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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

Obviously this website is promoting their own product, that's why they can make such outlandish statements as "You should, as a rule, avoid any cloth material that is not 100% natural. Stay away from polyester, rayon, nylon, and the like." This goes against my experience, and the experience of hundred of professional and semi-professional detailers at the Autopia forums. Surely, there are bad MF towels out there, which is true for any product. And obviously these bad products are not the ones being used by professional detailers. But I repeat, the good MF towels do not need to be made from natural materials, and will not scratch your paint. I wouldn't even consider that an opinion, as it's been tested countless times.
Quote »
Contrary to popular believe, some MF towels are actually made up partially of polyesther/polymers (plastics basically) that are not abrasive, but are not soft either. If you could imagine taking a plastic bag and balling it up and rubbing on your car, it's like that.

That isn't contrary to popular belief. All of the popular MF towels are made from a polyester mixture. The very website you linked to even says that polyester MF fibers can be soft yet abrasive. (which I don't necessarily agree with) The plastic bag analogy isn't even close to being true.
Quote »
A word on Micro Fiber Towels: be very cautious of which ones you buy before using on paint. Look for MF towels that are DESIGNED to be used on cars. and that say they are 100% Cotton Terry cloth.

If you would just remove the bolded part, then I would be happy. Let's not turn the thread into an argument, because this isn't the place for it. The basic problem is that you would like to steer people away from ALL MF towels, and only use 100% cotton. You are misrepresenting MF towels, and a F.A.Q. is the worst place for misinformation. I say there is absolutely no need "just be on the safe side" and steer clear of all MF towels.
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (Triumph)

Quote, originally posted by Triumph »
Obviously this website is promoting their own product, that's why they can make such outlandish statements as "You should, as a rule, avoid any cloth material that is not 100% natural. Stay away from polyester, rayon, nylon, and the like." This goes against my experience, and the experience of hundred of professional and semi-professional detailers at the Autopia forums. Surely, there are bad MF towels out there, which is true for any product. And obviously these bad products are not the ones being used by professional detailers. But I repeat, the good MF towels do not need to be made from natural materials, and will not scratch your paint. I wouldn't even consider that an opinion, as it's been tested countless times.

I didn't buy from that website. I actually purchased my towels before looking up a website - I just posted that in reference to answering a question and recommended people look online and look around. I said I bought mine at Costco. http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
Quote, originally posted by Triumph »
That isn't contrary to popular belief. All of the popular MF towels are made from a polyester mixture. The very website you linked to even says that polyester MF fibers can be soft yet abrasive. (which I don't necessarily agree with) The plastic bag analogy isn't even close to being true.

You're right, that sentence seemed a little off.. It didn't turn out the way I meant it to. What I meant was that most people think that all MF towels are very soft, when indeed there are some that have more polymers and are better for cleaning and not good for paint. Thanks for pointing that out (as you can see from my FAQ, I was typing a lot!
)
Quote, originally posted by Triumph »
If you would just remove the bolded part, then I would be happy. Let's not turn the thread into an argument, because this isn't the place for it. The basic problem is that you would like to steer people away from ALL MF towels, and only use 100% cotton. You are misrepresenting MF towels, and a F.A.Q. is the worst place for misinformation. I say there is absolutely no need "just be on the safe side" and steer clear of all MF towels.

Sorry, I didn't mean to mis-represent ALL MF towels, and I defenitely wasn't steering people away from MF. That is not quite accurate, considering I explained my preferences... but I did update the info to be less biased, although I still prefer 100% pure Terry MF towels.
J
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

Here's a very helpful beginner's guide to using the Porter Cable random orbital buffer. Explains all about the different pads, and has good advice for what product/pad combinaions work well for differing needs.
Link
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

Excuse me, but who told you there are "oils" in today's modern high solid clear coats?
These new generation (starting in the late 80's) are low solvent/high solid urethanes, and there are no "oils" left in the clear following the OEM paint assembly plants bake process. It removes the main solvent carrier, which is an emulsion of water and a hydrocarbon in the process.
The closest thing that you can lay your hands on to a modern clear is plastic, it is a chemical cousin of today's clears, just less porus.
Many of the products you apply to the clear when waxing or polishing due contain petroluem distillates and some polydimethalsiloxanes or polyaminosiloxanes, but these are not true "oils".
Just attempting to clear up some "old wives tales" that are continually perpertrated by old school product sales/marketing types.
Ketch
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (ketch)

I am on your bus! Poly synthetic and urethane blends are what most car makers use as flux in there paint which is usually not there paint but PPGs or any of the other makers they sub out for their production needs.
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (ChrisG)

How about "ALL" vehicle manufacturers, all 15 majors use.
They don't use old akiloid enamels or lacquers, they use high solid materials.
Even the "refinish" materials used by any accredited body shop is high solid/low solvent material, it's the "law" of the land.

