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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Background​
I, like many others, drive a MK5 Jetta with the 2.5L engine. It is well observed that the vacuum pump (for cars with the 09G Tiptronic transmission) is an incredibly common cause of an oil leak. I happen to be one of those drivers. Unfortunately, mine was becoming worse, as I noticed more and more oil and dirt collecting on my splash guard every few weeks when I removed it to check for said oil. I looked everywhere for a "how to" guide, only to come up empty. Every time I looked through another post about this subject, I kept finding little tips or the thread would turn into bickering about different methods of replacement. I decided it was about time someone made a detailed guide on how to do it.

I decided to do it myself. This is my first time doing this repair. Owning this car has been an incredible learning experience for me (as well as working in a shop for a while now) but regardless, I hope with this guide I can pass along what I've learned to others.

This guide will show you how to replace your leaky vacuum pump using only common hand tools. All of these tools can be found from local hardware stores to your Snap-On representative. You will not need to pull your transmission or loosen the transmission bolts to the engine block! So, sit back, relax, and enjoy reading this lengthy post knowing that you won't have to spend more than $25 (plus some shipping) on fixing that oil leak.

The Tools and Supplies​

For parts, you will need the following

For tools, here is what I used


  • (Unpictured) A LED lamp with headstrap
  • 2 different length magnetic ratcheting drivers
  • T20, T25, and T30 Torx bits for ratcheting drivers
  • 10mm wrench
  • a set of adjustable grip pliers (I have two pictured obviously, but it's only to remove the intake clamps)
  • 3/8" ratchet
  • 1/4" ratchet
  • 3/8" 6" socket extension
  • 3/8" 3" extension
  • 3/8" - 10mm, 13mm, and 14mm sockets
  • 1/4" - 6" flex extension
  • 1/4" - 3" extension
  • 1/4" - swivel joint extension
  • 1/4" - 10mm, 12mm, and 1/4" sockets
  • a few pairs (okay... maybe a box) of latex gloves
  • paper towel/rags
  • a can of degreaser
  • a can of brake cleaner or similar compressed cleaner
  • GoJo or similar pumice soap for afterwards
  • something to chalk your wheels to prevent them from rolling (you'll learn why below)
  • lots of patience
  • a few hours of free time

Now let's get to work!

The Process​

Here is what I am using to show you. This is the engine bay of my MK5 2005.5 Jetta 2.5L daily driver and project.



Let's get started! PUT YOUR WHEEL CHALKS IN PLACE NOW BEFORE YOU FORGET!:banghead: also, pulling your E-Brake and leaving it on will be beneficial as well.

Start by removing the engine cover and intake tubes. For removing the MAF sensor clip, push down onto the top of it, and hold it down while simultaneously pulling the clip, then simply pull the MAF plug out of the housing.



Use your T20 and a corresponding ratcheting driver to remove the Torx bits from the intake tubes and ducts, and unclamp the intake hose from the throttle body to the MAF. Then, remove the engine cover entirely by pulling up to free it from the 4 grommets that hold it into place. Once the cover is out, remove the battery.



Use your 1/4" ratchet and one of your extensions with a 10mm bit to loosen the terminals. Begin with the positive, then the negative. Tuck them away by twisting the negative cable so it is hidden behind the fuse box and find a place by the left headlight to tuck the positive cable. Then move onto the retainer at the base of the battery.



For this I used my 3/8" ratchet, a 6" extension, and a 13mm socket.

Now, remove the 3 bolts that retain the battery tray, circled below (potato quality)



For this, switch out the 13mm socket with a 10mm socket on your 3/8" ratchet and extension.

From there, unclamp your breather hoses from your intake hose. And then, unclamp your intake hose from your throttle body. Once that is out of the way, you'll have this wonderful space to work with.



The arrow is pointing to where the pump is located, and the 3 circles are what is on the transmission that we still need to move before we start at the pump.

