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I'm going to say either slave cylinder or clutch master cylinder. At that mileage, it seems pretty okay for those parts to be failing though. New clutch, slave cylinder, and clutch master cylinder should get you back on the road and in good shape. If something like that fails, I always recommend replacing everything in the system to help prevent future failures. You can get full clutch kits with everything needed transmission side for in the $500 range if you're looking to go with O.E. parts. I would replace the dual mass flywheel, at 250k miles I wouldn't doubt that it's nearing end of its life. Valeo has a single mass flywheel kit that's within factory specs and should be right around $500 usd, only thing after that to replace is the clutch master cylinder which if I remember correctly varies significantly in price depending on where you buy it

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Gotta love hydraulic systems. After you fix the line just make sure to bleed the system. There are tutorials on YouTube regarding it. I just fixed my AC not too long ago. It's normally in the 80-85°F range with 70+% humidity where I am so AC is a must have

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That's about how it was for me. Mine was odd though, I checked the fuses and they were all good, thought it was the AC clutch but had to do other work which involved removing the pump anyway. Never changed the pump or anything, refilled the system and kicked it up to try it again and it blew the fuse. Still have no idea what caused it initially, but it works now and works extremely well

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There's really no way of telling unless you can see the odometer of the car it came out of. $500 for a transmission that's under 100k miles is a decent deal. As long as it doesn't leak or have damage to the case I think you'll be in good shape

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If its only a clutch issue, I don't know that I would be buying a new transmission. We had a mk4 TDI with a dead auto at 114k, and we swapped in a manual trans with 100k more miles. Sold the car and the trans had 280k on it with no real issues. The manuals hold up well. I would just get a clutch kit and maybe get a shifter bushing kit as well.

Also, you'll want another TDI trans. The 1.8T has different gearing.
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Only reason I say master or qslave cylinder is my slave cylinder failed once. Couldn't get it in gear with the car on because the clutch wouldn't disengage. But with the car off the shifter would move freely..

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Hi everyone,
I've picked up the transmission. It's in mint shape easy to work with. $350. 80km

He had sold the motor for $1800.
He's a mechanic that was very hopeful, he also said he's willing to help if I get stuck.

He said make sure I check with vw sometime it's cheaper for there kit plus it's oem
Personally, if I replace a clutch I always go with something a bit beefier. If it has a dual mass flywheel, swap to a single mass. Dual mass flywheels are a bit outdated anyway, and in my opinion create yet another possible point if failure

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That's what your using
Single mass flywheels are easier to work with in my opinion. That, and it gives you more flexibility regarding what disk/pressure plate you go with, so more options to suit your needs if you decide you want more power. Realistically though, solid mass flywheels don't need to be replaced as often either. In most cases you can get a machine shop to resurface it within specification and not need a new flywheel. That and I've never seen a solid mass flywheel fail. In a duall mass setup, the flywheel is what is dampened to lower the harshness of engagement and protect the transmission. With single mass it's the opposite, the clutch disk is what retains the dampening springs. In the end, it's up to you and your preferences

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Sachs SRE for single mass flywheel is rated to 360 ft-lbs. The VR6 to 300 ft-lbs. The SRE upgrade-able to 390 ft-lbs with their sintered, 4 puck disc.

For a lightly turned up TDI, I am building with the VR6 clutch. Manufacturer makes a difference; the Sachs VR6 set is 300 vs a competitors VR6, only to 250...
cheers,
Douglas
I'm tuning up a 1.8t right now. Have a DKM MB clutch kit on the way (rated at 440ft/lbs) and getting ready to see if I can find a TDI 6 speed to swap in.

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As long as it's for a 5 speed, and fits what you want to do with the car. The decision can be painful or painless depending on what your goals are in the long run.

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Which one lasts longer?
And smooth!
It's to say that no clutch will inherently last longer than another. It boils down to how you drive that will determine how long it lasts. I've seen stage 3 clutches last 3 weeks and factory ones last 270k miles. It's the driver mod that makes the difference. For reliability and peace of mind with tuning, heavier duty clutches are needed to handle the extra torque. Realistically though, that's the only reason. Long story short, if you drive on them properly you will get good life out of them. If you rag on them constantly, slip them beyond what is necessary, clutch dumps, etc... they can fail early. Driver mod is everything. Proper break in, not riding the clutch to oblivion, and smooth engagements will help any clutch last a very long time

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That just sounds like a clutch adjustment, cable or hydraulic.
The clutch pedal should only have about half an inch of freeplay without much resistance.
All the rest of the pedal to the floor should have full resistance.
If the clutch is slightly not disengaging completely, you should not be able to shift or it should grind when you try.
I do not remember if the 2004 is cable or hydraulic clutch, but I think it was hydraulic.
So then check the clutch master fluid.
Watch the fluid move when someone pushes/releases the clutch.
Could be a bad clutch master cylinder.
They're hydraulic. Pretty sure most of the O2J transmissions used hydraulic slave cylinders..

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The car's alignment is off. I did take many things apart for that to happen. My biggest problem is the shifter, its not working properly. I am shifting in 3rd to go to 1st. I do understand that when I hooked up the newer transmission it already had problems being put back together because of 2 problems I have an idea of.
One I smashed the hect out of the other transmission. To get part 47 out. It was really stubborn. Part number 47.
Also this part was extremely tight when I moved it by hand back and forth(old transmission).
When I first installed it on the newer transmission. It was way tighter.
Then I bought new bushings, and it was a little better. Thought I'm only use one bushing. The other bushing was to tight. And I was hoping to do some tests to see if there's leaks or problem with belt or transmission.
The clutch is way better. Upgrades are worth it.
This is a really good car!
Thanks for all the help View attachment 139720
Whenever I replace a part like that, I grease the pivot point. You'd be amazed what some high temp bearing grease can do...

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