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Discussion Starter #41
WOW. Just... Wow.

We once commissioned a painting of a family member's dog and gave it to them as a wedding gift. It was probably the most fun gift I've ever participated in.
People commission others to do their work all the time. Art can be in many forms. One might say that people commission me to restore their cars. My work was on display in a few museums.



Towards the end of last year my wife sent me a link to an artist, as she often does. It doesn't necessarily mean she wants something from that artist, it's just a means of sharing. She was especially taken by this NY artist's critters. Since it's nearly impossible for her to pull the trigger and actually spend money, I went on a spree.

I contacted the artist and he gently put me off. Well, he kinda blew me off as he was quite busy. When the Pandemic hit his phones stopped ringing, as did everyone's in the art community. Galleries locked down, lifestyle shows closed down and cancelled. Most artist friends used the lock down time to create new art for a market that no longer exists. Art is a huge segment of our economy that's been devastated. So may people are dumping art onto the secondary market that buying newly crafted art has gotten very expensive by comparison. Many don't know what the secondary market is. It can be a crushing place to be. My father invested his retirement money in new art, a really silly thing to do. What was fashionable 40 years is not necessary valuable today. This is how he secondary market works. Like selling a used car to a dealer, you do so at a lower price than retail so the dealer makes money and stays in business. In the art world it appears that unlike cars, the value drops by 75% as you carry the art out the door. If I bought an item for $1,000 the resale price drops by 50% and you get half of that so the dealer can stick your folly on a shelf and still make money when it's sold in a week, or a year. So, buying newly crafted art for investment is a poor choice. You buy new art to enjoy and participate in the experience. You buy used art, made by a dead artist, for investment.

So, I saw Philippe's work and asked if he would do a giraffe bust for my wife as an anniversary gift to celebrate our 48th. I'm impossible to buy for. I contacted the artist and started getting educated on his practices. He creates the clay art at no charge. If you don't like what he produces you move on. Before he starts he makes you aware of the cost in making a ceramic or a bronze. If you select a ceramic he builds it hollow, for that purpose. Solid clay will explode in the firing process. If it's end is to be made in bronze the original is disposable once a mold has been made. It's also a means to make additional copies on demand. Going in I knew that he was planning a limited edition of 6.

Here's https://philippefaraut.com making the giraffe bust.


In our conversations we got to talking about our lone-term spouses and he asked if I would consider a package including a bust of my wife. I was intrigued. She did a life cast by https://www.marcsijan.com in 1989 and I've immortalized her in sculpture before, se we explored that. At that point it was supposed to be a surprise gift. I gathered up and scanned 150 photos of her from the 50 years we've been together. While I don't think she's changed that much he wanted to sculpt her at about half her current age. I have't been married 48 years by being stupid. Surprising her with a bust at 30-ish might not have gone over well, so I brought her in on the process. While I like surprising her, the involvement was a sufficient surprise. This is one of one, but I would not object to someone requesting a copy.

This is astounding. You can see the photos that he used in his demonstration. The change he makes is worth watching. The video goes on to show the mold-making process. The foundry took some shots that will be part of the video.

 

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Discussion Starter #42
The trailer is being delivered Tuesday.

Daniel Brown is delivering the 4' x 6' painting today. Wife is thrilled.

I finished the Frank Lloyd Wright window for the next-door neighbor. They are thrilled. They made great glass and pattern choices. I started the piece before my eye surgery and finished it 2 days later. What a breeze. No difference. I guess I just used one eye for close work. I went to sleep, they pulverized the laser-damaged lens and popped in a new one through a large bore needle. I woke up with 20/40 vision and I was pleased. 2 days later I had, and maintained, 20/20 vision. I just wear one contact now. Even though I'm 68, worked under the sun much of my life, and I'm blue-eyed, I have no cataract in my other eye. This would be life-changing for someone with cataracts in both eyes.

I built a low-voltage light station for an MR-16 Lamp out of junk I had lying around my magic building. Are any of you old enough to remember Felix the Cat and his "Magic Bag of Tricks"?