A big difference in the chemistry of OEM assembly plant materials vs "body shop", but in reality, it is only in the curing of the materials that is different due to the chemistry, both are high solid/low solvent materials.
Ketch
Ketch
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (ketch)

Quote, originally posted by ketch »
Excuse me, but who told you there are "oils" in today's modern high solid clear coats?
These new generation (starting in the late 80's) are low solvent/high solid urethanes, and there are no "oils" left in the clear following the OEM paint assembly plants bake process. It removes the main solvent carrier, which is an emulsion of water and a hydrocarbon in the process.
The closest thing that you can lay your hands on to a modern clear is plastic, it is a chemical cousin of today's clears, just less porus.
Many of the products you apply to the clear when waxing or polishing due contain petroluem distillates and some polydimethalsiloxanes or polyaminosiloxanes, but these are not true "oils".
Just attempting to clear up some "old wives tales" that are continually perpertrated by old school product sales/marketing types.
Ketch

That's OK Ketch, we know you try. Just to clarify, there aren't any OILS in Urethane or other 'plastics' paint - I used that as an acronym so people could have a visual understanding of what it was doing for their paint. However, the paints themselves ARE pourous (if not on an almost microscopic level) and can be broken down and made more brittle by effects on the evironment - air, acidic chemicals in rainfall water, UV damage, and other pollutants due break down those 'plastics' that are used (IE have you ever found an old plastic toy under you porch or around that's been sitting out? THe plastic is brittle and it's dis-colored). Todays glazes, while not containing the same 'oils' that were used in the old Hot Rod Style enamel paints, due contain restorative nutrients and revitalizers that elongate the life of any type of paint, and help protect against further damage. They go beyond just a polish and/or removing of oxidation. If that were not the case, then why would over 85% of winning show car people use them along WITH polishers, cleaners and wax. I know you are in the "car repair equipment" business Ketch, and hear a lot of things, but could you please do a little more research before you post mis-information? IM me if you have questions, thanks.
J

Modified by SN2BDNGRZB55 at 7:02 PM 11-9-2003


Modified by SN2BDNGRZB55 at 7:21 PM 11-9-2003
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

Well, I have to tell you that you try, but the "facts" just don't go with what you are saying.
Yes, enviormental contaminates do attack and will break the "resin" system of todays clears.
If you wish to see a highly magnified cross section of today's paint system, I put it up on our corp web site, look under Tech Tips at http://www.autoint.com , it is there, and was provided, as is the "how today's paint systems are applied" by one of the 4 major OEM paint supplier we work with on a daily basis.
If one wishes to "feed" a modern high solid clear, you would have to add the certain plastizers back into it that the use of high alkaline cleaners, certain enviormental contaminates, remove.
A plastizer is acid based, and just like with rubber, vinyl, and paint, provide the gloss and elastic values needed.
The "resin" system is the key to holding it all together, attack that and it all comes apart.
"Oils" do not have these needed values.
Are you aware that an unprotected high solid clear on average, will absorb over one pint of water into the paint surface of the average vehicle, that the only thing that stops it from reaching the metal or other substrate used is the "e-coat"?
I just returned from a two week trip to the west coast, the first week I spent a day each with 4 of the largest importers paint and trim engineers, the last week at SEMA in our exhibit. Our exhibit was not for enthusists, but was visited by global parts distributors, vehicle manufacturers from around the world.
While there, I was approached by two large world manufacturers of vehicles, regarding providing consultation to them, which leaves only 4 of the 15 in the world that we don't work with on a regular basis.
I am not sharing this with you to "brag", but to let you know where I am coming from.
How about you? Do you work with Toyota, VW, BMW, Ford, GM(all divisions), DCX(all but MB), Renault, Nissan, Hyundia?
Their engineering groups?
Not trying to be throwing down, but I do know about today's paints and the issues that affect them, and I work with the paint suppliers to these manufacturers as well.
It is how I have made my living, aiding in building our company, for over 20 years.
Ketch
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (ketch)

