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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi, I have lifted the car and seems all wet on the backside:
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Was suspecting the headgasket but there are wet-spots above the gasket, at intake manifold.
Checked valvecovergasket too, but seems seems ok. Airbox has a pool of oil though:

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So I suspect the oil collects there and goes through drainholes down to the engine.
There seem to be "some" tinybit of oil coming from breathertube. Doesnt seem much but over a month it will accumulate ofcourse:


Not only not good for all the oilspillage but might cause engine to run out of control too.

I will hone & rering one day, but is there something I can do against this short term, anyone has experience with oilcatchcan or plasticcover ?

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Some say oilcatchcans are bad though, becasuse it increases the pressure inside the crank case...:
This Is Why I DO NOT INSTALL AN OCC OIL CATCH CAN - YouTube
 

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What car/engine is this? Oil leaks can be real tricky to locate the source of. I usually clean it up then locate the source.

When I have a leak, head gasket/blow by isn’t usually my fist thought. If you unscrew the oil fill on the valve cover while the motor is running is there a ton of pressure behind it?

I run something like a catch can on my motor and haven’t had any problems with added pressure. Just got to run one that’s big enough for you me motor.


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The plastic oil baffle is a must. Then there is , tee the crankcase pressure into the pcv hose at the valve cover, that is
a factory fix for the 1.5's that got too much oil consumption. The high compression and piston bore wear ends up making a lot of blowby. Amazing how vw's engineers didn't care. Some people just hang the pcv hose down low and let it vent to the atmosphere, lot's of blowby WILL gunk up the head despite what people say about it lubricating the valves.

 

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Oil catch cans in the PCV system is a good idea.
It can not increase vapor pressure in the crankcase, as long as it does not get filled or plugged up.
The idea is to make it metal, not plastic however, so that it is cold enough to condense out water and oil vapor.
A tiny drain hole can prevent it from filling up, if you don't want to keep emptying it manually.
 

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I would put the drain hose to the bottom of the oil level. You will not have to worry about the blowby going up the drain hose [because it's under the oil level]. All other ways above the oil level will allow blowby to push whatever oil in the drain hose back up into the tank.

I installed an oil separator on a Mercedes and used a banjo bolt instead of the oil drain plug. I normally suck oil out of a Mercedes during an oil service so I never had to touch the banjo bolt. Sadly, the engine did not last too much longer so it got a newish engine. Then I fired the client.
 

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I installed an oil separator on a Mercedes and used a banjo bolt instead of the oil drain plug. I normally suck oil out of a Mercedes during an oil service so I never had to touch the banjo bolt.
Just to clarify, the banjo bolt was for oil drain plug on the engine oil pan, to connect the drain line from the oil separator?



I would put the drain hose to the bottom of the oil level. You will not have to worry about the blowby going up the drain hose [because it's under the oil level]. All other ways above the oil level will allow blowby to push whatever oil in the drain hose back up into the tank.
Good idea. On another make of engine I also build, the factory crankcase vent has something of a primitive oil separator design which is tied into a metal tube that extends down below the oil level for the excess oil to drain into....same logic as you described. It seems to work fairly well until the engine wears enough that there is a lot of blowby. At that point it will still push some oil or oil vapor up and out. That's on a normally aspirated gasoline engine.

I wonder. On a turbo diesel engine, with considerably more crankcase pressure, would this principle still work the same? Or would the internal pressure be enough to push oil up the drain line and back into the oil separator/catch can?
 

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Yeah, the hose to the the hole where the drain plug is attached to. A banjo fitting and bolt will allow that to happen without any modifications to the oil pan.

Pretty simple to figure out. If you really want to go hog wild, you could use a metal line soldered to the banjo fitting and routed the line higher than the oil level. Less likely to cause problems.

I know some catch cans are probably worthy of the install but I feel most are installed because they are trying to get a few more hours on an engine that should have been rebuilt years ago.
 

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Gas/ diesel/ turbo/ no

Blow by is from piston ring seal
Period.


It’s not about making a better crank case vent.

That is called a bandaid.
Addressed a symptom.

The disease is compression leaking from a worn out bottom end.