Anybody need a good gas-powered bucket truck?



It's 20" across the flats of the octagon. I gave the zinc came a black patina so that the grid shows up during the day.



Is it just me or does this look like it's always been there?





Back-lit. I've offered to make one of these for a $500 contribution to my favorite charity, mittensfordetroit.com.

 

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Glad the eye surgery went well! The stained glass looks great, can't wait to see you tear into the trailer!
 

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Nicely done Barry it looks fantastic.

It does look like it belongs there, the house was just waiting for an artisan to complete it. Interesting how the appearance changes with lighting, in the window picture the central diamond is bright, but in the last picture, with the central diamond being dark I visualize an Eagle with outstretched wings, what a nice addition to the house. And yes, I do remember Feliz the Cat.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Nicely done Barry it looks fantastic.

It does look like it belongs there, the house was just waiting for an artisan to complete it. Interesting how the appearance changes with lighting, in the window picture the central diamond is bright, but in the last picture, with the central diamond being dark I visualize an Eagle with outstretched wings, what a nice addition to the house. And yes, I do remember Feliz the Cat.
It's actually a stylized Tulip. I didn't see it, either.

Well, I had more fun today than one old guy should be entitled to. The two of us had a blast.

No one understands how I think. I have no inner voice, I have no "mind's eye" and I'm not a linear thinker. I don't hear any voices telling me my next steps, it just comes to me from what I call the "ether". I also have no facial memory. I always recognize my wife, but of she leaves the room I can't picture her face. I guess I'm a "big-picture" thinker and the periphery thoughts don't even register.

When Gary showed up at 10:00 I was ready to go to work. I had a plan. I needed to make it safe to work under. The front leveling jack wasn't working at all, though in this 2017 photo they both worked fine.



Gary worked in the telecommunications industry in more a management capacity, but has decent tool-handling skills while my last helper never changed his own oil.



My first instinct as an electrician was to check for power. We had 12 volts. By process of elimination I tried swapping switches and both switches were good, but they both stuck. It kinda led you to believe that it was some kind of automatic feature when what was happening was that the automatic circuit breaker was tripping each time the switch stuck in the up or down position. I did some quick research and found that the seized lift had a common problem of the switch causing the unit to bind, in either direction. I suggested that no amount of contact cleaner is going to clear up the problem without taking the switch apart. I suggested that it may be more cost-effective to simply buy new polarity-switching rocker switches. That's how you reverse the rotation of a DC motor, simply switch the leads. They will be in Saturday.

When Gary operated the switch for the working rear jack I got that sick feeling in my stomach that something was going to break. I stopped him in time. Today we took the working unit off and cleaned and lubricated all the proper points. It showed no sign of ever being lubricated, even from the factory. With them using it as a park trailer they had no need to even think about the lifts, until they had to move it. Since only the electric tongue jack was holding it up I was loath to work under it. We got the rear one working fine and installed it on the front to take the load off the spindly tongue lift.



I used the manual winder on the shaft and broke both ends of the roll pin the tool moved against. I used a cam-operated stud remover and heard it break the rust ring that seized it. I worked it back and forth and hooked it up to my Lithium jumper battery and it started working. We thoroughly cleaned and lubricated it and put it back in action. I punched out the roll pin and will replace it.



I wore out Gary. I surprise everyone that ever works with me. I just go at it. Can't explain it.

Tomorrow we remove the damaged ladder and trim. I had Gary buy a vibratory saw like I had Tom buy for his trailer. Tomorrow I'll show him how it works when we cut away damaged metal. I find it incredible that I can't carry a glass of water in my right hand without sloshing it all over the room, but Gary will attest that simply putting a tool in my right hand makes a solid connection that lasts for a while. I didn't shake at all. I guess I'm not your average PD patient.

 

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This thread is great. I absolutely love that stained glass. I'd love to "buy" one for my wife if I could just find the right place for it...hmm...
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Today was the big reveal. I needed to remove the smashed material to see the actual structural damage. This looks pretty bad.