Quote, originally posted by ketch »
Well, I have to tell you that you try, but the "facts" just don't go with what you are saying.
Yes, enviormental contaminates do attack and will break the "resin" system of todays clears.
Ketch

Bla bla bla. I guess you didn't read my reply before you posted. Like I said, I used the word "oil" to give people a visual of what happens to the paint, and why you use a glaze - that meaning got lost in your attempt to show people how affluent you were in the technical jargon of today's point. Is it really 'oil' or is it some kind of chemical that restores the "plastizers" and "resins" in the paint? Who cares. The REAL point is that when you prep and polish your paint, you DO need to use a glaze to restore some of the elasticity and gloss that is lost by the damage that is in everyday contaminents/pollutants. Also, dish washing soap does go through the clear coat and damage the base/pigment coat on a three-stage finish, so again whether it's oil or it's not, the point is don't use dishwashing detergent, unless you dis-agree with that..

It's always fun when people over analyze info, but then totally lose the point. All of that mumbo-jumbo but never once did you say that what I advised was bad...
Sometimes it's better to not say anything at all....
Oh, FYI. Here's a FAQ from Meguiars.com... uh, the company the over 90% of show car winners use... http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
From Meguiars.com:
"Can a clear coat oxidize?
Most modern car finishes consist of a base coat that contains the colored pigment, topped with a protective clear coat that is designed to keep the pigmented paint from oxidizing. UV protection is added into the clear coat that helps prevent the sun's rays from fading the color coat.
Oxidation was an obvious problem ten years ago because you quickly saw the color on a single-stage finish fade. With today's modern clear coat finishes, oxidation is less obvious, yet it still occurs.
Here is how it happens, the sun dries out the top layer of clear paint, just like it does to a single-stage finish and when this happens, the paints natural oils are lost.
Exposure to inclement weather and frequent washing, (especially with a harsh detergent like dish washing soap), further dries your paint out by leaching the natural oils out of your paint.
As the natural oils are removed, water and other destructive elements begin to attack your finish. If these oils aren't replaced, your clear coat paint will oxidize and the surface will gradually become duller. Although modern paint technology is much more resistant to oxidation, nevertheless, it will oxidize when neglected and/or improperly maintained.

For more information call our Customer Care Center at 1-800-545-3321, and talk with a surface care specialist. Or, use the convenience of e-mail.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Can a clear coat fade?
No and yes.
The word Fade means to, lose color or brightness gradually.
Technically speaking, since the clear has no color… it cannot fade or lose it's brightness. At least if we use the above definition. It can become dull, but that's not the same as fading.
Can the color coat below the clear coat fade? In short… Yes. But, it depends on the environment. A car parked inside most of it's life, far away from the equator will not show much sign of fading. Conversely, a car continually parked outside in a desert region close to the equator will fade more quickly and the results will be more apparent over time.
These are the technically correct answers. The non-technical answer to the question, "Can a clear coat fade?" is yes, but very slowly. So slowly that most people cannot perceive any change through the course of day to day living.

For more information call our Customer Care Center at 1-800-545-3321, and talk with a surface care specialist. Or, use the convenience of e-mail.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Can a clear coat get dull?
Most modern car finishes consist of a base coating that contains the color, topped with a protective clear coat that is designed to keep the pigmented paint from oxidizing. This outer clear coat adds UV protection that helps prevent the sun's rays from drying out the base paint. Oxidation was an obvious problem ten years ago because you quickly saw the color fade. Now that the outer layer is usually clear, oxidation is less obvious, yet it still occurs. The sun dries out top paint layers and natural oils are lost. If these oils aren't replaced, the paint oxidizes and the surface gradually becomes duller and duller.
Even more than yesterday's paints, today's clear coat finishes look faded whenever the surface becomes contaminated by airborne pollution, acid rain, industrial fallout, and countless other factors. If the contamination isn't removed frequently, it reduces the reflective quality of the finish until it looks dull and lifeless. If the contamination is left on the car for some time, it can begin to etch into the thin clear coat paint layer and expose the base coat to direct UV rays and even greater damage.
Once the clear coat protection is gone the car usually requires costly repainting.
For more information call our Customer Care Center at 1-800-545-3321, and talk with a surface care specialist. Or, use the convenience of e-mail.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------"

