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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For some people in Massachusetts (see other states' lemon laws) whose car has been out of service for a total of 15 days or more AND a final repair has not been performed within 7 days of giving the manufacturer a final chance for repair notice, you might be entitled to a refund on your car. This might not apply here because the problem can be fixed easily by replacing all the coils. But if your car has been out of service for a long time, you might have a case. Please read carefully (some important points are posted below):
http://www.state.ma.us/consumer/Pubs/lemon.htm
Reasonable Number of Repair Attempts: The Lemon Law gives the manufacturer, its agent or authorized dealer a "reasonable number of attempts" to repair the substantial defect. This standard is met if, within the term of protection (1 year or 15,000 miles):
a repair is attempted 3 or more times for the same substantial defect, and the problem continues or recurs within the term of protection;
OR
repair attempts for any substantial defect or combination of defects total 15 or more business days, not necessarily all at one time.
NOTE: A business day is any day that the service department of an authorized dealer is open for business.
Final Repair Attempt:
If the substantial defect continues or recurs after the manufacturer or authorized dealer has made a reasonable number of repair attempts to repair the defect, you must give the manufacturer (not the dealer) one final repair opportunity, not to exceed seven business days, to fix the defect. This seven-day period begins when the manufacturer knows or should know that 3 repair attempts or 15 business days out of service limits have been met or exceeded. This is usually the date the manufacturer receives a final repair opportunity letter from you. You may notify the manufacturer of the final opportunity even after the one year or 15,000-mile term of protection ends.
At the end of the 7 business days, you may pick up your vehicle. The manufacturer may choose not to use this final opportunity to attempt repair. If after the seven business days, the substantial defect has not been repaired, or has been repaired and recurs, you have the right to a refund or replacement under the Lemon Law. If the manufacturer does not comply voluntarily, you may request an arbitration hearing.
 

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Re: Coil packs & Massachusetts Lemon Law (BostonMk4)

quote:[HR][/HR]
I'd say that if it makes the car undrivable, its substantial. [HR][/HR]​

Yesss, but what does the LAW say. It's likely much more defined than a one-word term like "undriveable". On top of that, "undriveable", if that was the term, it would be defined. It's government. It can't be simple.
 

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Re: Coil packs & Massachusetts Lemon Law (Jman5000)

If you can not drive the vehicle it's use IS substantially impaired.
I did not purchase the vehicle to look at, did I ?
Substantial Impairment:
The Lemon Law only covers serious defects- those which substantially impair the use, market-value or safety of the vehicle. The law does not list the defects which are considered substantial. You must be able to demonstrate specifically how the use, safety or market value of your vehicle is substantially impaired by the defect. For example, to prove market value impairment, you must show that your vehicle is worth at least 10 percent less than it would be without the defect. Although a defect may be annoying, it is not necessarily substantial.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Coil packs & Massachusetts Lemon Law (Jman5000)

The time is on your side. Yes, the law says that the defect has to be substantial but it also states that after a total of 22 days (15 + 7) of being out of service AND given the final repair notice to the manufacturer, you might have a case.
 

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Re: Coil packs & Massachusetts Lemon Law (Jman5000)

The key is the term "same substantial defect." If the coilpack fails multiple times ON THE SAME CYLINDER, you'd have a case. But, if the coilpack on each cylinder fails just once and is replaced with a working one that doesn't fail, you're outta luck.
 
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