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I recently moved to a new place and the driveway entrance is super steep and narrow. All of our cars barely make it out of the driveway, and with my Golf I have to angle it so much I end up in my neighbor's driveway, which I'd prefer not to do.

Does anyone have any experience with the rubber driveway ramps you can put at the edge? How did it hold up to weather changes? Was it fairly sturdy or did it move while driving over it? I'm also worried about theft since there's no way for me to anchor it down.

The other issue is some seem to be $100 or less while others are over $400. I'd like to keep it on the cheaper end just in case someone does steal it in the middle of the night.

Pics to show the issue. I do have to raise the Golf up but even my brother's stock Golf R has to 3 wheel it to get out of the driveway, and my father in law scraped up his very stock Civic exiting the driveway. The truck itself barely clears.

Wheel Tire Car Sky Vehicle


Tire Wheel Automotive tire Automotive lighting Tread


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Thanks!
 

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If you get those rubber ones... use a roto-drill (hammer drill) and lag bolts (red heads) to secure them. Might want to call the state/city/utilities to have them mark any lines underground.

Neighbor down the way has them, not bolted. Always very crooked, nary functional. I guess you could epoxy them in, but that probably won't hold that long.

Good luck!
 

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Seems like this is the sort of thing one would check out before moving in?
 
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If you get those rubber ones... use a roto-drill (hammer drill) and lag bolts (red heads) to secure them. Might want to call the state/city/utilities to have them mark any lines underground.

Neighbor down the way has them, not bolted. Always very crooked, nary functional. I guess you could epoxy them in, but that probably won't hold that long.

Good luck!
Depending on your city, this might be illegal. Also, I would check to make sure that whatever you use, it includes drainage to keep water flowing through the channel.

The BRIDJIT comes to mind:


I have a similar problem for my track car that sits low, lower than yours, with a very expensive carbon fiber front lip. However, those rubber ramps did nothing to help be because they are designed for rolled curbs, not steep long ramps like my driveway. Honestly though, your driveway doesn't look that bad. How about just talking to your neighbor and asking if taking a wide angle is okay with them? Maybe a case of their favorite beer once and awhile could grease the wheel.

Anyway, to help solve this problem, even with my car, I measured my front lip hight at different degrees of rotation of the steering wheel. For me, the highest my car was full lock. I don't know if all cars are the same, since it depends on your caster and camber settings, but I would bet you could figure that out with a tape measure and a few minutes of experimenting. Everytime I go up the driveway, I approach at a 45 degree angle and turn full lock right before my tires hit the edge of the ramp. The inside rear tire lifts, but I make it over every time (I use either momentum, or rely on the rear LSD).
 

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There's nothing that a couple of bags of concrete mix can't fix.
 

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There's nothing that a couple of bags of concrete mix can't fix.
That solves a lot more problems than driveways... if you catch my drift.
That driveway is built specifically with a water path in mind. So unless you prefer flooded basements do not block it.

You need to attack the entry of that driveway like you're about to parallel park your car. Get one side of the car over it first (2 right side or 2 left side) and you'll figure out the rest.
 

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Extendable lift, like on the back of a moving truck? Add a remote and it flips down, drive on, it lifts you to driveway level. Would be good to keep zombies away, too.
 

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I was renting a house with a stupid driveway ramp like this so I put a 2x4 at the bottom of the ramp in the road. It worked well enough.
 

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I recently moved to a new place and the driveway entrance is super steep and narrow. All of our cars barely make it out of the driveway, and with my Golf I have to angle it so much I end up in my neighbor's driveway, which I'd prefer not to do.

Does anyone have any experience with the rubber driveway ramps you can put at the edge? How did it hold up to weather changes? Was it fairly sturdy or did it move while driving over it? I'm also worried about theft since there's no way for me to anchor it down.

The other issue is some seem to be $100 or less while others are over $400. I'd like to keep it on the cheaper end just in case someone does steal it in the middle of the night.

Pics to show the issue. I do have to raise the Golf up but even my brother's stock Golf R has to 3 wheel it to get out of the driveway, and my father in law scraped up his very stock Civic exiting the driveway. The truck itself barely clears.


Thanks!
Any of your neighbors the type who like to complain about every little thing? If not, any permanent solution here should be an "ask for forgiveness instead of permission" situation...

Lay a 12" ruler across the curb to simulate a 12" long ramp, and note how much space is under it. Should be 2-1/2" to 3" from the looks of it. Subtract an inch, and lay a piece of 1-1/2" or 2" EMT Conduit into the trough of the curb, whatever size fits with an inch of room to spare. Anchor it in with a few Redhead/Tapcon/etc screw anchors on either side, just 1-2" into the concrete so you won't hit any utilities. Quick Crete over that to DIY a ramp. Keep it as short as possible, only on the concrete and not the asphalt, and blend the edges smoothly into the existing curb with a flat trowel.

You'll probably be into this $150 total including tools and buckets to mix the crete. Do it on a mellow evening or holiday to avoid drive-by city workers or tattletales. Block it off with buckets/caution tape overnight until it sets, and don't drive over it for a couple more days.

Otherwise just spring for the best quality rubber ramps you can afford and pin them in place with a few of the aforementioned anchor screws 1-2" into the concrete so they don't shift or disappear.
 

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Raise it.
Fixed.

That's a nasty one. Enough that I wouldn't want a lowered daily if I had to negotiate it. I have one at work that's pretty bad, and it makes me glad I have (just) enough clearance, but even with that I have to take it slowly.

To "fix" it people around here sometimes use a thick piece of diamond plate steel, bolted to the concrete. It allows water to flow underneath it easily, but you'd have to check with your street department, and possibly your HOA if you have one.
 
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