Any crank case vent should be connected to the intake to have fumes sucked into motor.
This increases horsepower and reduces bad things in the oil.

Venting breather catch can is actually worse than stock.

And like I said. Does not address the problem.

Of your engine.
Being worn out.
Inside.

Engine spitting oil out is from compression leakage.
Focusing on the breather system is misguided.
You’d be amazed how well these can run with stuck rings.
And with a catch can you watch you can run indefinitely.

But the problem is the engine.
Not the crank case vent system.
 

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I eventually hacked a pcv puck from the ALH engine in there
A 1.6td puck with the correct valve cover would be better.
I think all it really does is restrict some of the flow out of the valve cover and
let more pcv vapors go out the main hose where it more time to condense
and drain back into the crankcase.
However it works, this really reduced the oil getting into the intake until I got
another engine (for other reasons).


\
Things like oil catch-cans and "cold air" intakes seem like inventions from people that aren't engineers.
The old mercedes 617 diesels had a venturi pcv system built into the air cleaner that drained down into the oil pan. A lot of people tossed that factory air cleaner for a fancy "cold air intake" that just sent the pcv vapors straight into the turbo. Be mindful of what you really need.

btw, I'm not an engineer. I just fix my own car because shops charge way too much for how little they know about these simple cars.
 

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I've had a few comebacks where I forgot to hook that oil drain at the air filter housing.

Some BMW 6 cylinders have an oil separator that has a drain hose to the dipstick tube. Those tubes can plug up and cause a bunch of consumption issues.

Fastinradford is right. A stock system should be able to handle a stock engine blowby. Once the blowby gets excessive, the stock system gets over loaded. A catch can may get you a few more miles down the road, but the real problem is that the engine has problems or is worn out.

Sometimes I feel the factory could have done a better job. The plastic cam shield, on the hydraulic heads, did help with the oil not getting into the intake on the mechanical heads. I've thought about increasing the ventilation on my gas turbo, but that is as far as I have gone. I really do not have a problem....yet.

If you throw a turbo on a stock engine [gas or diesel] you should address the additional blowby that will occur. Maybe the stock system will work but maybe it will not. Just something to think about when you are increasing the power past the stock levels.
 

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Gas/ diesel/ turbo/ no

Blow by is from piston ring seal
Period.


It’s not about making a better crank case vent.

That is called a bandaid.
Addressed a symptom.

The disease is compression leaking from a worn out bottom end.

Any crank case vent should be connected to the intake to have fumes sucked into motor.
This increases horsepower and reduces bad things in the oil.

Venting breather catch can is actually worse than stock.

And like I said. Does not address the problem.

Of your engine.
Being worn out.
Inside.

Engine spitting oil out is from compression leakage.
Focusing on the breather system is misguided.
You’d be amazed how well these can run with stuck rings.
And with a catch can you watch you can run indefinitely.

But the problem is the engine.
Not the crank case vent system.
I don't think anyone is disputing what actually causes blow-by or what the perfect solution should be for it. Yes, ideally every vehicle will have a fresh new engine with little blow-by. However even then, any engine has some blow-by; there is no such thing as a perfect 100% seal of piston rings as they move up and down the cylinders. Modern engines with newer technology and materials certainly have less blow-by, but they still have some. That is why the factories add controls to capture it. They would not do so if it did not exist. Furthermore, here we are talking about engines that were engineered in the 70's with older technology and design. And now they are vintage, low value, hobby cars. It just isn't practical to constantly rebuild their engines to keep blow-by at a minimum. So the discussion is more about how to prevent any existing blow-by from contaminating the engine internally (through the induction system) and/or contaminating it externally with oil vapor. Call it a band-aid if you like, but it is the practical solution for a minor issue that simply may not warrant a "proper" (and expensive) fix. ;)
 

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Sometimes I feel the factory could have done a better job. The plastic cam shield, on the hydraulic heads, did help with the oil not getting into the intake on the mechanical heads. I've thought about increasing the ventilation on my gas turbo, but that is as far as I have gone. I really do not have a problem....yet.

