VW Vortex - Volkswagen Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1997 Volkswagen golf with a 1.8L, 8v carbureted engine. I've been searching for a while for a street camshaft for my golf and can not seem to find any websites that sell them for my carbureted engine. Does anyone have any suggested websites where I might be able to find it? Thanks:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
same as any hydraulic 8v cam
I think in this case it might be wise to ask just where the poster lives and a little background about the engine. In maybe 70% of the more civilized world this combination would be illegal, 97 automobile with carburettor that is, due to emission standards. Plus a Volkswagen with a 1.8L engine is not as common in newer model, late 90's and on, as they were pre 90's. Could have a solid follower engine installed or who knows what?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am 100% sure this engine is carbureted. I've even went to VW to get a carb flange for it since it is broken, even my boyfriends uncle says it is as well because he used to work on rally golf's in south america when he lived there. I am from Southern Ontario in the GTA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I was confused on what it was, since VW told me it was a carb and I needed a carb flange for it I myself just assumed that it was carbureted. I'm guessing it is a single point injection then? Which basically works like a carb Correct?. I'm a girl so I'm not exactly a wizard with cars, the only other car I've ever worked on is my boyfriends 240.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
Yes, it is a single point injection system called Mono-Motronic. That of course does make it a 1.8L 8v with hydraulic followers. Be very carefull with what you are told by VW partspersons in North America (to a smaller degree here too) as they only know parts programs and nothing really about the engines and their parts. It does look a lot like a carburettor and does use a flange which looks the same as the carburettor flanges used on carburettor engines but it does not work like a carburettor, not even basiclly really. All the hydraulic camshafts for 1.8L 8v engines will fit and work, but I found that the 268 and 270 degrees ones worked best for the street (as with most 8v engines). It might also have a single downpipe setup which would be best if changed to the two into one factory style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
Do you happen to know any well known websites where I will be able to find cams for my car? . . . if I replace the camshafts, will I HAVE to change out all the shims, valve springs ect; ? Or is it just recommended I do?
There are plenty of places, maybe hundreds, that sell parts for these cars and most are good companies. Autotech and TechTonics Tuning are two of the older and better known. I would compare prices, to include shipping as there might be extra taxes due to your location, and go with what you feel is best. There are expensive makes of camshafts like Schrick or Kent and there are cheaper brands like CatCams or the house brands of the above listed companies. CatCams are good and made the camshafts for VW Motorsport before, maybe still.

No, in many cases, often if you like, the factory springs are just fine. If you start getting into a more "race" intended grind of camshaft then custom springs either may or will be needed. The factory springs are fine if the engine is not to old/high milage. If it is then it would be a good idea to replace them as they could be week but you still do not need "high performance" springs. You should replace the followers due to the metal to metal contact and the wear-in patterns causes.

For your engine I would suggest an Autotech Sport 270° camshaft (made by Hör before) as it is less expensive and a good camshaft. It works fine with factory springs. The exhaust of your model should be changed too as you will not recieve the full benefit with that factory exhaust. An exhaust manifold from say the PF 8v engine, dual downpipe and cat that works will help the camshaft to work better. Raising the fuel pressure a little bit also helps with the Mono injection units.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have about 230K, so since I have such high KM's should I change out the valves springs just to be safe? Also about changing the manifold, exhaust ect; is it absolutly necessary to change all of that just to put in new cam's? Thanks for the help by the way, really helps me out! :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,272 Posts
I have about 230K . . . should I change out the valves springs just to be safe? Also about changing the manifold, exhaust ect; is it absolutly necessary to change all of that just to put in new cam's?
Lets look at the whole ball of wax while answering these few questions. What is the bottom line here when changing to a “sport” camshaft? I have to assume it is to increase the performance of the engine as it is not an emissions, economic or fuel consumption benefit. So, just what is the new camshaft supposed to or are we hopping it does? Quick simple answer, to alter the timing of and opening of the valves to allow more air to be used by the engine.

So:
230K is a hand full of kilometers. The valve springs must keep the valve stems in contact with the camshaft lobes (through the followers) throughout the entire engine speed range. If too strong then the motor has to work harder, robs a little power, and the friction between the parts increases, more/faster wear and more power robing. If they are too weak then the valve train starts to bounce as the engine speed increases (often referred to valve float). Power is lost and damage can occur. So if it were my engine with 230K on the clock I would be replacing the valve springs. Must you? No, but you might have to later, only time or testing will tell. New valve stem seals should be done at the same time too. In fact I would really think hard about maybe rebuilding the head as 230K is sure to have taken at least a little toll things.