Unclip the plug going into the gear selector from the TCM for starters. Much like the MAF plug, it will help by pushing the plug inwards first before simultaneously pulling the clip and plug out.



Then remove the cable from its plastic retainer. There are no clips holding it in, it's basically a plastic fold that holds the TCM cable into place.



Now to remove the shift linkage. This is very simple. To do this, insert your 10mm wrench under the rubber grommet at the end of the selector cable and pry upwards. Nothing will break, it is much like the engine cover grommets. Once the cable is pried off of the transmission selector, unclip the cable retainer from the transmission.



To do this, push the two tabs inward like seen in the picture above, then pull the cable upwards. It may feel like it is stuck in there pretty good, but wiggle it a little bit and it will come up.

Then, once the selector cable and TCM cable are out of the way, use your 12mm socket and remove the actual lever. You only need to remove the top nut, do not mess with the bottom one. Finally, to give your hand some extra room, unclip the cable from its retainer (picture with arrow below) and tuck away.



When that is out of the way, we have this...



As you can see, we now have a much more clear view of the pump and the oil leak it has caused by just looking at all of the oil and dirt stuck in there.

Onto the actual removal!



First, unplug the brake booster line that comes out of the side of the vacuum pump. No fluid will come out. You simply twist 90 degrees and pull it. (If the little rubber grommet doesn't come off with it, don't worry about it, we'll mess with that later.



Tuck the brake booster line behind the transmission for now to keep it out of the way.

Now onto the part that requires incredible patience and tolerance. We'll start by getting the bottom bolt out of the way, so grab your T30 Torx bit and 1/4" socket for your 1/4" drive ratchet and combine them. DO NOT USE THE ONE PIECE VERSION (unless it is similar to the one on the left)



The reason you don't use the type on the right is because it doesn't allow for wiggle room. Even though there is incredibly low room to move, the two piece one on the left allows you slightly more room to work with when your hand is underneath the vacuum pump.



(I actually tried gluing it to the socket lol, didn't hold though :laugh:)

Before you try to fit the bit into place, have your 1/4" ratchet with 3" extension and swivel joint ready to go. This is so when you do find that sweet spot and get it to fit, you don't have to spend much time fumbling around trying to attach multiple things with one hand.

Feel around with your fingers on your right hand so you can find the bottom bolt for the pump. Once you find it, use your left hand and maneuver it under the pump to put the bit with socket in place. This does become painstaking (I almost gave up here) especially if it is dirty from the oil and dirt. But, you'll eventually get it to fit.



Once it does fit, hold it in place! While holding it with your left hand, use your right hand to push the male end of the ratchet with the swivel joint into place. When you finally get the socket and joint clicked together, push on it so you don't lose the fit of the torx bit and bolt. Then, while still applying pressure to the socket to keep it in place, break loose the bolt. Finally, you can loosen it until you feel like there are no more threads being unscrewed, and reach your hand in to grab the bottom bolt.

Now that the bottom bolt is free, switch to your ratcheting driver again and this time use a T25 Torx bit to remove the 4 screws holding the cover plate onto the vacuum pump. Some oil may come out, but again, don't worry. Once off, simply pull out the plastic "turbine" piece as well as the cylinder itself until it won't come out any farther.

Go back to your ratchet and remove the final two T30 bolts holding in the pump, as seen below.




Once those are free, you may or may not have noticed there is a small bracket that also holds the pump in that happens to be connected to the solid black tube.



The arrow shows the relative location. Simply loosen the nut (not all of the way, I believe it is just a 10mm nut though) until you can move it out of the way. (For reference, it only overlays the left and bottom pump holes before you bolt them on again. I'll rephrase this later.)



Another picture for reference. This is with the pump removed and the bracket is hanging loose. As you can see, the bottom hole of the bracket lines up with the bottom hole for the pump.

Now is the fun part! Time to wiggle out that dang pump. This is for you to figure out in terms of exact location, because the tolerances may very well be different than my crusty old engine. Use the picture below for reference.