I couldn't guarantee that new ladder would go back in the same place so I removed the top curved section below that mounting point. I attached a steel stud to the back wall to act as a guide to cut the FRP, fiberglass reinforced panel. It's about 1/8" thick. I had Gary buy a new Dremel saw and taught him how to use it. It's a great tool for controlled cuts.







It didn't get any better looking as I peeled back the layers.





The vibrating saw worked incredibly well on removing globs of sealant that sealed remarkably well. This is a very nicely built trailer.

I can tell how this trailer was built by this reveal. The doubled rectangular aluminum tubing is pretty substantial. There is extensive use of styrofoam. The walls use it for insulation and sound deadening while the roof uses it as a structural member. The laminated roof panels are a 1/4" high-quality plywood bonded to about 3" of higher density Styrofoam bonded to some type of alloy sheet metal. I've seen this kind of construction before and it's very strong and energy efficient. The ends of the panels sit on and attach to the aluminum grid work of the sides. I probably shouldn't jump up and down on it, but it didn't move much with me on it.

The tree dented the rafter and drove it down about 3".



The welds held up fine.



Here's the structural damage.



The side FRP is a thinner glass panel with a thin plywood substrate. It it were aluminum I could straighten it out. I think I'll have to remove some to straighten this beam. I'm thinking about using the hydraulics of my hilo working against the weight of the trailer.

 

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Discussion Starter #48 (Edited)
On closer examination there was already a crack in one of the folds.



I needed to expose the other side of the kink.



Using my come-along attached to the building rafter I applied upward tension and massaged the metal and re-formed a rectangular tube of that mess.



I got it to 1° of being straight and the crack expanded, but that allowed me to bend it straight. I drilled a few holes which allowed me to use a drift punch to punch out the indented metal on the other side.



I really don't want to TIG on this. Too flammable and too risky for this repair. I'm having an .035 sleeve bent to cap the broken plate. I'll probably epoxy and carriage bolt it in place. Opening up the side revealed that I will be able to slip in a one piece bendable plywood panel to replace the two sections destroyed in the crunch. I'll have Gary check to see if we can get a sheet of the prefinished material. Everything is nailed, screwed or stapled into the aluminum. I will say that the staples and nails were difficult to remove, making them a decent fastener. The screws are all standard square drive screws used in the industry. They are far less susceptible to stripping, over Phillips.



My next step is to cut away the plywood on the rest of the ceiling of the closet.
 

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Discussion Starter #49 (Edited)
I spent a couple of hours pondering and planning. I've devised a way to get the closet ceiling panels in place. When I removed the chunk of damaged side panel it revealed a space between the wall top and the roof structure that the ceiling material was ripped out of.

Note the ceiling panel The other end was shattered. I will be able to vacate that space snd slide a new panel in through the same gap now exposed on the other end. The lower curved pane will slip into place and bent over and butted up to the existing paneling. I would just have to fashion and new side panel to replace the crushed one.



With key elements back in there proper alignment I can proceed with removing a section of the structural roof paneling.



This picture might be a little hard to decipher. The stressed engineered roof panel is made of a high grade plywood glued to 2 1/2" thick sheet of styrofoam insulation. Glued to that are sheets of thin galvanized strips of steel in a latticework that allows walls and cabinets to be screwed to the ceiling firmly. Attached to that is a full sheet of thin vinyl wrap over a luan base. Line up (8) 4 x 8 sections and you have a finished 32' roof and ceiling as an assembly They used the same vinyl material to make the strips that covered the gaps.

In the lower right you can see the wall of the closet below. I need to cut the paneling above that wall about 3/4" back from that wall to all the new panel to slip into that gap.



I need to peel the roof on the other side back far enough to cut away the roof panel in a straight line. I'll have to cut it into 6" squares to minimize the grip that the wood has on the styrofoam. The styrofoam will be removed giving me access to cut the metal and remove the paneling.

Note the curve on the far end.



