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I have this one:

http://www.amazon.com/America-5060-Topsider-Multi-Purpose-Removing/dp/B001445IZ8



Pros:

Like the solid metal construction. Seems well put together
Sucks out as much oil as draining from below
Lets me keep the Miata and the Alfa on the ground for oil changes

Cons:
Doesn't work with my wife's Equinox. Dipstick tube has a restriction in it- apparently this happens with some cars
Hard to tell how much you have extracted-no sight glass
 

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Used this one on oil changes for an E350 and TDI. It removed maybe 1/4qt less than the recommended pour.

It was a little finicky getting a good seal on the tube, but once you do it removes the oil fine. :thumbup:


 

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So these get the oil out - I get that.

But what about the filter? Are you not changing the filter every time, or....?
I use a MityVac hooked up to my compressor. Does the trick.

I change my filter each time, too. Proper cars have the filter conveniently located under the hood. Unscrew top of canister, remove filter, put in new filter. Easy peasy. :thumbup:
 

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I feel like the last bit of oil a pump won't get will be the 1/4 to 1/2 quart with the most sediment/crud in it. If you're changing the filter you'll have to have the drain pan out anyways, so I don't see why you wouldn't pull the drain plug.
 

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I feel like the last bit of oil a pump won't get will be the 1/4 to 1/2 quart with the most sediment/crud in it. If you're changing the filter you'll have to have the drain pan out anyways, so I don't see why you wouldn't pull the drain plug.
Correctly placed, it should get as much oil out as the drain- perhaps more actually because it doesn't have to clear any "hump" to the drain plug.

Why would you have to pull the drain plug to change the filter? Not necessary on either of my cars.
 

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So these get the oil out - I get that.

But what about the filter? Are you not changing the filter every time, or....?
What does a vacuum oil extractor have to do with changing the filter? Suck the oil out, remove the filter, if it's a top-load cartridge then use the extractor to suck the remaining oil out of the canister... re-installation is the reverse of removal. Using an oil extractor means never having to drop the bellypan or skid plate and never dealing with the oil-pan drain bolt, it's way cleaner and much easier than draining the pan from under the car.

I have a Pella 6000 6-liter with the ribbed translucent plastic bubble so it's easy to see how much oil has been drawn, just make sure the engine is warm so the oil flows nicely. Had to replace the black braided hose section when it was shredded by a windage tray and sucked air instead of oil - went to TSC and found plain poly hose in the same size, works like many charms, would recommend, much suck, no mess, so wow.

 

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Correctly placed, it should get as much oil out as the drain- perhaps more actually because it doesn't have to clear any "hump" to the drain plug.

Why would you have to pull the drain plug to change the filter? Not necessary on either of my cars.
Re-read what I said. I said if you're going to change the filter, you'll probably have a drain pan out, in which case you might as well pull the drain plug to drain the oil, i.e., instead of using a pump.

I'm not sure what you mean about a "hump".:confused:
 

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What does a vacuum oil extractor have to do with changing the filter? Suck the oil out, remove the filter, if it's a top-load cartridge then use the extractor to suck the remaining oil out of the canister... re-installation is the reverse of removal. Using an oil extractor means never having to drop the bellypan or skid plate and never dealing with the oil-pan drain bolt, it's way cleaner and much easier than draining the pan from under the car.

I have a Pella 6000 6-liter with the ribbed translucent plastic bubble so it's easy to see how much oil has been drawn, just make sure the engine is warm so the oil flows nicely. Had to replace the black braided hose section when it was shredded by a windage tray and sucked air instead of oil - went to TSC and found plain poly hose in the same size, works like many charms, would recommend, much suck, no mess, so wow.

You are aware that not all cars use canister-type filters, right? Not only do (many, many...many) cars use spin-on filters, they're often mounted such that you need to be under the car to access them.
 

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Re-read what I said. I said if you're going to change the filter, you'll probably have a drain pan out, in which case you might as well pull the drain plug to drain the oil, i.e., instead of using a pump.

I'm not sure what you mean about a "hump".:confused:
Plastic bag around the filter works. Drain pan doesn't work anyways on some cars where the oil filter is high on the block. The main point is you can keep the car on the ground. Some cars are low enough you can't get a pan underneath with the car on the ground.

By "hump" I mean that the bottom of the drain plug isn't the actual bottom point of the pan- it's a mm or two above. There's always a tiny bit left. In theory, a suction device could get almost every drop.
 

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I have the Pela and it's ok, but a lot of pumping. It's been pretty handy for a lot of other things though. The parts press-fit on, so you have to hold the pump mechanism down as you pump it, otherwise it will detach.

I bought one from HF that hooks to my compressor, it's a lot less work and holds a huge amount of oil.

I'm sold on the concept. Once in a while if I have to remove the belly pan for other work I'll drain the oil the regular way.

I have cartridge filters that remove from the top.
 

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You are aware that not all cars use canister-type filters, right? Not only do (many, many...many) cars use spin-on filters, they're often mounted such that you need to be under the car to access them.
Very much so. Works fine for me and my cars, your mileage may vary, etc. One has to assume that a DIY-type person has enough common sense to consider such things, right? :beer: Plus, there are some spin-on filter engines that can still be accessed from above.
 

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What does a vacuum oil extractor have to do with changing the filter? Suck the oil out, remove the filter, if it's a top-load cartridge then use the extractor to suck the remaining oil out of the canister... re-installation is the reverse of removal. Using an oil extractor means never having to drop the bellypan or skid plate and never dealing with the oil-pan drain bolt, it's way cleaner and much easier than draining the pan from under the car.

I have a Pella 6000 6-liter with the ribbed translucent plastic bubble so it's easy to see how much oil has been drawn, just make sure the engine is warm so the oil flows nicely. Had to replace the black braided hose section when it was shredded by a windage tray and sucked air instead of oil - went to TSC and found plain poly hose in the same size, works like many charms, would recommend, much suck, no mess, so wow.

How long have you had yours? I've had mine since 2012 or so and lately it seems like its losing vacuum and I have to pump it a few more times to get all of the oil out. I guess I have to check two seals?
 

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How long have you had yours? I've had mine since 2012 or so and lately it seems like its losing vacuum and I have to pump it a few more times to get all of the oil out. I guess I have to check two seals?
Had mine for just a few years now, and its also losing suction. I had a topsider before, and may go back.

They do make changing oil fast and easy. I've never had "gunk" come out while draining a pan conventionally, so I'm not too concerned about it.
 

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After reading through this I'm tempted to pull the trigger. For the price it seems worth it to keep me from having to block the car, jack it up, put in stands, place the pan and oil container then get under and do the drain.

The GLI is easy for the filter as it sits on top of the motor, the Jeep OTOH has it mounted at an angle underneath with a little V-shape bracket that is supposed to let the excess slide down easily. It never really works but I wonder if using a vacuum tool like these would alleviate a lot of that?

The Topsider is on amazon for $50, and then there is the MightVac for $77. Is the metal one preferred or is it worth the extra $20 for the plastic one?


 

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I bought the Topsider based on a recommendation in another thread like this here recently and have been very happy with it. Yes, you still have to put the car up to pull the filter on most cars (although this will be great for my 190e with its cartridge filter accessible from the top). Still, the main place that I am most apt to make a mess in an oil change is in pulling the drain plug where the oil comes gushing out quickly. This negates that issue, and seals up the oil in a nice compact, leak free container for the trip to be recycled. (I've never had an oil pan that actually seals all that well). For that reason alone I went with the Topsider over the Mightyvac below as the plastic cylinder looked apt to tip over in the back of the car when taking it in.
 
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