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Looks awesome and go for it on the spacers. I think that will perfect it.
 

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Yes, spacers are a must IMO and will match perfectly with the H&R setup. I have 7mm + H&R springs, and gives it a stance similar to the 996.1 GT3.
 

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Dave, all else (price) aside, which of the Porsches do you prefer? Your 996, prior 930, or your silver 911S? Does the 996 have the occasion of the other two, or is it a better mix of comfort and driving? Obviously the values are a bit different, but just wondering what you’d rather have? Is the 996 better, or just more modern, something different, etc? Interested in your thoughts.
 

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I'm not Dave (obviously), but IME, I prefer the 996 just because it feels modern and is pretty good at being a sports car. The air cooled cars really feel kind of old- I'm not a fan of the 964/993 because they're a weird mix of new and old. The earlier air cooled cars truly feel like a classic old car- manual everything, no computer aids, very light. If I had the option, I'd want both.

But if I had to choose one, it would be the 996/7. Better ergonomics, more space, not too heavy, not too big. Definitely more for your money. The air cooled G bodies are the type of car you get when you really want a classic- kind of how you don't expect a '65 Mustang to perform like a new one.
 

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Welcome back to the 996 fold Dave! Your Aerokit looks fantastic lowered! The 996 Aero's are a real sweet spot that have finally got sucked up into the rising prices along with the 4S/TT/GT3/GT2's.

I love my buddies car which is pretty much on point suspension/upgrades wise, lucky for him his motor is sleeved already, most likely from the early days when they had issues with the coatings on the bores.

You cannot go wrong with the H&R's with some spacers and the Fisters and a 997 shifter.


The early 996 Aeros really do have a great charm to them for being able to upkeep without breaking the bank. While they dont have the crazy lightspeed power of the turbos or that Mezger wail of the GT3's, they also are 1/2 to 1/3rd the price which goes a long way to being able to enjoy the car.
 

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I'm not Dave (obviously), but IME, I prefer the 996 just because it feels modern and is pretty good at being a sports car. The air cooled cars really feel kind of old- I'm not a fan of the 964/993 because they're a weird mix of new and old. The earlier air cooled cars truly feel like a classic old car- manual everything, no computer aids, very light. If I had the option, I'd want both.

But if I had to choose one, it would be the 996/7. Better ergonomics, more space, not too heavy, not too big. Definitely more for your money. The air cooled G bodies are the type of car you get when you really want a classic- kind of how you don't expect a '65 Mustang to perform like a new one.
That’s kinda what I was wondering, I have a romanticized view of the 993 and 930 and even 964 and 3.2 Carreras, but no idea how they really stack up to one another.
 

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That’s kinda what I was wondering, I have a romanticized view of the 993 and 930 and even 964 and 3.2 Carreras, but no idea how they really stack up to one another.
I mean the trick is you have to drive them all and see which one speaks to you. As they get newer, they’re better. But better doesn’t mean more fun, depending on what you’re after. Drive a bunch, and you’ll drive one and smile and realize which one is for you.

964 Turbos and RS America’s are that sweet spot for me.
 

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Not Dave either, and, my 996 experience is focused on C4S models while co-owning a 911SC.

Pretty big gulf in rawness and aliveness (also livability) between a stock 996 and SC/3.2/etc. A '99 C2 will dial some of that spunk back in, by virtue of lightness and 3.4, but if you're looking for an occasion, an air-cooled will trump every time.*

*GT3 models not included
 

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Discussion Starter · #111 · (Edited)
Thanks all ! Wit the new PPF on the front and these minor mods, I'd ready to drive it!

Welcome back to the 996 fold Dave! Your Aerokit looks fantastic lowered! The 996 Aero's are a real sweet spot that have finally got sucked up into the rising prices along with the 4S/TT/GT3/GT2's.

You cannot go wrong with the H&R's with some spacers and the Fisters and a 997 shifter.
Exactly. For those who don't know Fister... They rebuild the factory mufflers and have a Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3 option. I went with Stage 1. Not too loud, but a very nice change over stock. My old mufflers were a tad loose and needed to be welded up anyway, so I decided to go with the Sister rebuild (which my local mechanic keeps around in stock for just such an occasion). I'm not changing to the 997 shifter, but IU'll likely add weight to the knob with a kit from one one of TCL members who has offered me an interesting option.

