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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well as promised, I'm going to start a series of DIY's, so heres the first

Sorry for the fuzzy pics, they've been saturated because of me resizing/editing them. I will fix them, I just don't have time right now.

This was done on a 2005 Jetta BBW, but applies to AZG, AVH, or BEV engines as well
The AEG process is similar, but uses a different coil pack. I'm sure you can figure it out, once you look at it.

Symptoms of a bad coil pack
Well what was happening for me, was that my car was misfiring on cold starts. Chances are, if your car is only misfiring in wet or cold weather, the coil pack is bad.
Here is a picture of why mine was bad. There was cracks in the plastic, over the cylinder 3 coil.



There is a very simple way to test your coil pack.

Testing
Get a spray bottle, fill it with water.
Go outside, start your car.
Pop your hood, and spray your coil pack.
If it misfires, its bad.
If you do this process at night, you'll probably be able to see an electrical "arc"

Temporary Fix
So you can still drive your car while you're saving for a new one, or waiting for one in the mail, Coat the coil pack in WD40. I mean really drench the thing. If you can visually see any cracks, or you saw an arc and where its coming from - make sure you really spray that area. The WD40 reduces moisture and displaces water. Wait a couple hours to let it dry, then come out and start your car. It should be running normal

What tools you'll need
- 5mm + 6mm allen keys, hex bits, or pressed in hex bit sockets.
- Your average, any size wrench for a cheater bar (if you're using Allen keys)

I prefer to use my 12v bosch electric impact on small jobs like this. Its small, cordless, powerful, and fast.




Replacement
To start, its probably a good idea to disconnect the battery ground. Probably not nessecary, but I do it just about anytime I'm working in the engine bay. Its easy, and I'd rather do it and not need to, than need to and not do it.

Also go ahead and pull your engine cover off

Next, you need to get your secondary air pump out of the way. Disconnect the two hoses on the top of your pump, and then remove the Three (3) 6mm Hex bolts connecting the Bracket to the intake manifold (Circled in Blue). You cannot see one of them in the picture, but just follow the bracket towards the middle of the car, and you'll find it.
You do not need to unbolt the pump from the bracket, or disconnect the electrical connector connector. just move it out of the way to the left.
Do not attempt to use any Standard size hex bit or allen key. You will most likely strip it. Standard sizes are either too big or too small, just do it right and use metric bits or keys.
(Circled in Purple) Be careful when working with your secondary air pump. There is rubber bumpers that connect the pump to the bracket, and they can become very brittle. As you can see in the picture, mine are cracked and dry rotted. I'm about to replace mine as well.


Next, You're left with the coil pack exposed. Its easier if you leave the electrical connector for the coil pack on it, until you get it unbolted and out of there. Its then much easier to wiggle off. BUT, you'll want to disconnect the harness for the wires, its right in front of the bottom of the coil pack (circled in green).



Try to wiggle the spark plug wires off of the coil pack. This can be difficult, but try not to spin them too much, you don't want to screw your wires. and this will happen to you



Once you get all four wires off, you'll want to unscrew the Three (3) 5mm Hex bolts , now's also a good time to inspect the coil pack end of your spark plug wires. Check for dry rotting, cracks, cuts, etc. take note of anything you see, because if you have any problems with misfires after replacing your coil pack, and you check the obd or vagcom, this will help you narrow down the problem.



If you're using an allen key, these bolts can be difficult to break loose. If you don't already know this trick, go ahead and do this. It will give you more space and leverage so you can break it slowly and easily, and not bang up your knuckles.



From there, just unhook the electrical connector on the coil pack, and reassemble in reverse! Make sure you connect the spark plug wires in the correct order, as noted above, and Do your best not to strip the bolts supporting the pump bracket, sometimes they'll want to go in a little crooked.

Start her up and take her for a spin!
Happy wrenching!


^Dirty Gerty haha^
(If you can't tell I live on a farm)

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks bud :beer:
Just trying to help out, the way others have done for me! :thumbup:

Any requests just let me know!

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Will do!
God I can tell already I'm gonna love having a mod around :laugh:

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gonna re-edit and upload these pics tonight so they're clear and visible

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How about measuring resistance?

Hey great writeup Knvern! The internet is lacking a little in help/info on troubleshooting the coil packs for the AZG, AVH, BEV, and BBW engines. Of course I did not create a user account just to say thanks :laugh:

So I have a 2002 beetle with the 2.0 AZG. Same coil pack as pictured in your thread here. Right now this thread only covers the water spray test, which I did in a dark garage with my car but could not see any arcing. This may simply have been because its hard to see around the air pump, I don't know, but I thought it may also be because the coil(s) inside are simple dead.

So the spray test didn't work out for me... car is idling very rough and throwing misfire codes left and right. Spark plugs and wires were replaced last year before I got the car with the cheapest junk they could find.. I have looked at my spark plugs and they seem ok. I have measured all the spark plug wires and they are just barely within the 4-6k ohms range so they should be alright. That leaves the coil... it appears to be the original.

In my Haynes manual they say the coil should read 4-6k ohms between the connectors for plugs 1&4 and 2&3 BUT they picture the older style coil pack... When I try to measure the resistance on this slightly newer style pack I get infinite resistance between 1&4 and 2&3. My meter doesn't even blip, which makes me wonder:

Can these newer style coil packs (with the plug connectors in a straight line) be tested the same way the old four-corners style ones are? ie, is that test still valid for my pack? Or is there any other way to probe the pack to determine if its ok inside?

Or am I just doing something wrong?

Thanks, hopefully nobody minds me digging up this thread but if there is a test besides the water mist test that can be done for this style of coil pack it seems like it would be a good addition to the thread :)
 

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You know I was thinking this is why I'm intermittently throwing random misfire on cylinders 1-4 on starts! It always throws on a semi-warm start- engine not quite up to temp but not cold enough to go in closed loop warmup mode thing. Looks like a new coilpack is in my future. Awesome write up! :thumbup::thumbup:
 

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You know I was thinking this is why I'm intermittently throwing random misfire on cylinders 1-4 on starts! It always throws on a semi-warm start- engine not quite up to temp but not cold enough to go in closed loop warmup mode thing. Looks like a new coilpack is in my future. Awesome write up! :thumbup::thumbup:
To follow up, so far so good. No P0300-P0304 codes yet. This full write up takes 30 minutes to complete, less if you have a cold motor and aren't burning yourself on a hot engine block!

Added bonus: new coilpack seems to have restored some torque I felt like I had lost over the years. In adding some low band torque, it appears I've picked up 2-3MPG (noticed last night and this morning)!
 

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I ended up buying a cheap aftermarket coil pack, a friend checked on alldata and it seems there is no way to test this particular coil pack at home with your multimeter. The new aftermarket coil pack works fine but as others have mentioned the connector housing is a little iffy and prone to letting the connector loose when bumped/wiggled. I tie-strapped it down and haven't had any issues since.
 

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Stupid thing is failing on mine now when it's -22C. I sprayed it with WD40, see if it will help till paycheck in fhew days to buy a new one.:thumbdown:
 
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