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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been working on this car for a little bit, So, I figured it was time to finally make a build thread.

Some of you may know me already. My name's Chris, and I'm a founding member of DOG (Dasher Owners Group).
The original one. That one evolved into a newer one, and I'm sorry to say I've just not been as active with it as I'd like to be. Life gets in the way, much like with my Dasher.
I've been working on this particular car since 1998. About 23 year as of this writing.
My car has seen a lot of changes from the original form, and a lot of changes from my original vision of what I wanted.
And it's seen a LOT of down time sitting in the garage for years at a time untouched.
Those days are over.
I'm very much back on this car, and I've had very good momentum in the last year.

This car's story started out with a part search for my first Dasher, also a 1976 3 door 4 speed. I was starting the teardown of my first one, shortly after someone decided to do a U-turn right next to me. The car was pretty banged up.
SO, off to the junkyard I went, looking for a fender, maybe a couple good doors, maybe the whole front end.
I stumbled on my current car, sitting there in all it's glory.
It's doors were good, had no rust in the rain gutters, was real straight, except for a ding in the fender.
Bryan Wilson of Bry's Auto Wrecking would sell me the two doors for $200, or, the whole car for $300.
I drove the car home, no exhaust and a brake caliper dangling from a coat hanger, and started over.
That was the only time I've ever driven this car, 23 years ago.

The only pic I took of this car before the teardown. Yes, the Dasher wagon next to it was my daily driver.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
It's funny how us car guys get swept into thinking that the little gem we just found is better than it really is.
This car had it's fair share of rust. All the usual places. Rain tray, under the hood was rotten. Left fender had the standard rust coming thru from the back side (part of the inside bracing touches the outer skin on that side - they all rust). Right rear lower section behind the rear wheel was rotten.
Long story short, this car was sandblasted to raw steel. Every inch of the outside. The underside was completely stripped of it's undercoating, and suspect areas were taken to metal.
This is basically a rotisserie restoration without the rotisserie.

There is no drain in this spot. There is on the Left side.


I added a drain, same style as the rocker drains.
The holes were used to shoot paint from a syringe from the backside after welding,
to make sure it doesn't ever do this again.






Rust on roof skin, above the supports
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Then the mods began.
All the holes that came on the car have been filled with welded steel.
Side markers, trim holes, and rust holes.
And the engine bay got some attention too.
The engine of choice for this car is a 16V.
I originally took it from an '86 Scirocco. More on that later.
I needed to remove the battery tray, as the distributor of the 16V comes off the end of the head, and would hit.

Since I removed it, I took the opportunity to add back a brace.
I stole one from my 1st Dasher, and changed the curve and straight edges to match the right side of the car.




The battery tray is now a box behind the firewall.
I thought long and hard where to put it. If I were to do it all over again, I'd probably go with the trunk. Back when I started, I had it in my mind to preserve the utilitarian nature of the hatchback. Lol.

I built a little box of steel and added it to the right hand drive version's brake servo location.
this will be for the battery cables to come out. It has a matching oval hole to the heater core hole, and will use the same double hole grommet.



Transmission Tunnel.
Going with a 5 speed, tunnel just doesn't allow this.
Circles are areas that hit.








All better.





It's always fun when you move in the middle of a car restoration.
And that's a big reason the car sat so many years in this current stripped down but painted state.
Winter, 2002.


 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I will be honest, one of the things that sort of kept me from working on the car as much as I wanted to was the paint. I had some issues with the clear coat. This is my first paint job I've ever done, and no amount of reading books or studying prepares you for hands on experience.
I was very happy with the silver, but the clear coat had heavy orange peel. When I got to the new house, and was color sanding the clear, I broke through into the silver in a couple places.
One of the most dis-heartening experiences I've ever had. I was just sick.
So, I continued to sand down the clear, and repainted those areas I cut through, and re shot the clear over the whole car. Much better luck the second time. This was about 2003 or so?

