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Hey TESLA owners and fans, do you find Elon Musk repulsive?

  • I have another reason that Elon is hated yet so successful (tell us oh wise one)

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  • Whatever, TCL is just jealous of Tesla and its marvelous cars

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Now let's hear it from TCL Tesla owners and fans! :p



Dennis Levitt got his first Tesla, a blue Model S, in 2013, and loved it. “It was so much better than any car I've ever driven,” the 73-year-old self-storage company executive says.
He bought into the brand as well as Elon Musk, Tesla Inc.’s charismatic chief executive officer, purchasing another Model S the following year and driving the first one across the country. In 2016, he stood in line at a showroom near his suburban Los Angeles home to be one of the first to order two Model 3s — one for himself, the other for his wife.

“I was a total Musk fanboy,” Levitt says.
Was, because while Levitt still loves his Teslas, he’s soured on Musk.
“Over time, his public statements have really come to bother me,” Levitt said, citing the CEO’s spats with US President Joe Biden, among others. “He acts like a seven-year-old.”
"We hear from Tesla owners who will say, ‘Look, I love my vehicle, but I really wish I didn't have to respond to my friends and family about his latest tweet.’”
Before it was reported Musk had an affair with Sergey Brin’s wife, which he’s denied; before his slipshod deal, then no-deal, to acquire Twitter Inc.; before the revelation he fathered twins with an executive at his brain-interface startup Neuralink; before SpaceX fired employees who called him “a frequent source of distraction and embarrassment”; before his daughter changed her name and legal gender after his history of mocking pronouns; before an article said SpaceX paid an employee $250,000 to settle a claim he sexually harassed her, allegations he’s called untrue; Musk’s behavior was putting off prospective customers and perturbing some Tesla owners.
The trends have shown up in one consumer survey and market research report after another: Tesla commands high brand awareness, consideration and loyalty, and customers are mostly delighted by its cars. Musk’s antics, on the other hand? They could do without.
Creative Strategies, a California-based customer-experience measurer, mentioned owner frustration with Musk in a study it published in April. A year earlier, research firm Escalent found Musk was the most negative aspect of the Tesla brand among electric-vehicle owners surveyed.
“We hear from Tesla owners who will say, ‘Look, I love my vehicle, but I really wish I didn't have to respond to my friends and family about his latest tweet,’” says Mike Dovorany, who spoke with thousands of EV owners and potential buyers during his two years working in Escalent’s automotive and mobility group.
Tesla has so far had no trouble growing its way through Musk’s many controversies. The dip in vehicle deliveries the company reported last quarter was its first sequential decline since early 2020 and largely had to do with Covid lockdowns in Shanghai forcing its most productive factory to shut for weeks. Competitors that have been chasing the company for a decade may still be years away from catching up in the EV sales ranks.


Musk’s star power, built in no small part by his activity on Twitter — the same forum where he’s become such a lightning rod — has contributed immensely to Tesla, especially since it’s shunned traditional advertising. His steady stream of online banter, punctuated with the occasional grandiose announcement or stunt (see: shooting a Roadster into space) keeps Tesla in the headlines. During the company’s earlier days, the trolling and glib comments were a feature, not a bug. They allowed Musk to shape media coverage and made him the ringleader for Tesla’s legion of very-online fans.
But after making Tesla and himself so synonymous with one another, Musk has waded into political conflicts, attempted to buy one of the world’s most influential social media platforms and struggled to bat back unflattering coverage of his personal life, putting the company’s increasingly valuable brand at risk.
Jerry James Stone, a 48-year-old chef in Sacramento, California, who teaches his 219,000 YouTube channel subscribers how to make vegan and vegetarian meals, drives a Volkswagen Beetle convertible and plans to go electric with his next car. He isn’t sure yet which model, but certain it won’t be a Tesla.
“Elon has just soiled that brand for me so much that I don't even think I would take one if I won one,” Stone says. “You have this guy who's the richest dude in the world, who has this huge megaphone, and he uses it to call somebody a pedophile who's not, or to fat-shame people, all these things that are just kind of gross.”
"We've seen among the early adopters more of a willingness to take risks or to put up with things that are out of the ordinary. We're not seeing that as much with incoming buyers.”
According to Strategic Vision, a U.S. research firm that consults auto companies, some 39% of car buyers say they wouldn’t consider a Tesla. That’s not necessarily out of the ordinary — almost half of respondents say they won’t consider German luxury brands. But Tesla does lag more mass-market brands: Toyota, for example, is only off the shopping list for 23% of drivers.
Emma Sirr, a 28-year-old worker in cloud computing who lives in Bozeman, Montana, gets around with her partner and their two dogs in a 2004 Nissan Frontier. They've been researching EVs for about three years and until recently considered Teslas the only viable option, given their range and the charging infrastructure the company has built in their area. But they refused to buy one because of Musk, their main gripes being his politics, staff turnover at the company and its cavalier approach to autonomous-driving technology.
“We took Tesla off the table from the get-go,” Sirr says. She and her partner have their eyes on the Kia Niro and Chevrolet Bolt as possible alternatives. “As consumers, our power is what we buy. I think younger generations in particular vote with their wallets, and I feel like that might come back to bite.”