Once the paneling, foam and metal are out pf the way I've devised a way to get the new panel on place.

This is the same gap I pointed out earlier. The new panel will slide through to the other side.

Once the paneling is in place the new brace will be installed.



I cut what I thought was just a J-channel as a gutter. It turns out that it is a gutter but it's also the fitting for capturing the awning. It was discharging water right over a hatch. I cut the channel off where it will just drip on the ground.



I cannot restore the strength of the section of stressed panel I have to remove. I will attempt to duplicate the panel with sheet metal. adhesives, and strong plywood, but in no way would I be able to duplicate the strength. Knowing that the original FRP curved skin would be the weak link I came up with the idea of capping the "repaired" panel with diamond plate perfectly bent to match the original curve. Bending the panel in that manner adds a huge amount of strength to the curve. The new panel covers the roof with an impenetrable structural member that would attach to an original section of roof and on both sides of the trailer and then weatherproofed in traditional manner. I will use stainless step flashing like you would use between sections of wood paneling to keep water out of a the transition from aluminum to FRP.



The owners like the idea. I assured them that it wouldn't stay shiny, likely turning nearly he same color as the paneling, but I could speed that process with a chemical patina.



I'll have the shop foreman from Lyndon Fabricating stop by and make a bending template from the other side. They make delicate curves, not with rollers, but with mapped out bending points that are close enough together to appear to be a rolled curve in a 4' x 8' sheet of aluminum. I believe they use hydraulic press brakes that are older than I am. I will install the new LED running lights using the old fiberglass section as a guide.

 

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Discussion Starter #50
The new diamond plate will end 3" forward of the line I marked. It was instantly apparent that there was a significant slope built into the roof. Tell the truth. How many of you own an 8-foot level?



I found another puncture. We're going to have to closely examine this roof. It looks like an attached limb hit the roof before the trunk and pierced the rubber. Gary is going to swab the whole roof clean so we can look for hole. They typically trap dirt and stand out on a clean roof.



The marked line is where I'm going to cut to remove the rest of the panel so I can have access to the ceiling panel of the trailer. The new diamond plate cap will slide under the rubber and will be sealed using standard trailer technology.



Gary is an excellent helper. Never a squawk about cleaning up my messes.



This was time consuming and necessary. I still had to use a flat bar to remove the paneling in 6 x 6 inch pieces. It had to break the styrofoam as the glue held tight.



It was quite a task to remove the styrofoam, but now you can see what I was trying to get to. The paneling will be trimmed back further.



I never was very good at cleaning up after myself. After a year of military school I rejected tidiness.



This part was crushed on the other side. I'll use this a template. This is the shape of the inner ceiling and outer sheathing. I'll duplicate it's thickness by glueing some plywood together.

 

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Discussion Starter #51
Stainless steel brace, or no brace, I couldn't leave this like this. I was telling Gary that I write about my projects, partially for the entertainment of others, but mostly because it is a big part of my thought process. With no inner voice and no mind's eye I use the photos I take to help me understand the subtleties of what I need to do next. I use feedback to catch glaring mistakes, and I do take every suggestion into consideration, but I let the work take me where I need to go.

This told me I didn't want my name associated with trying to save this due to being scared to death to bring a TIG welder anywhere all this styrofoam. I started thinking about the cars I've built or restored and got to thinking about aircraft construction. It's all about the bracing and proper fasteners.



It had to go. I checked how far back I had to cut to get to square stock. I used the new Dremel saw to make some incredibly fast and straight cuts.



There was nothing I could do about this. The bent rafter transferred some of the energy to the rectangular stock side railand turned it into a trapezoid. I didn't see it before, by the weld was broken, too. Glad I took it out.



They used the same material for the rafter as the side rail. It's lightweight 1" x 3" aluminum with a 1/16" wall. What seems to be available is 1/8" wall. I've made a request of the manufacturer for an exact replacement. I can use the heavier stock, If I need to. I found the replacement ladder, too.

I used my 100-tooth carbide blade to make a new section of the side rail out of a straight section salvaged from the bent rafter.



