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From CNBC (link to article):


Michael Wayland@MIKEWAYLAND

The principal chief of the Cherokee Nation wants Jeep to stop using the tribe’s name on its SUVs, saying it “does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car.”
Jeep started using the Cherokee name more than 45 years ago, including on the brand’s top-selling Grand Cherokee SUV. It also offers a smaller SUV called the Cherokee, which was its third best-selling vehicle last year in the U.S.

“I think we’re in a day and age in this country where it’s time for both corporations and team sports to retire the use of Native American names, images and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general,” Chuck Hoskin Jr., principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, said in a statement. “I’m sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car.”
Hoskin reiterated those remarks, which were first reported by Car and Driver, in an interview Monday with CNBC. Hoskin doesn’t expect Jeep to immediately change the name of the vehicles, but he said the Cherokee Nation does not condone the use of the name.
H/O: 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L

2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L

“My view is that a corporation shouldn’t be marketing its products using our name,” Hoskin said. “For the Jeep company, I think they look at it as something they conceived of decades ago, and I think they very much, in good faith, believe this is honoring the Cherokee people. I disagree, and we’ve had this name a bit longer than the Jeep company has. We’ve had it since before recorded history.”
In an emailed statement, Jeep said it is more than ever “committed to a respectful and open dialogue with Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr.” The company said its vehicle names “have been carefully chosen and nurtured over the years to honor and celebrate Native American people for their nobility, prowess, and pride.”
After being contacted by Car and Driver about Hoskin’s statement, several company officials reached out to the Cherokee Nation, according to Hoskin. He characterized the discussions as “good” and “genuine,” but they didn’t change his stance on the issue.

Hoskin said the best way to honor the Cherokee Nation is to learn about its culture and history and “have meaningful dialogue with federally recognized tribes on cultural appropriateness.” When asked whether the tribe would be open to a deal with Jeep to provide royalties or donations from the sale of the Cherokee vehicles, he said such a situation would be “problematic.”
“Financial incentives, things of that nature, to me, don’t remedy the underlying problem,” he said.
Hoskin later said he’s “most encouraged” by the company and its customers potentially even thinking about changing the names. “I’m hopeful over time that things get better.”



Hoskin’s criticism follows several companies and sports teams stopping the use of brand names and logos that used ethnic stereotypes and caricatures. They have included food brands such as Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben’s changing names or packaging as well as Land O’ Lakes removing the image of a Native American woman from its packaging. Sports teams, including Major League Baseball’s Cleveland Indians and the National Football League’s Washington team, formerly the Redskins, are also dropping Native American imagery and names from their franchises.
Jeep has sold the Grand Cherokee since 1992. A new generation of the vehicle, including a three-row variant, is expected later this year. The company first started using the name Cherokee on vehicles in 1974, according to Car and Driver. After discontinuing the Cherokee name in 2002, it reintroduced a vehicle with that name in 2013.
At that time, a spokeswoman for the Cherokee Nation told The New York Times that the tribe had “encouraged and applauded schools and universities for dropping offensive mascots,” but “institutionally, the tribe does not have a stance on” the Jeep Cherokee. She said Jeep did not consult the Cherokee Nation before announcing the vehicle.
 

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The cynic in me wants to ask, "are they getting paid for the name"?

The decent human in me thinks "it doesn't even matter". Def time for Jeep to move on
 

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If Jeep can’t work out a licensing agreement with the tribe, they absolutely should stop using the name.

Jeep Jeremy sounds similar, anyway, and probably matches the intended audience.
😝



All joking aside, this is easily solved by renaming the GC and GC-L as the Wagoneer. The Grand Wagoneer would keep its grandiose name.

Jeep XJ purists hated the use of the name on the current CUV Cherokee. Jeep could call that thing Summit or whatever.
 

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Just call them The Jeep Division SUV and The Grand Jeep Division SUV.
 

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The cynic in me wants to ask, "are they getting paid for the name"?

The decent human in me thinks "it doesn't even matter". Def time for Jeep to move on
Indeed, it's about time for empathetic humanity to prevail.

I live very close to New Echota, last week I drove to a job I had in Anniston Alabama and went through parts of the Trail of Tears Highway...