and so on. I guess if I can't help you, maybe you should email Barry Meguiar?
J



Modified by SN2BDNGRZB55 at 8:37 PM 11-9-2003
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

k i read through some of the stuff people have submitted. some very good stuff. i detail showroom cars, ie. make them ready to go into the showrooms. can take up to 6-8 hours depending on the car and color. black ones are the hardest and take around 7 usually.
for everything i do i have a detail bay. sounds fancy not too hard to do youself. get some fluorescnet lights, a space heater or 2, dust free area, where you can hose off things. not too hard.
most people have the washing techniques down good.
for drying:
wash the car outside roll it in.i have already cranked the heaters on full blast so the room is freakin hot. i am sweating just standing there. i go over the windows with a squegee and the entire car with another one cleaning after each sweep. just gets the majoirty of the water off there :edit: any fine scratches you do put into the car you end up taking out when you do the color cut anywayz:edit:. i go grab a coffee let the heater do the rest
next i claybar the car
claybar:
make sure you use a good bar. we use a bar from our supplier so i dont know what kind it is exactly buts its around $80 for the bars and we have different strengths for different colours and cars.
try to use lots of lubricant, soap and water is really good, just somthing so the bar doesn't stick. make small circles and go panel by panel. try to wash the car after each panel so lots of grit doesn't get in there
do the whole car, sedans usually take around an hour and a bit to do.
wash the car to get the soap and clay off, make sure you get it all off.
bring car back in and dry it off by hand. let the heater do the work again.
i usually let the car sit for about 15 minutes once dry in the hot bay so that the paint begins to become warm. makes for easy waxing.
waxing:
usually do 4 waxes in total, color cut, lustre, shine, and then a shine enhancer
when i use the color cut i usually do 2 coats and buff off with a wool pad on the buffer at around 1800rpm. if there are still some scratches i will do as many as neccessary.
lustre i will do about 2 or 3 coats again depending on the coat quality. light colors get done with a buffer dark ones especially black get done by hand.
shine: do a coat by hand and take off by hand
shine enhancer: again 2 coats take off by hand.
stand back and admire, fix any imperfections that are then seen.
key is to be in a warm bay. wax dries quicker, goes on better comes off better. it is usually better to let the wax sit for a few minutes until it is fully dry. it comes off easier but works better and doesn't haze the paint.
then i just roll it into the showroom and use a showroom cloth to remove any fingerprints and dust.....and wait for the little f u c k e r s to put their hands all over it.


hope that helped some people.


Modified by nOOb at 1:35 PM 12-5-2003
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

I would also like to add the "double wash" method.
My friend was a detailing freak (washed his car almost every day, waxed twice a week). and what he would do wash a section (like the roof), rinse, then wash again, and rinse again.
I started using this method and was amazed at how much cleaner my car came out. It really didn't add a whole lot of time to the process of washing the car, but made a HUGE difference on how clean the car ended up.
Try it out, you will be surprised
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (mike75bug)

Something came to mind now that is winter....
I usually put more wax on my car in October/November. I don't usually wax and fully detail my car until March, so for a longer period I use 2 to 3 coats of a thicker paste wax (I usually use a liquid wax during spring/summer). With the additonal precipitation - especially in the PNW where I live - you need additional protection for the extra junk and oil coming up off the road and through the rain/snow. I also wash my car more often - I go through a 'touchless' car wash if it's been a heavy week, even if it's raining that day. I don't like carwashes, but the touchless ones are better than the 'soft rag' or bristle washes. I also ONLY do that if it is a particularily heavy precipitation week (sometimes it rains 10-14 days straight around here). Don't buy any of that extra protection junk, just the basic $3-6 wash. It's good to keep the extra dirt off the car if weather doesn't permit spending 30mins outside washing your car, or it it's just really really dirty. http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

I don't know why I didn't post this before, but here is a REALLY REALLY useful link to Meguiars CarCareRX tool - it asks you a series of questions and makes recommendations for taking care of your paint:
http://www.meguiars.com/carrx.cfm
Of course, it recommends Meguiars products, but if you have a different brand preference you can see the type of products used and how they are applied, and cross reference that to your favorite line of products. Happy Detailing!!
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (zapper65)

Quote, originally posted by zapper65 »
Simple, I have a 2001 black Jetta and all I use is the 3M perfect_it line of products

