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We're seeing the GBP down to only $1.09 now from $1.38 back in October of last year and as high as $1.71 in summer of 2014. So does this have anyone thinking about what UK cars you'd like to import now at a 20% or more discount from what they'd have cost you a year ago?

I still think the first gen Elise is one of the most timeless cars, at least in terms of styling. The engines may be trash and I wouldn't fit in one, but just such a modern/retro classic style in a way that they walked away from in the refreshes that followed.

I always loved the big round headlights that made me think of the old Bugeye Sprite from back in the day, but the Series 1 was from before they exported the Elise to the US.

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YES!!! I've been watching the slide and wondering if the opportunity is there. I'm actively looking at Toyota GT-Four, Ford Escort, and Ford Sierras. The rust that is common in the UK turns me away from a lot of them. The inflated Pound really turned me away but I'm liking the current trend.

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This is the best form of convertible arbitrage. That said have the prices of goods in the UK remained numerically the same as the GBP falls in value? I would image those numbers have risen thus negating the advantage. That said if I was in the position to buy some British goods it would be the following..
-2000 Mini Cooper aka the last of the OG Mini
-Another Brompton bike, might actually consider this one irl
-Land Rover Snatch
-Ariel Atom (FYI it came out in 2022 so buy and hodl until 25 year rule hits)
 

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Probably some good deals but I'm really not mentally prepared for RHD. Maybe for a track car though?
I just came back from a 1K mile rally in NM/CO with a RHD car and I actually think it's better for sporty driving (in a LHD country). In the twisties you can see further around left turns because you're on the outside and on right turns you hit the apex every time because you're going right over it.
 

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Probably some good deals but I'm really not mentally prepared for RHD. Maybe for a track car though?
There are LHD cars in Great Britain, too. Getting a car from the continent isn't very difficult, so you might be able to find what you're looking for in England that's originally from elsewhere in Europe.
 

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Probably some good deals but I'm really not mentally prepared for RHD. Maybe for a track car though?
agreed
RHD for a fast fun car would be a pass
our silver shadow was RHD and was fine since it moved at its own pace, but for something fun that you might actually look to pass people in - no thanks

a slow RHD offroader, maybe. a slow luxo boat like the shadow, maaaybe. but a performance car. nope

ive been half heartedly looking at defenders for a few years, maybe further erosion/slow down of old car stuff and BaT hype dying down, plus the slower brit economy might finally make this a time to buy. but my guess is most of the people shopping in that market for their beach house beach cruiser arent too impacted by any of those things.
 

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agreed
RHD for a fast fun car would be a pass
our silver shadow was RHD and was fine since it moved at its own pace, but for something fun that you might actually look to pass people in - no thanks

a slow RHD offroader, maybe. a slow luxo boat like the shadow, maaaybe. but a performance car. nope

ive been half heartedly looking at defenders for a few years, maybe further erosion/slow down of old car stuff and BaT hype dying down, plus the slower brit economy might finally make this a time to buy. but my guess is most of the people shopping in that market for their beach house beach cruiser arent too impacted by any of those things.
I've seen people come up with "RHD kits" for Beetles. They'll cut out the dash, remove the pedals, footrest, pitman arm, and all of the other parts unique to RHD cars and sell them to Americans who just have to be different. I think it's dumb. Of course if they truly wanted to be different I'd suggest not starting with the highest volume production car in the history of the world, so there's that. :unsure:
 

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TBF there's a lot of room to be different in the air cooled VW world. I've had over 30 of them and no two were alike. I've even had a RHD Type 2.
 

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ive been half heartedly looking at defenders for a few years, maybe further erosion/slow down of old car stuff and BaT hype dying down, plus the slower brit economy might finally make this a time to buy. but my guess is most of the people shopping in that market for their beach house beach cruiser arent too impacted by any of those things.
Heh, let me know if you want to go halfsies on a shipping container. Defenders are like F-150s over there, plenty are available in all conditions including a lot of cheap ones. Our plan was basically to get a cheap roller, restore the chassis and drop in the V6 TDI running gear from a Touareg (which I think I can get working with the MT from a 958 Cayenne!).

agreed
RHD for a fast fun car would be a pass
our silver shadow was RHD and was fine since it moved at its own pace, but for something fun that you might actually look to pass people in - no thanks

a slow RHD offroader, maybe. a slow luxo boat like the shadow, maaaybe. but a performance car. nope
I certainly wouldn't want to daily one; while I do think you get used to it as a driver, other drivers and pedestrians and even your own passenger friends are definitely not used to it. In our case the Defender would largely be a show car--RHD adds value there--and occasionally a wheeler in which case I expect it will make little difference.
 