Then it basically sat, while I played with other cars, boats, built a treehouse for 5 years, and raised 2 amazing boys, all while continuing to collect lots of NOS parts.
I never lost interest in the car, just had other stuff going on.

Fast forward to 2019/2020, and I finished color sanding and buffing, got some clear overspray out of the door jambs and engine bay, and finally started on other areas of the car.







Made a big decision to do away with the CIS unit mounting bracket. It will not be needed any longer. I didn't have to, but it will certainly clean up the bay. No turning back now.




 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Suspension.

The rear axle I'm using is from a newer Dasher, I believe it was a 1981.
The trailing arms of the 1976 are 3mm thick, and the newer style is 5mm.
The rumor is that the torque tube inside the horseshoe shaped beam is also thicker.
Also, the new one has more negative camber built in.
This was bought back when you would see a Dasher in the junkyard every once in a while.
Those days are long gone.


I sandblasted the axle, and then shot it with semi-gloss POR. Nice tough stuff.
For some odd reason, I don't have a finished pic of the rear beam. I'll update later.




Someone decided at some point that it was a good idea to use a stainless steel strap around the outer sway bar bushing, instead of just get a new clamp from the yard. This lovely piece of "engineering" cut it's way into the control arm. "Get-'er done".


This was welded up and ground down to original shape.


The control arms and subframe were in pretty decent shape really, so I sort of documented how the original factory markings are, in case I ever decide to go all "Pebble Beach" and put them back. I probably won't, but at least now I can.
Any scratches and dents in the subframe were fixed before painting.






All cleaned up.
April 2020






Lots more to come with the suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Engine.

As can be seen from the above pics and description, the car is getting a 16V.
Can't recall the year, but sometime around 2000 perhaps I brought home a 1986 Scirocco from the junkyard to pull everything I needed. I pulled the engine, left the trans. Pulled all (ALL) wiring. Every inch of it. I originally intended to use everything straight from the S2. Intake manifold and all. I was in for a surprise. The hood sat one full inch high after throwing the engine in the car for mockup.

Where it hit (red arrow)


So I had this nifty little number shipped from England.
Audi 80 16V manifold.



That one was way better, the hood would sit flush, but of course that's not good enough.
I found some lower motor mounts. But like things always do, that led to other issues.
Now I would have to notch the subframe, and maybe even the hood bracing. I wasn't a big fan of either really. So, this is the point where the car basically sat for over a decade with almost nothing done to it.

Somewhere along the line, I acquired a 2.0 complete block. It was in very good shape.
I had the deck cleaned up, and rehoned.
I also took the 1.8 head to Steve Hannaford in Tacoma WA for a Port/Polish job, and new valve grind and seals etc.

I started day dreaming about a different direction for induction, and in 2017, decided to abandon the Fuel Injection idea altogether and bought a set of Weber 45 DCOE's.
Talk about opening a can of worms. (I guess I really like worms).


The hood fitment issue was now a thing of the past. But it's still the 10 pounds of "stuff" in a 5 pound bag problem.

This seems like a good place to insert my engine build thread.
I won't go into a huge amount of detail here about the engine, but If anyone is interested, here's the link.
B1 16V Build, or something slightly different | VW Vortex - Volkswagen Forum
I'll stick to stuff here that mostly pertain to putting this beast into a B1.

I managed to find a super rare alternator mount from a QTD with no AC or PS. Who knew?


In order to use this particular 16V 2.0 Longitudinally, this boss needs to be tapped.




The Audi 80 16V (maybe others also?) uses a strut that goes from a different mount, up to the top of the block. Seemed like a good idea, so I built one. This motor will have just a little bit more power than stock.



I was fortunate to find another rare as hen's teeth piece to the puzzle.
Audi 80 B1 GT or GTE aluminum oil pan.
Of course I wanted to use a windage tray (OEM VW item, from MK3 I believe?)
The tray needed some mods.