...it was a gut-wrenching reminder (yet again) of the sad past with hostile transgressions perpetuated by soulless politicians.


“Unworthy Republic: The Dispossession of Native Americans and the Road to Indian Territory,” by UGA history professor Claudio Saunt, was a 2020 National Book Award finalist and has found a place on several best books of 2020 lists, including the Washington Post and The Atlantic magazine. In it, Saunt argues that removal of the Southeastern native tribes was not a historical sidebar, but a critical event leading to the Civil War two decades later.

Saunt’s book demonstrates how Indian removal and slavery have much in common. Enormous profits were at stake in both cases. Both had the support of Southern planters backed by Northern financiers. Both faced an opposition in Congress that remained in the minority in part because of the constitutional compromise that allowed slaves to count in the census as three-fifths of a person, skewing representation. And both involved Southern threats of violent resistance to federal authority.

Twenty years before the Civil War, large swaths of Alabama and Mississippi, and 10 years before that, much of Georgia was controlled by Native American nations. The Creek, Choctaw and Chickasaw nations sat on what has been called the “Black Prairie,” possibly the most valuable farmland in the world at the time.

By the Civil War, those former Indian lands were occupied by almost a quarter million slaves working on cotton plantations developed with financing from Northern investors. In 1850, this land generated 160 million pounds of ginned cotton and 40% of the entire agricultural output of Alabama and Mississippi.

“So, the transformation that the South undergoes in just this really short time span is really extraordinary. And it hinges on the deportation of native Americans, the expansion of the cotton production and slavery across the South,” Saunt said in a recent interview.
 

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Cherokee just woke up, or whatever the kids are saying these days.
 

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Jeep took the "Cherokee" name from this



To this




So maybe it's time to let it go already.
AND this forum hated the name being applied to that vehicle.

Jeep has very recently proven it can do without the Cherokee name. The aforementioned Cherokee CUV was preceded by two generations of vehicles named Liberty.
 

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I live very close to New Echota, last week I drove to a job I had in Anniston Alabama and went through parts of the Trail of Tears Highway...
I live on the actual Trail of Tears. Cherokee Land Lottery plots 242 and 244. I recently found three human graves on my property as well (pre-1837). If Oklahoma can give back a section of land rights to the Cherokee, then Jeep can stop using the name.
 

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Seems dumb to me, and I'm a pretty open minded fella. Half the cities and towns in Wisconsin are named after native Americans. What happens to Oshkosh trucks? Chief Oshkosh was a thing. What about Manitowoc Cranes? Antigo. Waukesha. Wauwautosa. Sheboygan. Oconomowoc. Manitowoc. Mukwonago. Menasha. Neenah. etc etc etc. Better change em all.

I was taught us racism was a 'negative' thing. If someone named a car after me... I mean.. that'd be pretty cool. Would I want money for it? Yup. But if it's super general, and just my last name... idk.. probably not much I could do about it. Especially if it's in a good light, that isn't in anyway negative. If it was a terrible car.. maybe I'd be more upset about it, but when it's one of their best selling vehicles?

I do think they could probably say 5% of all cherokee sales go towards poverty assistance/homelessness with a focus in native american areas and probably come out looking pretty good, but hey, whatever. There's a reason I don't have a job for things like this.
 

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Seems dumb to me, and I'm a pretty open minded fella. Half the cities and towns in Wisconsin are named after native Americans. What happens to Oshkosh trucks? Chief Oshkosh was a thing. What about Manitowoc Cranes? Antigo. Waukesha. Wauwautosa. Sheboygan. Oconomowoc. Manitowoc. Mukwonago. Menasha. Neenah. etc etc etc. Better change em all.

I was taught us racism was a 'negative' thing. If someone named a car after me... I mean.. that'd be pretty cool. Would I want money for it? Yup. But if it's super general, and just my last name... idk.. probably not much I could do about it. Especially if it's in a good light, that isn't in anyway negative. If it was a terrible car.. maybe I'd be more upset about it, but when it's one of their best selling vehicles?

I do think they could probably say 5% of all cherokee sales go towards poverty assistance/homelessness with a focus in native american areas and probably come out looking pretty good, but hey, whatever. There's a reason I don't have a job for things like this.
 
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