For much of the past decade, Tesla lacked competitors that matched its models’ battery range and other measures of performance. Consumers put off by Musk’s mischief had few EVs to turn to. As legacy automakers introduce more capable electric models, Tesla won’t have as much leeway.
“We've seen among the early adopters more of a willingness to take risks or to put up with things that are out of the ordinary,” says Dovorany, who left Escalent for an automotive tech startup earlier this year. “We're not seeing that as much with incoming buyers.” To win this cohort, automakers need to check every box, and for some, that includes employing a CEO who doesn’t share Hitler memes on social media.
Levitt, the self-described former Musk fanboy, took a test ride last month in a Lucid. He wasn’t sold on it, partly he says because it didn’t have enough cargo space for his golf gear. He’s still waiting for another automaker to steal him away from Tesla and considering models from Audi, Mercedes and BMW.
“If you take Mr. Musk and his antics out of the equation, I'm about 98% certain that my next car would be a Tesla,” Levitt says. “His antics put me in play.”
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As a Tesla owner, I don't really care about what Elon says/does in his personal life -- I care about the product. It doesn't change the fact that I like my car and the fact that it's well-built (knock-on wood, some aren't as lucky) and serves our family well. I think Zuckerberg is a douche, but I still use Facebook. I don't agree with Chick-fil-a's prior donations in opposition to the LGBTQ community, but I still GLADLY eat there.
 
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As a Tesla owner, I don't really care about what Elon says/does. It doesn't change the fact that I like my car and the fact that it's well-built (knock-on wood, some aren't as lucky) and serves our family well. I think Zuckerberg is a douche, but I still use Facebook. I don't agree with Chick-fil-a's prior donations in opposition to the LGBTQ community, but I still GLADLY eat there.
I ****ing love CFA. I ****ing love it so much. I took my wife there for the first time and her eyes basically rolled into the back of her head. There's something in the meat.
 

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I ****ing love CFA. I ****ing love it so much. I took my wife there for the first time and her eyes basically rolled into the back of her head. There's something in the meat.
Too bad your meat never did the eye roll trick for her :LOL: j/k

But yeah, I've been eating at Chick-fil-a since I was kid. Back then, it was a treat because we didn't go that often since it was expensive as f**k compared to McDs. But when we did go, YUM-O!

Now, as a 40-something, our family goes a couple of times a month; and I MUST have my lemonade :) They also have the nicest employees in fast food, PERIOD.
 

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Omg you guys both are supporting evil cfa cancelled /s

i stopped going cuz they keep making mistakes and take forever lol. Im in a bright blue state and theres lines that extend past the main road so theyre doing just fine.
 

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He's annoying AF. If I had a Tesla, I think I'd be a little irritated that it would constantly remind me of him. But I think I'd be more irritated that I didn't have a dashboard display.
 

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Omg you guys both are supporting evil cfa cancelled /s

i stopped going cuz they keep making mistakes and take forever lol. Im in a bright blue state and theres lines that extend past the main road so theyre doing just fine.
You must have patience for The Lord's Chicken :LOL:
 

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As a Tesla owner, I don't really care about what Elon says/does in his personal life -- I care about the product. It doesn't change the fact that I like my car and the fact that it's well-built (knock-on wood, some aren't as lucky) and serves our family well. I think Zuckerberg is a douche, but I still use Facebook. I don't agree with Chick-fil-a's prior donations in opposition to the LGBTQ community, but I still GLADLY eat there.
As a general rule, I don't go digging into the lives of business owners to find out their political views. I know that a whole lot of people have views opposed to mine, and just is what it is. I'm not going to boycott half the world in order to try and make a point.

That all changes when a business owner decides to make a very public stand on an issue that I disagree with. CFA is a great example, since the Cathy family is very open and public about being anti-LGBTQ. Because of this, I no longer give them my business. I'm a guitarist that plays metal, and I used to be a huge Iced Earth fan. I see used to be, since Jon Schaffer (the founder and band leader) decided to take part on 1/6 and was caught macing a cop. So, I deleted all of his music of my iPhone and moved on with my life. Elon Musk is an easier case, since don't see the appeal in Teslas (not all EVs, just Teslas), but his antics have pretty much guaranteed I'll never spend a dime on anything with his name attached to it. I agree that Mark Zucerberg is a douche, but notice that he is very careful to not take a public stance on hot button issues.

So, if you own business, you need to keep your damn mouth shut. No matter your political views. My wife own a pet sitting business, and she happily accepts money from people who think the election was stolen from Trump, as well as people who think the DNC robbed Bernie. She just keeps her lips buttoned and cashes those checks. I cannot fathom why anyone in business wouldn't do the same.
 

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As a general rule, I don't go digging into the lives of business owners to find out their political views. I know that a whole lot of people have views opposed to mine, and just is what it is. I'm not going to boycott half the world in order to try and make a point.