By using the gear selector stud and the notch as a pivot point in a sense, you will be able to work the pump out of its location. Take your time though and don't get too frustrated!



Here is what you are left with when you remove the pump! As you can see, the bracket is much more apparent here. Spray some degreaser on some paper towel or rags and wipe the contact surface clean, then go over it with brake cleaner on a rag or paper towel to ensure no residue is left behind.

Time to see what the issue was...



It's very apparent from looking at the gasket that the source of the leak was between the engine block and gasket, not the backplate of the pump. Regardless, it's time to break out that tube of Reinsoil sealant!



Old and new (used) pump for reference

Time to reassemble!



Put a small even bead around the raised lip of the gasket. This will be the side that is pressed against the engine block. A clean surface, as well as clean gasket with sealant, should prevent any leaks for a LONG time.



Do the same for the contact surface of the replacement pump.

Now, together, it's time to work them back into place. Take the gasket and pump together and like how you removed it, you now need to re-insert the pump using the gear selector stud as the pivot. Here's the picture again for reference. Re-insert the pump more from the side again.

Fun Fact: Because you have to rotate the pump slightly clockwise to get it back into place, it also is the same direction the gear selector turns at. The notch got caught while I was doing it and switched my car into reverse and it started rolling out of my garage. :laugh: I had to yell for my mom to pull the E-Brake. THIS IS WHY I SAID CHALK YOUR TIRES AND PULL THE E-BRAKE BEFORE HAND!



(NOTE: The pump cylinder does not have to be pushed into place yet to bolt the pump back into place)

Once you have it in place, Grab that flexible extension and the T30 torx and socket combo bit I had you devise and put the right pump bolt into place without tightening down entirely. Just thread it in there a few turns. Once in place, double check the retainer I mentioned earlier, and make sure it is not in between the new gasket and vacuum pump. The order should be as follows before you bolt the final two bolts into place, engine block -> gasket -> vacuum pump -> retainer IN THAT ORDER. If you do not do that properly, expect oil EVERYWHERE when you start your engine again.

Now get that 1/4" ratchet and 3" extension and swivel back to where it's in close reach.



Once the order is correct, put the left pump bolt roughly into place. Then, using your left hand again, guide the new bolt and T30/flexible extension combo into the bottom hole. Once threaded, hold the setup into place and attach the ratchet to the end of the flexible extension and tighten down as much as you can. From there, work out the flexible attachment with your right hand (while still holding the bit and socket into place with your left) and attach the swivel and 3" set up we used earlier and tighten the bolt until you feel it's as tight as can be without stripping it. Then do the same for the other two that were just loosely threaded into place earlier.

Grab that piece of plastic you pulled out of the pump earlier and give it a good cleaning to make sure there's no dirt. Take the plastic turbine and pull out the cylinder so you can rotate it (for me I was able to re-insert the plastic at about 90 degrees to work around the selector stud) and re-insert the plastic.

Slowly rotate while pushing in the cylinder until it locks into place. It does this because it has to lock into a sprocket for the upper chain.



(For reference)

Now, take the rubber seal and make sure that isn't dirty either and give it a nice uniform coat of sealant ON ONE SIDE. Then put the side with sealant facing into the pump.



Same with the cover plate. Make sure it is clean, and follow the imprint left from the seal before it was taken apart and follow it with a small bead of sealant.



Screw back on the cover plate with the 4 - T25 screws, going until you feel like the screw won't go any farther unless you strip it.

Then, attach the brake booster line, ensuring the rubber grommet is in place and is fitting snug.

Time to re-assemble! By now, you should know how the rest of your car goes back together, but if you're stuck, just follow the guide in reverse for the exact order of re-installation.

Once you're finished, I'd recommend a fresh oil change as well to ensure any dirt doesn't get ground into the internals of your engine (since there was an opening to the timing chain)

Here is my lower end after changing my oil today after work (since I could take a good look from under a lift)




No fresh oil in sight! This is the cleanest my engine has probably been in a LONG time, and hopefully this helps keep it that way for a while.

