month payment over to a $250-350 a month payment on an EV (like the Bolt or Leaf, so we are comparing economy ICE with economy EVs), then your fueling costs (and thus total outlay) drop by almost $400 a month, which really does make financial sense. If the car you're driving IS paid off, then switching to an EV may only save you $50 or maybe just break even, BUT it will be newer, with more safety features than that older, paid off car might have, which may tip the balance if your car is aging.

Moving up to crossovers or non-economy cars, if your vehicle isn't paid off, it may be costing you $400-500 a month in either lease or loan payments and that $400 a month in fuel (or more). By swapping over to a similarly classed EV crossover or sedan, you can keep the same monthly payments, but lose the fueling costs for the most part. Again, saving a good chunk of change every month.
 

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Already daily a Tesla, and my second Tesla is arriving in July.

As you have heard me rant -- for 97% of USA residents, I honestly cannot understand the hesitance to adopt EV cars (other than where it's cost prohibitive -- which it still is for many people).
 

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We’ll duh… Even if you’re spending $200/month more on gas at current prices, shelling out thousands more on a new EV doesn’t see an ROI unless your current vehicle is already at the end of its lifespan. Assuming Carol in the article does switchover to an EV, there’s going to be higher acquisition cost there.
You'll never hear about Carole's car payment, only ALL THE MONEY she is saving at the pump, and HOW DUMB YOU ARE for not having an EV.
 

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Neither my wife nor I drive nearly enough to where making a change to a hybrid or EV make any logical sense at this point. There will be a time when we will want to retire the Tucson just based on age + miles driven, but we're probably (hopefully) 5 years away from that. We're at 161k miles and I really need to get to 2xx,xxx before we get a replacement. At that time, I fully expect to replace it with either a hybrid or EV.
 
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