That all changes when a business owner decides to make a very public stand on an issue that I disagree with. CFA is a great example, since the Cathy family is very open and public about being anti-LGBTQ. Because of this, I no longer give them my business. I'm a guitarist that plays metal, and I used to be a huge Iced Earth fan. I see used to be, since Jon Schaffer (the founder and band leader) decided to take part on 1/6 and was caught macing a cop. So, I deleted all of his music of my iPhone and moved on with my life. Elon Musk is an easier case, since don't see the appeal in Teslas (not all EVs, just Teslas), but his antics have pretty much guaranteed I'll never spend a dime on anything with his name attached to it. I agree that Mark Zucerberg is a douche, but notice that he is very careful to not take a public stance on hot button issues.

So, if you own business, you need to keep your damn mouth shut. No matter your political views. My wife own a pet sitting business, and she happily accepts money from people who think the election was stolen from Trump, as well as people who think the DNC robbed Bernie. She just keeps her lips buttoned and cashes those checks. I cannot fathom why anyone in business wouldn't do the same.
So is this akin to "Shut up and dribble?"

Humans are going to human. People can have a different viewpoint from me, I don't care. I can still be agreeable with you. My father-in-law is staunchly anti-gay marriage, and is opposite of me on many hot-button issues (you can probably guess the other big one). But we still get along -- not because I have to because he's my FIL -- but because I genuinely love the guy and his views don't define our relationship.
 

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So is this akin to "Shut up and dribble?"

Humans are going to human. People can have a different viewpoint from me, I don't care. I can still be agreeable with you. My father-in-law is staunchly anti-gay marriage, and is opposite of me on many hot-button issues (you can probably guess the other big one). But we still get along -- not because I have to because he's my FIL -- but because I genuinely love the guy and his views don't define our relationship.
It’s because you are a mentally healthy individual who can abide by people who sometimes think differently from yourself.

The internet has taught me that is much less common than I previously thought.
 

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So is this akin to "Shut up and dribble?"

Humans are going to human. People can have a different viewpoint from me, I don't care. I can still be agreeable with you. My father-in-law is staunchly anti-gay marriage, and is opposite of me on many hot-button issues (you can probably guess the other big one). But we still get along -- not because I have to because he's my FIL -- but because I genuinely love the guy and his views don't define our relationship.
No, it's nothing like shut up and dribble. It's more like common sense if you own a business selling goods and services to public. Why would you want to make public statements about hot button issues? You're going to alienate a large chunk of your potential customer base. It makes no sense to me.

Our daughter is bi, and she basically no longer talks to my MIL, who is a young earth creationist that is anti-LGBT and anti-abortion. I'll never understand the concept that family is supposed to get along no matter what. If your attitude is we can have our differences and still love one another, then obviously the differences aren't a pattern of voting that is aimed at eliminating your rights. YOU may get along with your FIL, but I bet there are people in his own family who think he's an *******. ;)
 

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I cast my vote:

PRESIDENT!

:cool:

I'm so tired of career politicians and all of the calculated tactics.

Elon or Jon Stewart as POTUS would be goodtimes!

Would have deffo voted for CFA if it was an option tho, dang, anybody here remember in the wayback when they made that spectacular brownie à la mode? The warm brownie with soft serve ice cream on top, wow it was good.

That dessert should have never been taken away and I'm slightly disgruntled for the loss, but not as angry as I am at Taco Bell for discontinuing the Enchirito which was a longtime favorite of mine.
 

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I think my real issue with Musk, and many other CEOs of new companies lately is that they just seem so f**king immature and like genuinely bad people. The whole 420, S,3,X,Y thing wasn't even cool in 1997, saying you'll solve world hunger if someone could give you a roadmap is essentially "Give me a good reason to solve this blight on millions of people, otherwise I have no motivation to help." The tunnels, cyber truck, etc. He just constantly reminds me of an insecure rich kid in a schoolyard.

And the whole narrative of a billionaire as someone people admire is so insanely absurd and gross too. Billionaires shouldn't exist. Everyone (rightly) rails on politicians for being sleazy and always being out for their own interests. Do they just need to make cars so everyone forgets that and starts loving them?

It's all very weird.
 

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My thoughts don't fit any of the categories. I admire certain qualities of Elon. I think he had a Seve Jobs-like vision for what cars could be in Tesla, and seeing the vertical landing technology of SpaceX through is going to be a game changer for space that will pay dividends a long time in the future. I know he didn't personally invent any technologies, but pushing them through by force of will shouldn't be taken lightly. On the other hand, I hate his lack of regard for his workers, his lack of concern for quality, and his personal actions which suggest a general lack of empathy for others.

As for Tesla cars, I think they are still the benchmark for a good reason. I wish they were made better, but they are still quite compelling against the EV competition. The Cybertruck gets some well-deserved hate for its funky looks, but it could also be a similar benchmark from a pure price/performance standpoint.
 
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