The 16V has a few more senders than the B1.
I sourced this from an Audi 4000 if I recall correctly.
Has more holes.


My belt routing. I don't know if this will give me trouble or not.
There is no tension adjustment for the water pump.
I tried several belts until I got what feels right.
If I have issues, I will come up with a small tensioner pulley and needed brackets.
We'll see.


Modified snubber mount, to fit around the QTD alternator bracket.


I decided to go mad scientist on this project and tackle something that's been on my mind for years. What to do with all the bolts and brackets with yellow chromate finsih?
I bought a power source, and all the supplies, and started a zinc plating operation.
After zinc plating, the parts get dipped into yellow chromate, or black oxide solution.
I'm loving it!
I don't get 100% same quality as OEM, but it's way better than sending them out, and better than painting parts that aren't supposed to be.

Original


Plated














Fiat 124 motor mounts.
Much more firm than stock B1.
Now that I'm going with carbs, we're back to stock height mounts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)













All mounted up to the subframe.




This header is from an Audi V8.
This story is far from over. It does not dump in the right spot.
I'm trying to decide whether to just massage this one to get the car running, or, actually start over from scratch and build a header. Ultimately I will be doing that, but I'm leaning towards just adjusting this one for now.


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Loving this thread!

-=Mark
'80 Dasher Wagon
'81 Rabbit Sportruck
'90 VSE JackRabbit
'11 Jetta Sportwagen SE
Thank you! Long overdue. At this point obviously I'm just trying to catch up. Eventually it will be more of an update as I go thing like your thread. I'm looking forward to that.
I can never make up my mind whether I want to do the "save multiple pages and update later" thing or not. lol. Sort of annoying when people do that, but here I am doing that.
For now I'll fill in the ones I made, and when I run out, I'll just add on to the end I think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Transmission.

This is a Quantum Turbo Diesel (QTD) 5 speed transmission. Code 3M.
Should be pretty lively behind the 16V, considering the 3M is about the 2nd most low geared (sporty :)) trannies available for the B1. I happened to just get an amazing deal on a brand new, NOS VW Fox transmisstion, a PSA. Yes, brand new. That one will be slightly taller geared, and is my backup if this QTD blows up. Or, I might swap them if I go on a long road trip.

So, the story behind this QTD still amazes me to this day. Back in the 1900's (lol, too funny), I was at my favorite junkyard, and spotted a Dasher wagon. Being rare, even back then, and always looking for interesting parts, I was checking out the interior. I spotted a 5-speed gear knob. My first thought was, what a tool - who would swap over a 5 speed knob on a 4 speed car. So, I rowed thru the gears, and much to my shock, it was a 5 speed. WOW!
The code on these transmissions is impossible to see when installed in the car. I asked a guy working at the yard about it, and he said come back tomorrow, he'd have the engine and trans separated from the car. I came back, and much to my shock, it was the 3M. The exact ratio I was looking for! What are the chances of that? Couple that with the fact that it was already in a B1, so the mounting was all figured out for me.
So, now I've gotten the car, the engine, the tranny all from the same yard.

Here she is in all her raw beauty. Along with modified mount.




I replaced all the seals, and got it cleaned up real nice.
Then I noticed this. And oil stain that was new, inside the bell housing.
Turns out there was what I have to assume was a casting flaw - maybe an air bubble.
It broke thru, and was leaking. Makes me wonder a LOT of things. Like, was it always leaking? (didn't appear to be).
Are there other flaws that will expose themselves later? All the more reason to have bought the Fox tranny.
So, I fixed the hole. I drilled it out, tapped for an NPT pipe fitting, ordered an aluminum plug with Allen head, and inserted it with some oil proof gasket maker. I'm confident that at least THIS hole is no longer a concern.