Total time: Less than 4 hours

A special thanks to VW NUTTS for giving me direction on the process. Without his detailed description, I wouldn't have been able to piece together everything.

Discuss and comment below! :):beer:
 

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Thank-you sir. Now I've got no excuse.:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! Just tried to fill a void in terms of solutions to a common problem.

I want to keep this thread active, so if anyone has questions, please feel free to ask!

Also a little update: Been driving with this fix for over 100 miles now (a lot of hard driving too to relieve some stress and my new poly dogbone insert is nice) I reached into the bay and ran my finger around the cover plate seal and felt a little oil on the bottom left of the plate. Took a T25 screwdriver and made sure the screw wasn't loose. Managed to tighten it just a touch more. Took it for a 20ish mile drive and double checked and no fresh oil! The gasket between the block and pump is clean as a whistle as well! :cool:
 

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Is the consensus that you don't have to buy a replacement vacuum pump? Just replace the gasket and add new sealer?

All the Ebay parts I see is basically the same used vacuum pump that I have and by the looks of all the crusty oil on the used ones, they all have exhibited leaking at some point in time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rob: To be honest, you could easily go that route and be just fine. I'm actually going to sell my old one once I clean it. The leaks are just from either the gasket or cover plate, which both don't come from the factory with any silicone. Get a tube of that Victor Reinz like I did and you're golden. This DIY isn't just for replacing the pump with a new one, it's more to show how to remove the one on our cars without any fancy tricks.

I didn't think about sealing it until after I bought everything... then kinda had a *facepalm* moment. If you want, just make sure you have a new gasket and use the same pump!

Rev: Manual transmission cars have a smaller pump, much less of a hassle to remove :)
 

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Great write up and thanks! I'm currently sitting at a VW dealer with the wife's car... Tried to take advantage of an oil change special and get her Jetta inspected. And 2hrs later still waiting. They won't pass the inspection due to a 'massive oil leak' from the vacuum pump. I've known about the leak since December, but having only lost 1qt of oil in the last 5 months have been putting off repairing it. I don't think 1qt in 5 months is 'massive.' My '94 Land Cruiser leaks more than that. They want $1300 to repair it, and I feel the source of my wait is my explanation that I would be doing any repair work myself. So a few questions about this job:

Before starting this repair is it necessary to drain the engine oil? Or does oil not freely flow through the pump unless the engine is on?

If I were to buy a whole new pump would the process be just a removal of the old, and install of the new? Paying attention of course to properly seal it to the engine block. I'm assuming that would eliminate a few of the steps in your process. Also would a thorough cleaning and rebuilding be as good of an option as buying a used pump?

I've been lurking on these forums a lot recently as getting married has made me a proud owner of a MkV Jetta, and this thread convinced me to register, so thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great write up and thanks! I'm currently sitting at a VW dealer with the wife's car... Tried to take advantage of an oil change special and get her Jetta inspected. And 2hrs later still waiting. They won't pass the inspection due to a 'massive oil leak' from the vacuum pump. I've known about the leak since December, but having only lost 1qt of oil in the last 5 months have been putting off repairing it. I don't think 1qt in 5 months is 'massive.' My '94 Land Cruiser leaks more than that. They want $1300 to repair it, and I feel the source of my wait is my explanation that I would be doing any repair work myself. So a few questions about this job:
I'll be happy to answer!

Before starting this repair is it necessary to drain the engine oil? Or does oil not freely flow through the pump unless the engine is on?
No need to drain the oil! Though I happened to be due for an oil change when I did this, so I changed my oil AFTER I did the replacement and test drove for a little while to work any contamination into the pan. The pump opening goes into the timing cover and sprocket, so it's not an area filled will oil like the bottom end. There will be a little oil on the knuckle of the vacuum pump, but that's it!