Back to what we want our camshaft to do, flow more air. If the camshaft has the ability to get more air pumped through the cylinder head, but the exhaust does not have the ability to let that extra airflow leave, the whole idea goes down the toilet. But the camshaft will still work, just not up to what we expected it to do. Lets use an advertising gimmick to explain. Our camshaft is said to gain 8hp in our engine and we don’t do anything to the exhaust, the intake most times needs no help for sport camshafts, to help scavenge the exhaust out. Me may only see a gain of 3hp or 4hp as the camshaft is trying to do its job but can’t because the exhaust is not allowing all the exhaust to exit fast enough. So you MUST not do the manifold and exhaust, but it would be wise. Many people often do the exhaust first as it helps a little right off the bat and then when a camshaft is swapped in the exhaust is already in good shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,771 Posts
I was confused on what it was, since VW told me it was a carb and I needed a carb flange for it I myself just assumed that it was carbureted. I'm guessing it is a single point injection then? Which basically works like a carb Correct?. I'm a girl so I'm not exactly a wizard with cars, the only other car I've ever worked on is my boyfriends 240.
VW quit using carbs in the 80s..

single point fuel injection is NOTHING LIKE a carb..

a carb works on the principle of pressure differentials..

fuel injection is just that, fuel being injected thru fuel injectors..

if you are looking to upgrade the performance of the car, the biggest gains to be had, are when you swap the 1.8 TBI engine out for a 2.0L ABA..

200 extra CCs
real motronic multi-port injection.
ability to get tunes for it
MUCH more upgrade room later down the road
plus, an ABA and the motronic engine harness and ECU can be had for VERY LITTLE money..

last ABA swap i bought, i paid less for the engine swap, then i did for the cam in the swap..

got the whole engine, with a trans attached, for 75 bucks.. the timing belt had given up the ghost..

but, if you are DEAD SET on leaving your neutered 1.8 in there, then you need new hydraulic lifters as well as a new cam, when you upgrade..

the biggest mistake people do, is leave the stock lifters and valve springs in their engine, and destroy their new cam.

do you have any idea what direction you even want to go?

if you just want a nice little boost in power, i would go with a 260-270* cam..

upwards towards 270, they start getting a little lopey, so idle changes, and it makes driving in stop and go a bit less enjoyable..

as was mentioned, the exhaust also leaves alot to be desired as well.. the 4-2-1 manifold/downpipe comes factory on the ABA..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There are plenty of places, maybe hundreds, that sell parts for these cars and most are good companies. Autotech and TechTonics Tuning are two of the older and better known. I would compare prices, to include shipping as there might be extra taxes due to your location, and go with what you feel is best. There are expensive makes of camshafts like Schrick or Kent and there are cheaper brands like CatCams or the house brands of the above listed companies. CatCams are good and made the camshafts for VW Motorsport before, maybe still.

No, in many cases, often if you like, the factory springs are just fine. If you start getting into a more "race" intended grind of camshaft then custom springs either may or will be needed. The factory springs are fine if the engine is not to old/high milage. If it is then it would be a good idea to replace them as they could be week but you still do not need "high performance" springs. You should replace the followers due to the metal to metal contact and the wear-in patterns causes.

For your engine I would suggest an Autotech Sport 270° camshaft (made by Hör before) as it is less expensive and a good camshaft. It works fine with factory springs. The exhaust of your model should be changed too as you will not recieve the full benefit with that factory exhaust. An exhaust manifold from say the PF 8v engine, dual downpipe and cat that works will help the camshaft to work better. Raising the fuel pressure a little bit also helps with the Mono injection units.
Bought a 2.0L ABA motor for my car. Looking into camshafts and was on technotics tuning and found this paticualr one. Would it be a good cam for this motor? Thanks http://http://techtonicstuning.com/...ct_info&cPath=2_13_61_484_92&products_id=1980
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,127 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,127 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hmmm so just the lifters eh. I was told to do everything on my head basically just to be safe like valve springs, head gasket, cam seals, retainers, cam sprocket, valve guides and lifters but thats going to cost me more than the motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,127 Posts
FV-QR

Exactly... Have fun doing all of that, lol. Are you doing a small budget build for a little more fun? Or dropping coin trying to make big and reliable power from an engine that isn't always largely rewarding?

IMO if the valve stem seals aren't leaking (you'd see a blue puff out the tailpipe on every cold start) then they don't need to be changed. To get to them, you'd basically have to remove the head from the car and fully break it down, taking every part out. If you don't have the tools, you'd have to buy or rent them or spend money to send the head out for it to be done by a shop. If the valve stem seals ARE leaking, find a good shape used head that you KNOW doesn't need all the work and keep that money in your pocket.

Its up to you though, if you think its worth it, to me I'd rather just do a mild upgrade with a 260ish camshaft and some new lifters so they break in together and wear evenly. You're going to need to unbolt the cam sprocket from the cam, so be prepared to change the timing belt and timing belt tensioner. Unless you know they are newer and you can be lazy and mark the belt on the sprocket with white out, just line it all back up when you're done. While the cam is getting changed you can easily change the cam seal too.

If you are going to redo the valve stem seals, change/upgrade the valve springs, retainers, blah blah. Then by all means get the bigger cam too like a 270-276. Its just going to hurt the wallet more.

There is a sequence that must be followed when unbolting the cam caps from a head, as well as a sequence to be followed when installing a new cam in a head and proper torque specs. Not following these guidelines will risk breaking the camshaft or the cam caps. Pick up the Bentley manual for your car and a torque wrench or two if you don't have them already. We have a chain of stores here called Harbor Freight, everything is cheap China ****, but their torque wrenches are usually on sale for $10-$20 USD and they're really not bad either. :thumbup:
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top