I've heard that 3M is good (that's what a lot of body shops use...although most companies put out the same product at different levels...). Is that a professional/commercial grade product that is usually only available to shops, or is it an available consumer level product. There is a difference, and some products should only be used with certain types of equipment like a rotary buffer, while some are good to go for just a standard dual-action or random orbit buffer that is widely used by at-home detailers.. thanks! http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

Ok folks, I've been reading with interest the many comments about MF in this forum and I figured I'd better register and help clear up some of the gross misconceptions that are forming. The information being presented here is mostly incorrect.
First of all let me state that I am a textile designer and weaver and have been in the textile business for over 25 yrs. Much of what you read on the internet is hogwash, it is advertising hype and you must learn to read between the lines.
Microfiber is NOT any particular material, it is not strictly polyester, or nylon, or cotton, or cellulose, or whatever. MF is a term used to describe the thickness of a filamant of yarn. The technical term for this is "denier." A yarn of 1 denier is 9000 yards long and weighs 1 gram, microfiber is any yarn below a denier of .2 Therefore MF can be made from man made fibers such as polyester or rayon or it can be natural such as cotton or other cellulose. Microfiber is not any particular weave, when you say 100% Terry MF it makes no sense.
MF filaments are spun together, usually with other materials, to form a single strand of yarn which is then combined with other yarn to make a thread which is used in the weaving of the cloth. Forget about 90,000 or 100,000 thread count, there is no such animal. Forget about thread count completely. Thread count has nothing to do with quality or softness. A good analogy would be that burap can have a higher thread count than a cotton shheet, would you use burlap on your car?
Without going intoi too much further detail suffice it to say that a natural materail is less prone to scratching than a man made. That is not to say that natural won't scratch! What you need to watch out for is the quality of the material and how it is made. It is a difficult thing to determine so the best thing to do is check web sites such as http://www.autopia.org, http://www.showcargarage.com, and http://www.detailcity.com and see what people there like to use. Make an informed decision as to what you think you may want and thenn buy a towel or two from the better manufacturers (stay away from Wal Mart and Costco as they have very inconsistent quality.) Once you get to try the towels you can then decide what is best for you, everyone has their own preferences.
Leo
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (DFTowel)

Sorry but I need to elaborate on something. I keep seeing you mention that 100% Terry MF is something new. This is totally false! Terry towels made from MF yarns of various types have been around for 20 yrs! You also say that certain thread counts make a towel terry or poly. This makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. Terry is a type of weave (the familiar loops you see on towels) it has absolutely nothing to do with content (poly, cotton, whatever) or thread size (MF or not.)
You need to understand that a terry towel can be all cotton non MF, cotton MF, Poly MF, Poly MF with nylon, cellulose MF with cotton, silk!, rayone, linen, etc. etc. etc.
Something else you need to look for in a towel and that is the stitching. Many lower quality MF towels sometimes are sewn with polyester thread which in itself can scratch your paint so be carfull. Also be sure to remove any labels that may be attached.
You also need to be wary of mislabeled products. Many towels labeled All Cotton for example coming from India, Pakistan, and the Orient may not be 100% cotton, don't always believe the labels.
Leo
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (DFTowel)

Quote, originally posted by DFTowel »
Sorry but I need to elaborate on something. I keep seeing you mention that 100% Terry MF is something new. This is totally false! Terry towels made from MF yarns of various types have been around for 20 yrs! You also say that certain thread counts make a towel terry or poly. This makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. Terry is a type of weave (the familiar loops you see on towels) it has absolutely nothing to do with content (poly, cotton, whatever) or thread size (MF or not.)
You need to understand that a terry towel can be all cotton non MF, cotton MF, Poly MF, Poly MF with nylon, cellulose MF with cotton, silk!, rayone, linen, etc. etc. etc.
Something else you need to look for in a towel and that is the stitching. Many lower quality MF towels sometimes are sewn with polyester thread which in itself can scratch your paint so be carfull. Also be sure to remove any labels that may be attached.
You also need to be wary of mislabeled products. Many towels labeled All Cotton for example coming from India, Pakistan, and the Orient may not be 100% cotton, don't always believe the labels.
Leo