If you throw a turbo on a stock engine [gas or diesel] you should address the additional blowby that will occur. Maybe the stock system will work but maybe it will not. Just something to think about when you are increasing the power past the stock levels.
This is exactly where I was coming from in my prior comments (post #10). Even a relatively fresh engine with a turbo added will experience more blow-by than I'd like. It builds up in a catch can and if not controlled can cause excessive crankcase pressures. For a turbo build I'm working on (non-VW engine), I found a nice oil/vapor separator that was designed for large diesel engines. And I was thinking about how to set up the drain line to make it easy to empty the can when needed. However it would be ideal to have it drain back into the crankcase instead. After reading earlier comments and thinking about it, I do recall some other vehicles that did that from the factory.

On a different note, I'm not a fan of routing the engine vent into the induction system. It builds up internally and creates too much carbon and gunk over time, even on stock engines in good condition with the factory PVC systems. I realize it is done that way for emissions control but I've never liked the way most manufacturers do that.
 

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This is exactly where I was coming from in my prior comments (post #10). Even a relatively fresh engine with a turbo added will experience more blow-by than I'd like. It builds up in a catch can and if not controlled can cause excessive crankcase pressures. For a turbo build I'm working on (non-VW engine), I found a nice oil/vapor separator that was designed for large diesel engines. And I was thinking about how to set up the drain line to make it easy to empty the can when needed. However it would be ideal to have it drain back into the crankcase instead. After reading earlier comments and thinking about it, I do recall some other vehicles that did that from the factory.

On a different note, I'm not a fan of routing the engine vent into the induction system. It builds up internally and creates too much carbon and gunk over time, even on stock engines in good condition with the factory PVC systems. I realize it is done that way for emissions control but I've never liked the way most manufacturers do that.
But if you aren’t sucking the air out.
You will have more pressure inside the crank case.
And make less horsepower.

Nothing gets ‘clogged up’
And a few oil droplets on the intake can really arrest wear.

People pay good money for engineered top cylinder oilers.

Not to mention that you are basically creating a -second hand smoke/ type of emissions situation.

Where toxic gas is being emitted in front of your person.

The only acceptable reason against crank case to intake is - it could make a run-away.




And yes as all engines have ‘some blow by’
Picture this: several years ago I decided I needed a catch can.
It would put a bit of oil in there. Nothing too crazy.

I took my pistons out and had stuck rings.
I unstuck the rings and honed and haven’t had a tablespoon of oil build up in the catch can in- going on 3 years. It’s dry in there.

It’s a cop out to say ‘all engines have blow by’

If it’s pushing oil up the dipstick it needs work.
Or- I mean some people are extremely lazy and or against taking apart something they believe is functioning to a good enough degree.

But… you’re selling yourself short
Because all that blow by.
Is. Literally.

Power. You are losing.
 

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Here is the “catch can” setup I made for my 1.9 1z mtdi. The air/oil separator is an OEM BMW part that I think comes on some of their gas turbo motors.

At the bottom of it I have a tube that goes to an aluminum can I made with a drain plug. The motor has 330k+ miles and very little blow by considering. After 1000 miles maybe a couple drops of oil have accumulated in the tube leading to the can. The can itself is dry at this point.



I have a clear tube going to the intake so I can see if any oil is getting through and it’s pretty much 100% clean of oil.

I’m in the process of making a custom CCV valve so I don’t have that 180° bend in the hose. I’m going to make it out of aluminium also with the outlet facing the correct direction. Probably going to put some baffles in it to help take some oil out of the air before it even makes it to the separator.



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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Power. You are losing.
I agree fully with you, as mentioned before these are my compression numbers (in bar, cold engine):

Cylinder 1 24
Cylinder 2 26
Cylinder 3 23
Cylinder 4 27

According to diesel manual, this is what's needed (so all cylinders are below that)
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I'm just buying some time until I have enough money to hone & re-ring, and in the case that fails (or damages engine) have enough spare to buy a new engine:
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The 1z has everything, ecu, intercooler etc. But I need space to install it.. Thanks for all the tips =) I'll go for catchcan, even if it loses some power for short term, longterm rehone or new engine if that fails.
 
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