I made two internal sleeve supports cut out of one piece of tubing precisely cutting them so that they would jamb each other in place as they were inserted into the trailer side rail. One didn't go in as far as the other, but there's a good 6" of overlapping sleeve on either side of the joint.







I repaired the curved section in a similar fashion.



Demolition is now complete. I believe commercial grade pop rivets through the stainless cap and two layers of aluminum will be a substantial splice without any welding.



I duplicated the good rear curve spacer. The inner radius clamps down the inner closet ceiling curve and the outer curved material screws down to the larger radius.

 

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Discussion Starter #52 (Edited)
Getting proper material out of the manufacturer has been like pulling teeth. However, their record-keeping has proven invaluable in getting matching paneling. It has a layer of vinyl that allows it to bend without cracking. It was $28 a sheet, so I got 2 because the transportation to Elkhart and back is $250.00 for me to send someone to get it. Not worthe the risk of having to need a second. The manufacturer usually ships direct to its dealers freight-allowed, but my order for aluminum trim that's 16-feet long and very hard to find 2.5" x 1" x .055 wall, is unavailable through normal supply channels. Apparently, they use so much of it it's milled to their specs.

I did get $111.00 worth of high quality aluminum rivets in various lengths. Unlike big-range pull-type pop rivets these rivets are to be used within a very narrow range. Many of the joined brackets have interior and exterior bracing that I will have to gauge. I sent Gary after some clear white pine to use in reassembling the trailer and I schooled him on the grade I was looking for. He was astounded at what passes for lumber in the lower grades. I had him pick up some foam board so I can rebuild the smashed wall. It will be part of recreating the original construction method. The foam board gets bonded to the outer skin and to the inner paneling with contact cement.



One of the things they wanted me to do was to critter-proof the underside of the trailer. They use a pretty sturdy extruded PVC underbelly skin, but they missed many spots a mouse could easily get into. The way their rib cages collapse they can get through any gap they can get their head through. The also build nests in the hollow exposed tubing of the part of the frame that carries the torque-flex suspension. Many a car has been destroyed by mice setting up their home in a boxed car frame. They constantly add to they nest because they urinate on it and that acid and moisture eats the metal from the inside. The grey water discharge pipe had been duct-taped, but that was just flaking off. Pretty useless stuff.



I use strips of DynaMat I cut on a paper cutter into large bandaid-size pieces that easily bridge the gap, making to impossible for a mouse to chew through the metal and tar-based pad.



Just after Gary left one day I guess I became dehydrated and stumbled and fell. My arm took the brunt of the blow and got pretty ugly before it got better. I was supposed to get a Botox shot to control the PD shake, but the doc said, "Nope!" I believe I've astounded Gary several times that I can go from shaking like a leaf to surgeon-steady the moment I touch any tool.



The splice Lyndon made me is a perfect fit. It will unify the wall/roof connection. This will be held in place with rivets.



Now you can see the gentle curve of the roof. I gouged out enough space in the styrofoam to slide in a 1x3 to splice the roof skin. Another will be installed across the splice between the closet wall and the new ceiling panel, doubling as an anchor point for the sliding closet doors. Once the inner panels are in place and the aluminum rafter is in place my intent is to install expanding foam as insulation and fill the void to structurally stabilize the roof section.



This gives me the opportunity to tell my expanding foam story. When I was young and foolish I wanted to build a wood hydroplane. Every day I passed a boat supply place on my ride to school on the bus. They had a skeletal build of a kit in their front window. When I got kicked out of the house for beating my brother for stealing my coin collection to buy "candy". I moved in with a HS class-mate that was a year older. He had a 1,200 square foot apartment in a nice part of Detroit in 1970. I took the smaller bedroom. His girlfriend moved in, all hell broke loose and I came home to a mostly empty apartment with a bunch of broken dishes and a plaster "Love" statue of an intertwined couple, smashed to bits. I never heard from either one again, so I inherited his apartment and his cat. I moved into the master bedroom and decided that the 10 x 12 bedroom on the second floor would be the perfect place to build a 9-foot by 5-foot hydroplane. It wasn't a bad place to work, but the deep green shag carpet took a beating.