Now on to the fun stuff. Linkage. The original floppy rubber stuff was disintegrating.
Time for something a bit more sporting.
I took it apart, and welded in mounting holes for spherical bearings. Everything is now a bearing.
The part that has the pin slide back and forth is now a solid piece of Delrin hard plastic. I milled it out.
All the bearing were purchased on Amazon or eBay. Fun project. It's too bad all this will be hidden.












While I was at it, I relocated the lower strut location to the bottom for a shorter shifter throw, and replaced the rubber mounts with rod ends.


I filled the original wet noodle transmission mount with Polyurethane, but didn't get a pic. It's very solid now. Similar to the Fiat engine mounts and the VW Motorsports front snubber.

Lightened flywheel. From an Audi 4000/Quantum.




Stock VW Fox clutch




MAJOR milestone.
April 2021. Transmission mated to the engine. First time for this block and transmission combo. After 23 years, you can imagine how amazing this felt to me.


 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Progress is great, but a major milestone, that's what really makes me happy.
May 2021.
The engine is IN the car!

I built a wooden cradle to hold the engine/tranny assembly.
The cradle needed to be tall enough to get the engine crane under it all. This meant the car had to be about 35 inches from the ground to the lower edge of the fascia. A bit sketchy, but done very carefully and not in a hurry.
This was a belt AND suspenders sort of deal.





It's IN! I'm just super excited.
















 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
As I mentioned before, using carbs meant that I no longer have hood fitment issues, and I get to use stock height motor mounts. But the carbs still present a LOT of challenges..
Here's one of many - BRAKES.

Stock booster and Master Cylinder.




So, If I didn't plan to use any kind of filter on the trumpets, this might be adequate. But that's just not my style.

I thought I'd try throwing on a Golf Mk2 M/C that I had laying around, to see what that looks like.
Problem solved?


Essentially, yes. The overall problem is solved. Of course using that M/C and booster brings up more issues.
I will go into this more later, with pictures, but here's the basic writeup.
The Golf/Jetta/Corrado M/C is nice and short, which is great, but it is NOT compatible with the B1 Booster. The M/C will not go all the way into the Booster. So, I'm forced to have to use the booster from Golf.
What's wrong with the Golf booster? For one, the back side is not completely compatible for mounting to the car. The linkage on the Golf unit is not adjustable for length like on a B1.
And the overall diameter is slightly larger. That larger diameter is now partially blocking the hole in the firewall for the accelerator cable.
The fun continues....
 

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As I mentioned before, using carbs meant that I no longer have hood fitment issues, and I get to use stock height motor mounts. But the carbs still present a LOT of challenges..
Here's one of many - BRAKES.

Stock booster and Master Cylinder.




So, If I didn't plan to use any kind of filter on the trumpets, this might be adequate. But that's just not my style.

I thought I'd try throwing on a Golf Mk2 M/C that I had laying around, to see what that looks like.
Problem solved?


Essentially, yes. The overall problem is solved. Of course using that M/C and booster brings up more issues.
I will go into this more later, with pictures, but here's the basic writeup.
The Golf/Jetta/Corrado M/C is nice and short, which is great, but it is NOT compatible with the B1 Booster. The M/C will not go all the way into the Booster. So, I'm forced to have to use the booster from Golf.
What's wrong with the Golf booster? For one, the back side is not completely compatible for mounting to the car. The linkage on the Golf unit is not adjustable for length like on a B1.
And the overall diameter is slightly larger. That larger diameter is now partially blocking the hole in the firewall for the accelerator cable.
The fun continues....
Try to find brake booster from an Audi 80 b4. Will fit on your car. It's a little bit thinner but larger in diameter (than stock audi b2/passat/quantum). Maybe could solve your issue. I fitted it on my b2 for better vacuum. Also it has adjustable rod that goes to your brake pedal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thank you, I appreciate that. My trouble now is that the diameter is larger on the Mk2 booster. I do not have an issue with the length anymore, with the Mk2 MC being shorter. The larger diameter is getting very close to the accelerator cable. I will find the cable and install that, and see if it's a problem or not.
 
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