Dave, all else (price) aside, which of the Porsches do you prefer? Your 996, prior 930, or your silver 911S? Does the 996 have the occasion of the other two, or is it a better mix of comfort and driving? Obviously the values are a bit different, but just wondering what you’d rather have? Is the 996 better, or just more modern, something different, etc? Interested in your thoughts.
Well, this is the age-old question, isn't it? In the end, everyone has personal preference so my experience doesn't mean much to others. With that said, maybe I can summarize a few things I've said in other threads as I've swapped round a few Porsches. I've had this discussion with many friends, including our XiaoNio on here (who has become a valued friend in the real world), and of course everyone has their take on things.

The 930 was my first love. As such, she can do no wrong. It was my poster car and my goal once I reached a place in the world to play with cars. She fulfilled my every dream and I loved driving it. Nothing else screams Porsche like those wide haunches and that ridiculously beautiful tea-tray tail. The proportions are perfect. It's actually the only car I've ever owned that my wife actually LOVED the looks of. But, given that I sold it about 6 months after I bought and fixed up the hot-rod 1977 911S, I guess my wallet and heart spoke for me. I had had my time with it (9 years of great memories), and it isn't like I didn't still love it... I did. It was time for someone else to have time with it. Also, it was heavier, more lumbering than than the 911S, which I have described elsewhere as one of my favorite driving cars ever. the 1977 with e 3.0L engine was light, responsive, a tad rowdy. Like that friend you like to hang out with but hesitate to bring to another friend's party. A bit smelly and uncomfortable, too. And with the wide rear fenders on my 1977, I got a big part in that of what I lived about the 930. If I were to be buying and driving a vintage air-cooled car, I fully understand why others adore the 1980s cars (as I did), but I'd prefer a slightly hot-rodded 70s car for feel. In both cases, the A/C either doesn't exist or doesn't work well. Heaters are ok but not great. Easy to work on and fun to modify.

BUT. For a road trip? With a passenger? Over a couple days? Now we're talking 996 or 997. And the 996, particularly the early-vin cars with cable-throttle, etc... they are much more analog than any other non-air-cooled car, obviously. It definitely feels more like an older car now than ever. So you get a bit of the "I want a vintage car" while still having daily drivability. I love the 996 partly because it reminds me of an era, and how much I loved that car back in the early 2000s. So part of it is muscle memory and feel. But even taking that out, the 996 is just clean and simple and it does what you tell it to do. It's isn't as fast as many cars in my garage, but it is responsive. Point it and go, nice throttle feel. And comfortable enouygh to take my wife on a weekend trip when she doesn't want to go in a 1977 911S that rattles her bones or in a teenage-boy-magnet McLaren.

The 996 feel is very, very much like how I felt about my 2007 Cayman, which to me is still about as perfect a driving car as you could want. I sold the Cayman because, like the 930, I had run my course with it. Took it as far on the track as I could go, or wanted to. Swapped into my vintage Datsun 510 for track/racing and the Cayman just couldn't hold a candle to the fun factor for the 510 or the raw power and capability of the GT350R. the 992, 991, 997 Turbo, GT3 and GT3 RS cars are no doubt the pinnacle of the Porsche world and I have loved test driving them.

I like the 996 for it's low cost, tbh. I don't like wasting money if I don't have to. I've always said that the cost of a car isn't its purchase price, it's how much you lose in depreciation while you own it. And right now I believe the 996 is the easiest Porsche to own, not lose money, and likely make some. In 5 years, the 996 early Aerokit cars will likely be $65K - $80K, IMO. Double your money. That's hard to do with a GT3RS at the premium prices you buy at today.

So, the 996 is just another stop in the journey. Who knows how long I'll keep it.

In the end, the 996 with the Aero kit gives me a look of a GT3 with an engine that isn't too high strung, easy maintenance, and the ability take it just about anywhere. But my favorite driver for a morning when nobody is looking and I'mall alone would be a 1973-ish 911 RS clone with fully-upgraded suspension, viper green, with a hod-rodded 3.2L. I may still build that. Will the 996 stay in the garage? Likely, for a 5-year period before I harvest a gain on it.
 

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That’s kinda what I was wondering, I have a romanticized view of the 993 and 930 and even 964 and 3.2 Carreras, but no idea how they really stack up to one another.
I recommend driving a 993 and then a Carrera 3.2 G50 car ('87-'89) in that order. It will deliver the full gamut of air-cooled experience, starting with refined and finishing with the full-analog classic. You can extrapolate what the 964 is like from there. I have seat time in all three.
 