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Something disappointing like an ID.5. I just can't do the whole "cool car I only drive like once a month" thing and I can't think of any cool motorcycles they got in the UK that we didn't get here.
 

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Someone should import this! LHD 1996 Peugeot 106 Rallye at £10,990: 1996 Peugeot 106 Rallye Beautiful LHD Mediterrnean Import...

I've heard these are really fun to throw around.

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EVO Mag said:
Light, sharp, fun, the Peugeot 106 Rallye is a hot hatch in the classic vein that can still show modern rivals a thing or two

…the 106 Rallye may well be your best way to sample Peugeot at its hot hatchback peak

Peugeot 106 Rallye in detail
One word describes the creation of the original 106 Rallye: Homologation. The sub-1300cc class was big business back in the early 1990s, but Peugeot’s sporty 106 XSi just missed out on complying with the rules, owing to its 1.4-litre capacity.

The solution was simple: drop a 1.3-litre version of Peugeot’s venerable TU-series four-cylinder behind the nose instead. The eight-valve, single overhead camshaft unit featured a high-compression cylinder head, dedicated intake manifold, and a suitably mountainous camshaft to enable 100bhp at a lofty 7200rpm. Unlike its 205 Rallye predecessor, which featured a pair of carburettors, the Rallye used Magnetti Marelli fuel injection.

The Rallye’s basic suspension layout matched that of the XSi, with struts up front and a trailing arm and torsion bar layout at the rear (a classic Peugeot setup). Springs and dampers were shared with the XSi but thicker anti-roll bars gave the Rallye an even more aggressive setup.

5.5x14in Michelin steel wheels - one of the Rallye’s most distinctive visual features - hid front discs and rear drums, while Rallye buyers had the option of white, red or black paintwork [I think this blue was a continent-only color?]. Equipment levels were sparse, but a red interior carpet and three-spoke steering wheel - with a set of red seatbelts - gave off the correct vibe. Plenty of Rallye buyers would quickly remove them anyway for Group N and Group A competition.

What Rallyes lacked on paper, both made up for on the road. S1s are the more raucous and for some the more fun, with a high-revving engine and featherweight feel that would never be possible in modern equivalents. S2s are a little more liveable owing to their greater torque. Both provide a rich stream of information to the driver with garrulous steering, sharp throttle response and delightfully swift five-speed gearshifts, while even a lack of power assisted steering can’t hide the agility that comes from such light kerbweights. It’s a shame we’re unlikely to see their like again.

What we said
Rallye S1 vs Citroen C2 GT, evo 064 (Feb 2004), Richard Meaden

‘What strikes you is how alive the whole car feels, from the steering with its consistent flow of granular feedback, to the engine with its razor responses and a glorious, ever-increasing keenness to rev. Its unburstable enthusiasm and manic workrate infect the whole car, egging you on to drive it harder and faster.

‘The chassis is similarly wired, constantly on tip-toe and poised to dart for an apex. You tackle the road in completely the opposite way to the C2, for rather than trust blindly in the reserves of grip and neutral balance, you summon all the information you can gather from your fingertips and buttocks to judge precisely how close you want to get to the more modest but far more clearly telegraphed limits... there’s still magic in the machinery.’

106 Rallye S2 ‘Starter motors’, evo 171 (July 2012), Peter Tomalin

‘Turning off the motorway, the sheer weight of the little Pug’s unassisted steering hits home at the very first roundabout - the clutch is pretty beefy too - and it’s all rather at odds with the stripped-out interior and the rorty, high-revving motor.

‘Heading further into the hills, as the road starts to buck and weave, the 106 comes even more into its own. The ride’s pretty pliant, though the occasional sharp ridge rattles the flimsy plastic trim, and through faster corners a rock of the shoulders locks it onto line - there’s no shortage of grip in steady-state cornering.’
 

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TBF there's a lot of room to be different in the air cooled VW world. I've had over 30 of them and no two were alike. I've even had a RHD Type 2.
Oh, as you know I'm well aware. I was making a point of doing something... not conducive to safe driving to be "different". I'm fine with anything that doesn't compromise the overall active safety of the vehicle, especially since passive safety barely exists in those things.
 
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