The boat was built. I did a pretty nice job for an 18 year-old and I didn't want it to sink so I decided to fill every cavity with expanding foam. I bought a one gallon kit. I bought a half gallon Pyrex measuring cup. It weighed a ton. My plan was to mix a half-gallon of foam and evenly distribute it. I had no idea what I was about to do. I measured out a quart of the resin and cleared a path so I could walk around the boat. I never got the second quart into the mixing cup and it started growing exponentially. I literally ran around the boat distributing the growing foam as best I could, but it spilled over the sides forming stalactites that firmly attached the boat to the deep green shag. My vision clouded and my breathing became strained as it started raining in the spare bedroom. It was the middle of the winter and the poorly insulated attic made the ceiling cold and all that moisture released by the foam condensed on the cold ceiling and fell in a regular light rain pattern. Gasping for air I rushed to window and cranked the casement window open and the negative air pressure of the building caused frigid air to rush into the room that turned the air to fog. I couldn't find the door. I fell to he floor, like in a fire, but that didn't help. I crawled to the door and stumbled into the living room, exhausted. It took me hours to cut off what attached to the floor and to carve the rest until the outer skin would fit. I mostly fished it, but bought a 190SL that had Fred Flintstone floorpans and an "O" shift pattern. My attention went elsewhere and the boat got flipped over in the yard. A family of possum carved out a condo in the foam and made our dogs crazy, for years. When I moved here 25 years ago I went to move the boat and the only thing holding it together was the fiberglass matting. Mother Nature recycled the rest. She probably did me a favor.

One of the tasks they asked me to do was install a larger flat screen, a much larger tv. While most people would draw up plans, I just do. In the doing the refinement of a cardboard template to a working wood adapter took little time. I'm able to create a 3D object without seeing it it my head. I will turn this over to the metal fab guy and have him make it in 3/32" stainless.





I tested the wood template and it held the weight just fine, but the adapter should be steel or aluminum.

The entertainment center wasn't working properly. A harness connector had come loose, but I did find some aftermarket hackwork splice using wireuts instead of crimp compactors. Gobs of tape doesn't help.



Dot had complained that draining the water heater for winer storage let water into the trailer. I discovered a poor sealant installation that let water run into the trailer. I'm thinking the Dynamat would do a great job making it water-tight. I showed Gary how to clean and lubricate the bump-outs gear and rack system. They are the sort of thing that should be operated every once in a while to keep things moving. The new switches he bought work great. No more self-operating lifts. That was spooky to be working under it and hearing the lift try and work. I think what was happening is the switch would stick and the unit circuit breaker, rated at 6 amps, would open when it overloaded and started again when the bi-metal breaker reset itself. I figured out why water was getting into a storage area, wiping the Honey Do list pretty clean. Everything works!
 

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Looking good.
Curious how you do the expanding foam, my experiences using the expanding foam in a can, haven't always turned out as planned. Tried fixing an interior door that got a hole in it, figured the expanding foam would give it a bit more rigidity and hold the patch in place. End result was a door with a nice bulge, not too bad but definitely noticeable. So I'm' looking forward to seeing your technique, anticipating I'll be learning something new.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
Looking good.
Curious how you do the expanding foam, my experiences using the expanding foam in a can, haven't always turned out as planned. Tried fixing an interior door that got a hole in it, figured the expanding foam would give it a bit more rigidity and hold the patch in place. End result was a door with a nice bulge, not too bad but definitely noticeable. So I'm' looking forward to seeing your technique, anticipating I'll be learning something new.
I had my driveway slab lifted with foam a few years ago. It's difficult to control. The company that did the work no longer does it. Highly profitable, but I'm betting they "bulged" more than a few driveways.

