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'17 GSW 4MO DSG lifted w/ AT springs
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried this out today; it worked great so thought I'd share.
This will lift the car 9.25" (23.5 cm), more if you add additional planks or scrap wood.

It cost me about $35, but that's because I already had some planks for the front ramp and some cement blocks for the same section. If buying everything outright it would be more like $50.

Here it is



Tire Wood Wheel Floor Flooring

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Land vehicle

Car Vehicle Automotive tail & brake light Tire Vehicle registration plate


It might look sketchy, but it's easy to position everything and the car is very stable once in place. Just measure the wheel path between the planks to get everything parallel. It seemed to be the perfect distance/height to work below with a creeper. I put a beefy new Whiteline rear swaybar in this morning.

Nothing is bolted or screwed together, which makes it easy to stow away afterwards. I used 2X8 lumber throughout. Two 10-footers for the flat part, another 2X8X10 cut in half make up the ramps. Its an easy grade to climb. You'll want to place a block of scrap or a piece of firewood under each ramp at mid-span (not all the pics show this).

The ramps can be removed once the car is in place.
 

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I tried this out today; it worked great so thought I'd share.
This will lift the car 9.25" (23.5 cm), more if you add additional planks or scrap wood.

It cost me about $35, but that's because I already had some planks for the front ramp and some cement blocks for the same section. If buying everything outright it would be more like $50.

Here it is



View attachment 239764
View attachment 239767
View attachment 239768

It might look sketchy, but it's easy to position everything and the car is very stable once in place. Just measure the wheel path between the planks to get everything parallel. It seemed to be the perfect distance/height to work below with a creeper. I put a beefy new Whiteline rear swaybar in this morning.

Nothing is bolted or screwed together, which makes it easy to stow away afterwards. I used 2X8 lumber throughout. Two 10-footers for the flat part, another 2X8X10 cut in half make up the ramps. Its an easy grade to climb. You'll want to place a block of scrap or a piece of firewood under each ramp at mid-span (not all the pics show this).

The ramps can be removed once the car is in place.
Run:

Yeah it DOES look "sketchy" mainly because wood splinters and cracks and concrete crumbles! Where's the jackstands?!!!!!! I've got 7 ton Blackhawk low-profile for my lowered MKIII and I only jack it up "this much" when necessary. I have Rhino Ramps if I need to go higher.

 

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'17 GSW 4MO DSG lifted w/ AT springs
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wouldn't go under there, mainly because you don't know the comppressive strength of the concrete blocks.
The compressive strength is 1800psi
They build foundations, chimneys and support columns for buildings with these. Imagine the weight of a 30-40ft tall chimney on the bottom blocks.

I guess one could double-up on the blocks and planks for good measure.
 

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'17 GSW 4MO DSG lifted w/ AT springs
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208 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Black Friday sale at harbor freight, get you some 3 Ton jack stands for less than the 5 cement blocks. Only $31
The blocks cost me $13.20, nowhere near the price of the stands, and no need for a jack, which is nice.
In this case I was installing a rear swaybar and needed the suspension loaded rather than hanging.
 

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2016 Golf R, 2001 Cabrio VR6
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I have little doubt that, if the planks and blocks are in good condition and regularly inspected, this is structurally adequate.

That does not mean I would trust my life to it, or moreover, my car.
 

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Sorry to rain on your parade but I have to agree with others, thats sketchy I would not get underneath that. Jack stands(at proper lift points) with floor jack is the most economical way to get under a car(safely).
Harbor Freight might not be best for everything but their daytona floor jack and new jack stands are the best bang for your money.
 

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The ramp could slip with wheel spin. Wood could crack due to block spacing. Too narrow so edge of tire can flip / roll wood. Too easy to drive over the edge. Time to setup unless permanent. Can't jack up the car. Definitely no engineering in terms of designed and safety. If this was in a work invironment this would be an OSHA nightmare.

When cost is the focus on a supposed unique creation. Sometimes in the name of saving a few bucks our creations always look good, right and safe in our own minds. Pennywise and thousands of pounds...
 

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Sat like this for 6 months during pandemic while I was fully rebuilding tranny and resealing engine. Don’t worry got VW and Audi in the stable as well. Max lift 32 inches, spent countless hours underneath. Scored 4 30 inch trailer stabilizer scissor jacks on Amazon for $90 in 2020, each was 5 ton rated then bolted 2x8 to the bottom and top. Sold for $150 to Miata guys when I was done with the beemer and needed to move to a new house
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