Leo,
Thank you for the detailed information about what to look for in a good detailing towel, and especially for clearing up a lot of mis-conceptions about what kind of fibers make what, and what Terry really means. I think most of us are so familiar with the terms "Terry" and "Cotton" in the same sentence that it is generally assumed that a "terry" cloth has to be cotton - I know I did. Also, I did mention in my experience that the towels I have seen advertised (advertised being the key word, as you mentioned) with higher thread counts usually stated a higher polymer/polyester percentage, but that wasn't meant as a rule, just what I had seen in my shopping around various sites and local car shops. Also, I did assume that Terry MF was new, only because MF was new to me in the consumer market in general and I hadn't seen Terry MF towels in the past. I apologize if I miss-informed anybody.
However, I do have a question. Obviously you want to get a towel that is soft and won't have any potential for damaging your paint. So, are cotton towels generally less susceptible to scratching? What is the softest fabric? Also, what does thread count tell you about anything, or does it? Will thread count tell you how absorbent a towel is? What is typically the highest thread count you can get? The MF towels I found are Terry, they are Cotton, and they are MF (although it doesn't state thread count, and they are made in the U.S. so hopefully they are pure cotton). I did get them at Costco, however being skeptical of prior MF experiences, I tested them on an inconspicuous spot on my car before using them all the time. The ends of the towels have been sewn almost like a piping that is very very small - the tufts from the towel actually almost entirely encapsulate them. I tried using the towels on a CD like suggested by Triumph, pressing very hard, and the towels made absolutely not even a hint of a mark.. and they have been great on my car. I guess that makes them a good towel. But, I am curious if there are types of materials that you should AVOID when looking at good detailing towels. Can you elaborate a little?
Thanks so much for your input Leo! It was great for you to jump in an help us enthusiasts make sure our cars had the best of the best!
Jesse


Modified by SN2BDNGRZB55 at 9:46 PM 1-23-2004
 

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Re: Detailing Forum "How-To" (SN2BDNGRZB55)

So, are cotton towels generally less susceptible to scratching?
Yes but that is not to say cotton can't scratch. Nor is it saying polyester will scratch. Abrasiveness is more related to the treatment and production of the yarn rather than what it is.
What is the softest fabric?
That's like saying who is the prettiest girl or what is the best color car! A fabric that feels soft can be more abrasive than one that feels stiffer. Generally, however, softer fabrics are made of natural materials rather than man mades such as polyester. Sometimes softness is due to finishes such as silicone added to the fabric thus folling you into thinking they are soft, much like fabric softners.
Also, what does thread count tell you about anything, or does it?
It means nothing to the end user, thread count is simply the number of threads in a square inch (or centimeter.) Many distributors quote outlandish thread counts like 90,000 or more. 90,000 what? Are they quoting threads or the filaments that make up the threads. Are they quoting both sides or one side of the fabric? Thread count is typically the threads which usually can be counted at about 500 or so, anything much denser you will have a satin fabric which certainly will be too smooth and non absorbent. Forget thread count
Will thread count tell you how absorbent a towel is?
Not exactly, absorbency is more related to the content (cotton, linen, polyester, whatever) However, for a fabric made up of a particular fiber such as cotton for example, a denser weave (higher thread count) mauy be more absorbant than a less dense one. Again, don't worry about thread count.
What is typically the highest thread count you can get?
Depends on the yarn size and the content... FORGET ABOUT THREAD COUNT!!
The MF towels I found are Terry, they are Cotton, and they are MF (although it doesn't state thread count, and they are made in the U.S. so hopefully they are pure cotton).
You are again using the term MF as if it is a particular content, saying something is MF or cotton is wrong... MF refers to a very fine yarn which can be cottnn, cellulose, polyester, rayon, or other fibers.
I did get them at Costco, however being skeptical of prior MF experiences, I tested them on an inconspicuous spot on my car before using them all the time. The ends of the towels have been sewn almost like a piping that is very very small - the tufts from the towel actually almost entirely encapsulate them. I tried using the towels on a CD like suggested by Triumph, pressing very hard, and the towels made absolutely not even a hint of a mark.. and they have been great on my car. I guess that makes them a good towel. But, I am curious if there are types of materials that you should AVOID when looking at good detailing towels. Can you elaborate a little?
Avoid steel wool!
Hard question to answer but my personal opinion is to stay away from man made fibers because they can be inconsistent BUT many people swear by them and never have a problem. To each his own!
The CD test is not gospel! It is only a guide, if the towel scratches the CD it still may not harm your car as the CD is much softer than your car's finish.
 
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