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I've decided to go with an Audi TT Mk2 2.0T AWD. Do the years make a difference on what to get for moding?
As far as I know there is no appreciable difference between the different model years with the 2.0. My suggestion is to find the cleanest looking car as far as the interior cabin is concerned and the exterior paint is concerned AND get the highest miles possible. This is assuming that more miles equals substantially lower price. If you plan on doing a lot of moding, then you will be swapping out a lot of stuff and throwing it away. Therefore, it will be better to throw away less valuable stuff than more valuable stuff. On the other hand if you are only going to do a few modes like a tune and down pipe then get the lowest miles possible.

For example if Car A is clean with 30K miles and costs $4000 more than Car B is clean with 60K miles, then I would go with Car B. On the other hand if the price difference is only $1500, then you might as well go with the lower miles car because the various parts that you don't change out will be better off with drastically less miles.

Truly understanding what your goals are and what you will realistically do with the car should make a pretty big difference in your decision making process. If you have intentions of switching out engine parts like the turbo, then you might as well get the cheapest and cleanest car you can find.
 

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As far as I know there is no appreciable difference between the different model years with the 2.0.
I think there are couple, if we ignore the obvious styling changes over the years...

2011 MY TT's saw the introduction of the "new" EA888 Gen. 2 TFSI engine with Valvelift. Valvelift is a variable valve timing system that is simpler and more efficient than many of the systems offered by competitors. It gives the 2.0T a significant boost in low-end torque, which makes the car much more driveable and improves response even after upgrading the turbo. The Gen. 2 engine is arguable the most tunable 2.0T for the foreseeable future, as with Gen. 3 and beyond Audi is moving to cylinder-head-integrated exhaust manifolds, which provide exhaust gas cooling for increased fuel economy and better emissions control. Note that the TTS still uses the older EA113 technology, and for the Mk.3 TT, Audi is likely to use either the EA888 Gen. 3 or TT-RS 5-cylinder engine.

Another component that varies by MY is the AWD system. I don't know the exact year they switched, but at least 2012 and newer have the Gen 4. Haldex system, whereas earlier models use Gen. 2. The Gen. 4 Haldex system uses an electro-hydraulic clutch actuator that provides must faster torque transfer to the rear, as well as on-demand computer controlled torque transfer even when the wheels aren't slipping. The Gen. 2 system uses an actuator that can only engage and begin transferred torque when wheel slip occurs. The Gen. 4 system isn't the newest (Gen. 5 is out now), but many claim that Gen. 5 is a minor improvement on Gen. 4 to make the system simpler and decrease weight. Some claim that the Gen. 4 system reacts just as fast as Gen. 5, but with the additional bonus that it's more robust and can handle more torque.

So, even though the TT has been out for a while and the interiors/exteriors look very similar, I think the newer MY cars have next-generation powertrain technology that will allow them to perform on par with the new Mk 3. TT when it comes out, while also potentially being more tunable/mod-friendly.
 

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Interesting about the Haldes

I think there are couple, if we ignore the obvious styling changes over the years...

2011 MY TT's saw the introduction of the "new" EA888 Gen. 2 TFSI engine with Valvelift. Valvelift is a variable valve timing system that is simpler and more efficient than many of the systems offered by competitors. It gives the 2.0T a significant boost in low-end torque, which makes the car much more driveable and improves response even after upgrading the turbo. The Gen. 2 engine is arguable the most tunable 2.0T for the foreseeable future, as with Gen. 3 and beyond Audi is moving to cylinder-head-integrated exhaust manifolds, which provide exhaust gas cooling for increased fuel economy and better emissions control. Note that the TTS still uses the older EA113 technology, and for the Mk.3 TT, Audi is likely to use either the EA888 Gen. 3 or TT-RS 5-cylinder engine.

Another component that varies by MY is the AWD system. I don't know the exact year they switched, but at least 2012 and newer have the Gen 4. Haldex system, whereas earlier models use Gen. 2. The Gen. 4 Haldex system uses an electro-hydraulic clutch actuator that provides must faster torque transfer to the rear, as well as on-demand computer controlled torque transfer even when the wheels aren't slipping. The Gen. 2 system uses an actuator that can only engage and begin transferred torque when wheel slip occurs. The Gen. 4 system isn't the newest (Gen. 5 is out now), but many claim that Gen. 5 is a minor improvement on Gen. 4 to make the system simpler and decrease weight. Some claim that the Gen. 4 system reacts just as fast as Gen. 5, but with the additional bonus that it's more robust and can handle more torque.

So, even though the TT has been out for a while and the interiors/exteriors look very similar, I think the newer MY cars have next-generation powertrain technology that will allow them to perform on par with the new Mk 3. TT when it comes out, while also potentially being more tunable/mod-friendly.
I knew about the engine change in 2011 and it is a major difference and very noticeable when driving older Mk 2 models. The Audi official specs on the engine are misleading as the new engine produces more HP and a lot more torque than speced (see the APR web site which shows tests on an unmodified engine with 220+ HP and 290+ torque). That made me eliminate anything older than 2011 when I was shopping last year. I think Audi under-speced so that sales of the TTS were not undercut. The TTS is still significantly faster but the base 2011 really closed the gap. Based on unofficial information, the base TT drivetrain performance for the Mk 3 sold in the US will be comparable to the later year Mk 2 models. I expect some Mk 3 handling improvement however.