If I were to buy a whole new pump would the process be just a removal of the old, and install of the new? Paying attention of course to properly seal it to the engine block. I'm assuming that would eliminate a few of the steps in your process. Also would a thorough cleaning and rebuilding be as good of an option as buying a used pump?
Yes. My guide is based on doing what you just said, buying a new/used pump and replacing the old one. In order to do it this way though, you have to dismantle both pumps regardless. But that's why I went into detail and added the silicone, because our pumps don't have silicone for the cover plate anyway. Since I had the plate off, I thought it would be a good opportunity to make sure another potential leak source was eliminated.

But! Cleaning and rebuilding your current pump is just as good! Just make sure you pick up the ECS Tuning install kit that I linked to in the main post. The pumps themselves aren't what go bad, it's the seals themselves. I just happened to buy another pump, I didn't think to just re-use my pump until after I did this lol

I've been lurking on these forums a lot recently as getting married has made me a proud owner of a MkV Jetta, and this thread convinced me to register, so thanks!
Congrats! It will give you many headaches, but when she's healthy they are the best cars to drive at times.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk
 

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Awesome, thanks for the quick reply! The Jetta just rolled over 100k miles and I plan to make this car last another 100k... unless of course we start popping out babies and need some more room. I'm still shocked at the $1300 repair price quoted from the dealership compared to what my final costs should be for doing it myself. I hope to get this done two weekends from now so will report back with my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Awesome, thanks for the quick reply! The Jetta just rolled over 100k miles and I plan to make this car last another 100k... unless of course we start popping out babies and need some more room. I'm still shocked at the $1300 repair price quoted from the dealership compared to what my final costs should be for doing it myself. I hope to get this done two weekends from now so will report back with my experience.
Looking forward to your response on your experience! Aside from this, these engines are very solid, so you shouldn't have a problem hitting 200k. I'm at 128k now and aside from the chain going (05.5 motor, tensioners revised in 08.) now that I have fresh timing, she purrs like a new car!
 

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So I haven't yet had the chance to do this job just yet, but in my research have come across the option to delete the vacuum pump completely, using this piece from USP http://www.uspmotorsports.com/Integrated-Engineering-Vacuum-Pump-Blockoff-Plate-MKV-VI-2.5.html, which greatly interests me. My unfamiliarity with this engine though has me wondering about how to reroute the vacuum line back to the manifold, as other posts on this delete mostly deal with custom manifolds and discuss that with the stock manifold the process in olives drilling to plum a new line. Any experience here with vacuum lines on the 2.5l that I could use to connect the vacuum line coming from the vacuum pump to? Trying to decide between ordering the gasket and hardware kit and using my existing vacuum pump, or ordering the USP kit to do the delete.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So I haven't yet had the chance to do this job just yet, but in my research have come across the option to delete the vacuum pump completely, using this piece from USP http://www.uspmotorsports.com/Integrated-Engineering-Vacuum-Pump-Blockoff-Plate-MKV-VI-2.5.html, which greatly interests me. My unfamiliarity with this engine though has me wondering about how to reroute the vacuum line back to the manifold, as other posts on this delete mostly deal with custom manifolds and discuss that with the stock manifold the process in olives drilling to plum a new line. Any experience here with vacuum lines on the 2.5l that I could use to connect the vacuum line coming from the vacuum pump to? Trying to decide between ordering the gasket and hardware kit and using my existing vacuum pump, or ordering the USP kit to do the delete.
Don't mess with the blockoff plate unless you have a hardcore build. To run the blockoff plate, you need a bunch of other things which you can find from Integrated Engineering (who make the plate to begin with.) You'd need their boost tap, blockoff plate, and a catchcan system (which I'd recommend Black Forest Industries for their setup) so you'd end up spending over $400. I had the same thoughts you did before I learned.

You see, deleting the pump and simply rerouting the line would allow for oil and water to get into the brake booster line. You would need a catchcan to eliminate that.

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
just an update! I've probably put 1200 miles on my car ever since this DIY and the vacuum pump is still oil free!