No, I learned from my mistakes. I put very little material down at a time. The force seems to exponentially increase with volume. I'm going to use a commercial 12 board foot kit to start with. For you youngsters that never took shop class a board foot is a 12-inch wide, 12-inch long and 1-inch volume of anything, but is started as a lumber term to describe the yield of a tree. I will avoid gettin the material anywhere onward pressure is a problem. I'll lay down a 4" grid and let it fully harden before laying down a grid between the first pass. I'll build volume for better control. Once the thin wood skin is covered than an even coating over the rest should minimize any interior bulging.

If I were to use foam for a hollow door I would shoot very little material, and add to it after it cured.
 

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This gives me the opportunity to tell my expanding foam story... I had no idea what I was about to do...
:laugh: That's a great story. Mine isn't nearly as funny, but here goes. At some point in college, we thought it was hilarious to do "destructive testing" aka just smashing crap (i.e. discarded bowling ball, broken CRT monitor, etc.) to see what would happen - I went to a college that was half engineers, and our unofficial slogan was "where the men are men...and so are the women" so we had little else to do. Someone had the bright idea that a can of Great Stuff would be hilarious to smash open. You know, expanding foam, propellant, metal can, sounded like a decent idea at first. Cut to me dropping a rock on it from a 6' high balcony...let's say we underestimated the volume contained in one can, and the effectiveness with which the propellant would have scattering it. Everywhere. I was picking bits of foam off of every surrounding surface for weeks. :banghead:

Back on topic, your work looks awesome so far!
 

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Discussion Starter #56
:laugh: That's a great story. Mine isn't nearly as funny, but here goes. At some point in college, we thought it was hilarious to do "destructive testing" aka just smashing crap (i.e. discarded bowling ball, broken CRT monitor, etc.) to see what would happen - I went to a college that was half engineers, and our unofficial slogan was "where the men are men...and so are the women" so we had little else to do. Someone had the bright idea that a can of Great Stuff would be hilarious to smash open. You know, expanding foam, propellant, metal can, sounded like a decent idea at first. Cut to me dropping a rock on it from a 6' high balcony...let's say we underestimated the volume contained in one can, and the effectiveness with which the propellant would have scattering it. Everywhere. I was picking bits of foam off of every surrounding surface for weeks. :banghead:

Back on topic, your work looks awesome so far!
Did you ever see the poor woman that mistook a can of foam for some kind of hair treatment?
 

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Did you ever see the poor woman that mistook a can of foam for some kind of hair treatment?
Oh god, that would be truly awful. It's not fun to get off of porous things. Fortunately, I was clean shaven at the time and had short hair :laugh:
 

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Great work, Barry...as always, thanks for the education.

That fall looks nasty. I once had a spell of sleepless nights, long work days and travel...and probably dehydration...
I was visiting my brother, got to the top of his stairs, blacked out and fell backwards.
Ass over apple cart, but nothing broken....except my brothers drywall.

Can’t believe I didn’t hurt myself.


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Discussion Starter #59
Can’t believe I didn’t hurt myself.


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Lucky, you were. I can't believe I didn't break anything. The bigger they are the harder they fall. I've had worse. I leaned a ladder against a brace in a factory and it was poorly secured. I came down with the ladder on my knees and elbows. I'm surprised, at 68, that anything works.


Lyndon can make the most utilitarian corner braces look like works of art. Seems a shame to bury them in foam, but I couldn't a better way to attach the new rafter. I shudder at bringing a welder anywhere near this trailer. I'm thinking about epoxying these in place in addition to the rivets. Overkill?



 

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I concur, those braces do look good. In the woodworking realm, its is common to glue and screw, so I'd be inclined to glue and pop-rivet if I was doing the repair. Only reason I'd not glue is if I ever though there would be a need to drill the pop-rivets to remove the braces. In this application I think that is extremely unlikely.

Given the amount of foam in the trailer, I concur with the hesitancy to attempt any welding. But I'm curious to know if the foam has any flame retardant properties. Given how much you've removed it would be an interesting experiment to take some outside where it is safe to do so and see how or if it ignites/burns.
 
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