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Discussion Starter · #113 ·
I recommend driving a 993 and then a Carrera 3.2 G50 car ('87-'89) in that order. It will deliver the full gamut of air-cooled experience, starting with refined and finishing with the full-analog classic. You can extrapolate what the 964 is like from there. I have seat time in all three.
I think to get the “full gamut of air-cooled experience” you’d want to include a 3.0L 911SC, a 2.7L 911S, a 2.0L mid 60s 911 and a 356 with a 1.6L or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
I will own a green 1973 RS Clone at some point. I will also own a 997 Turbo Coupe in Speed Yellow or a 997 GT3 RS in Orange. Possibly a 991 GT3 in Mexico Blue. Until then, my history with the brand looks like this:

My 1985 Turbo-Look Cab (1997-2000)

Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Car Vehicle


My 1999 Aerokit Ocean Blue 996 (2003-2007)

Wheel Tire Automotive parking light Car Vehicle


My 1986 Turbo Coupe (2009-2019)

Wheel Tire Car Land vehicle Vehicle


My 2007 Cayman S 3.6L (2011-2020)

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Hood


My 1977 911S "Outlaw" (2019-2020)

Automotive parking light Car Tire Wheel Vehicle


And now the 1999 996 Aerokit Again (2021-??)

Wheel Automotive parking light Tire Car Land vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #115 ·
I mean the trick is you have to drive them all and see which one speaks to you. As they get newer, they’re better. But better doesn’t mean more fun, depending on what you’re after. Drive a bunch, and you’ll drive one and smile and realize which one is for you.
Exactly. The more you drive them, the more you realize what your own brand of fun is. Don't let others tell you what the "best " one is. It's like Ginger vs Mary Ann. Either way is good, but not the same answer for all (sorry if that dated me... it's like Margot Robbie vs. Gal Gadot)
 

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I am reminded of the saying “the best Porsche is the one you own.” In his latest review of the 992 GTS, Matt Farah talks about how enthusiasts seem obsessed with getting a GT3 for the motorsport feel, but that’s a little delusional. For most people, a regular Carrera S feels extremely racy. He postulates that for a street driven car, how much are you really getting for that extra? Hawc feelings aside, a rear engine, RWD car with an NA motor remains pretty unique.

Anyway, as discussed earlier, the circa 2000 cars seem to best bridge the analogue feeling with reasonable practicality and livability. AKA I like steering feel, but also air bags and air conditioning.
 

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I mean the trick is you have to drive them all and see which one speaks to you. As they get newer, they’re better. But better doesn’t mean more fun, depending on what you’re after. Drive a bunch, and you’ll drive one and smile and realize which one is for you.

964 Turbos and RS America’s are that sweet spot for me.
Totally agree with the point about driving them to see what speaks to you, since there's no consensus and the experience will differ for each person.

Aesthetically, I think the 964 Turbo is the best looking 911 ever created, but I've never driven one. Chris Harris mentioned it's one of the worst driving 911s though, for what it's worth.
 

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I am reminded of the saying “the best Porsche is the one you own.” In his latest review of the 992 GTS, Matt Farah talks about how enthusiasts seem obsessed with getting a GT3 for the motorsport feel, but that’s a little delusional. For most people, a regular Carrera S feels extremely racy. He postulates that for a street driven car, how much are you really getting for that extra? Hawc feelings aside, a rear engine, RWD car with an NA motor remains pretty unique.

Anyway, as discussed earlier, the circa 2000 cars seem to best bridge the analogue feeling with reasonable practicality and livability. AKA I like steering feel, but also air bags and air conditioning.
I think this is all true for cars in general, with few exceptions like the newer Mustangs beat the hell out of the old Fox-body variants. (I'm still halfway interested in a mystichrome 99 Cobra with a bunch of chassis and interior mods to make it decent, but I'm dumb)
 

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For most people, a regular Carrera S feels extremely racy. He postulates that for a street driven car, how much are you really getting for that extra?
I think to a large degree the right Porsche depends on your expectations and previous automotive experiences. At the end of the day though, if you have GT3 money, why not get the GT3 experience? I think we all have made choices where we chose the sportier version because we could A) afford it and B) because that's simply what we wanted.
 

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I am reminded of the saying “the best Porsche is the one you own.” In his latest review of the 992 GTS, Matt Farah talks about how enthusiasts seem obsessed with getting a GT3 for the motorsport feel, but that’s a little delusional. For most people, a regular Carrera S feels extremely racy. He postulates that for a street driven car, how much are you really getting for that extra? Hawc feelings aside, a rear engine, RWD car with an NA motor remains pretty unique.
On one hand, yes. On the other, the GT3 is the only way to get the NA H6 with the 6MT. The argument made a little more sense when a GT3 was just a 911 with more HP and a better suspension.
 
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