I did not know about the Haldex change. Can anyone confirm the MY of the change?

As the years went on in the Mk 2, items that were options in 2008 became standard, such as the LED running lights, etc Also, they stopped offering FWD models in 2010, 2010+ are all Quattro. If you are looking for the least expensive model, look for an early FWD.

A 3.2L 6 cylinder engine was offered until 2010. It's a great engine but was dropped with the intro of the 2011 engine which had equal 0-60 times with better gas mileage and 250 pounds less weight on the nose. However, if you want a third pedal, the 3.2 is your only option and relatively scarce since it was sold with either a manual tranny or DSG and most went with DSG.
 

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Well there you go. Now I have learned some new things about the TT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So far I've been looking around and all the 2012+ models have bad looking interior or I can't find something I really want with the look (Looks as in paint, interior, GPS, seat warmers, etc.) for around 33-34k with miles from 8k-20k and the new 2014 TT is like 42-45k for a complete customization and everything is brand new.. Hard decision on what I want. I'm going to tune it eventually so getting new parts is a hard decision.
 

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Search nationally

So far I've been looking around and all the 2012+ models have bad looking interior or I can't find something I really want with the look (Looks as in paint, interior, GPS, seat warmers, etc.) for around 33-34k with miles from 8k-20k and the new 2014 TT is like 42-45k for a complete customization and everything is brand new.. Hard decision on what I want. I'm going to tune it eventually so getting new parts is a hard decision.
The TT is relatively scarce with less than 2000 cars per year sold in the US in recent years. So you need to search nationally to get the used car you want unless you place a custom order for a new one. Personally, I would not buy a new 2014 Mk 2 with the new Mk 3 probably being sold here sometime in 2015. It took me 6 months of national searching to find the car I wanted at a great price. Part of my problem is that I do not like black or dark gray for paint or interior (they are terrible desert colors) and 80% of TTs come with one or the other. If you are patient, there are so really good deals that will make your shipping or plane & drive home worthwhile. For example, I've seen a few TTRS for sale in the mid-40s at non-Audi dealers during the past year. I paid $34K for a 1 year old CPO TT roadster with only 7K on the ticker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What about the emissions and all of test it has to pass in the US? How does that work because I'm in Germany currently and would love to bring home one from here.
 

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I think there are couple, if we ignore the obvious styling changes over the years...

2011 MY TT's saw the introduction of the "new" EA888 Gen. 2 TFSI engine with Valvelift. Valvelift is a variable valve timing system that is simpler and more efficient than many of the systems offered by competitors. It gives the 2.0T a significant boost in low-end torque, which makes the car much more driveable and improves response even after upgrading the turbo. The Gen. 2 engine is arguable the most tunable 2.0T for the foreseeable future, as with Gen. 3 and beyond Audi is moving to cylinder-head-integrated exhaust manifolds, which provide exhaust gas cooling for increased fuel economy and better emissions control. Note that the TTS still uses the older EA113 technology, and for the Mk.3 TT, Audi is likely to use either the EA888 Gen. 3 or TT-RS 5-cylinder engine.

Another component that varies by MY is the AWD system. I don't know the exact year they switched, but at least 2012 and newer have the Gen 4. Haldex system, whereas earlier models use Gen. 2. The Gen. 4 Haldex system uses an electro-hydraulic clutch actuator that provides must faster torque transfer to the rear, as well as on-demand computer controlled torque transfer even when the wheels aren't slipping. The Gen. 2 system uses an actuator that can only engage and begin transferred torque when wheel slip occurs. The Gen. 4 system isn't the newest (Gen. 5 is out now), but many claim that Gen. 5 is a minor improvement on Gen. 4 to make the system simpler and decrease weight. Some claim that the Gen. 4 system reacts just as fast as Gen. 5, but with the additional bonus that it's more robust and can handle more torque.

So, even though the TT has been out for a while and the interiors/exteriors look very similar, I think the newer MY cars have next-generation powertrain technology that will allow them to perform on par with the new Mk 3. TT when it comes out, while also potentially being more tunable/mod-friendly.
Do you have a source for any of this info about the Haldex system? I would love to know if my 2011 is running a Gen 4 system but I can't find that it has changed during any model year.
 

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Do you have a source for any of this info about the Haldex system? I would love to know if my 2011 is running a Gen 4 system but I can't find that it has changed during any model year.
I made this claim for two reasons: a) the Gen. IV Haldex system was developed after the Mk2 was released, and b) my car has a Gen. IV system.

HPA created a guide to help you figure it out:
 

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I made this claim for two reasons: a) the Gen. IV Haldex system was developed after the Mk2 was released, and b) my car has a Gen. IV system.

HPA created a guide to help you figure it out:
Thanks for this, I'm going to look under my ride as soon as a get a chance. One more reason to stick with a 2011+ if buying used.
 
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