Just now my oil pan decided it was time to be re-sealed. Oh well, win some ya lose some. :laugh: feel free to message or comment if you have any questions!
 

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just an update! I've probably put 1200 miles on my car ever since this DIY and the vacuum pump is still oil free!

Just now my oil pan decided it was time to be re-sealed. Oh well, win some ya lose some. :laugh: feel free to message or comment if you have any questions!
Thank you for the write up
 

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Great DIY snake! I'm afraid I'm going to have to do this as I'm seeing tiny drops of oil on my pavement every now and then. Chances are its the vacuum pump and not the valve cover. I have a few questions....

While wrestling out the pump, Is the gear selector stud easily disturbed? in your case you accidentaly put it in reverse.

I can't tell which has more space in the photos..but which direction did you pull the pump out? left side out or right?

When putting it back on...did you press the gasket on the engine block first or was it applied on the pump already? Either way I'd imagine it will get messy and the sealant will get all over the place..unless its much easier when putting the pump back on. Was the installation easier than the removal?

Did you need to lift the car? or rather would it help? Maybe working it from the bottom or something.

Did you torque it back to spec or just tighten it as much as you can? Do you happen to know the torque spec on the bolts? I'd imagine its a good idea to do that since this part is prone to leaking.

Thanks for the great write-up!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Great DIY snake! I'm afraid I'm going to have to do this as I'm seeing tiny drops of oil on my pavement every now and then. Chances are its the vacuum pump and not the valve cover. I have a few questions....

Happy to help! Most likely is the pump as our valve covers aren't prone to leaking. Only our oil pans and vacuum pumps are.

While wrestling out the pump, Is the gear selector stud easily disturbed? in your case you accidentaly put it in reverse.

Not usually, I just happened to get the pump lodged on there in a weird spot while working it and just happened to be my luck lol. But as long as your E-brake is pulled and you chalk your wheels, your car wont move at all!

I can't tell which has more space in the photos..but which direction did you pull the pump out? left side out or right?

If standing on the left side of your car and facing the engine bay, the left side is easier to work it out.

When putting it back on...did you press the gasket on the engine block first or was it applied on the pump already? Either way I'd imagine it will get messy and the sealant will get all over the place..unless its much easier when putting the pump back on. Was the installation easier than the removal?

I pressed the gasket onto the block first but it just slowly slipped down. It's going to be messy, but work it in with the pump, then once you finally get it in place, put the top right pump bolt in as a placeholder while you work to set the other 2 in place. There will be enough silicone, that when tightened down, will spread. Kind of like how it spreads when you put cpu grease and then clamp down the heatsink.

Did you need to lift the car? or rather would it help? Maybe working it from the bottom or something.

Nope. All was done while the car was stationary on the ground! Can't work from under it because they tranny is in the way ;) haha

Did you torque it back to spec or just tighten it as much as you can? Do you happen to know the torque spec on the bolts? I'd imagine its a good idea to do that since this part is prone to leaking.

No torque specs that I could find, but you can feel the threads running out so to speak when tightening down. I tightened the best I could, then really went and double checked and you can feel the gasket and silicone ironing out when you are doing your final turns. The ECS bolts are solid, so they shouldnt strip on you. But you'll feel well beforehand if you're getting close. Same goes for the cover plate bolts. Those actually where leaking on me when I was finished, just needed to go an extra couple turns after they already felt solid, and you can feel that silicone spreading. Spotless ever since!

Thanks for the great write-up!

Thanks for your questions! Always happy to help :)
Also, it's now been 10k miles since I've done this. Still leak free :)
 

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Also, it's now been 10k miles since I've done this. Still leak free :)
I think I might just re-use the old pump but I can't find the gasket (the red one inside the pump) anywhere. I guess they don't sell it separately? Was the culprit mostly the flat gasket? If so I wonder if it would help (for now) just to tighten the bolts of the pump. Might just be a little loose or something.

What was the condition of the red gasket on your old pump..was it still reusable?
 
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