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Discussion Starter · #201 · (Edited)

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Currently IRS form 8936 (ev credit form) does not include a Part related to a binding contract or the date one was entered into. I’m not sure if they will update it for 2022 tax season. Otherwise it’s just year make model, VIN, and date placed into service.

If they do update it with a part for the binding contract, the person filling will need to know what qualifies as a binding contract. Lots of ways to interpret a paid reservation or locked order. I imagine most people that are filing their taxes themselves will just assume the order is the contract and move on to the child tax credit, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #204 ·
Currently IRS form 8936 (ev credit form) does not include a Part related to a binding contract or the date one was entered into. I’m not sure if they will update it for 2022 taxes. Otherwise it’s just year make model, VIN, and date placed into service.

If they do update it with a part for the binding contract, the person filling will need to know what qualifies as a binding contract. Lots of ways to interpret a paid reservation or locked order. I imagine most people that are filing their taxes themselves will just assume the order is the contract and move on to the child tax credit, etc.
They aren't going to update a form for a new law until that new law is actually passed (and even then probably not until very close to the filing deadline, perhaps even the extended filing deadline). Since this is a fairly limited exception, I doubt they are going to aggressively audit whether the contract was binding.
 

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They aren't going to update a form for a new law until that new law is actually passed (and even then probably not until very close to the filing deadline, perhaps even the extended filing deadline). Since this is a fairly limited exception, I doubt they are going to aggressively audit whether the contract was binding.
Ah, filing deadline is the term I should have used. I think people that are waiting for an existing order to be delivered this fall are getting worked up over nothing. They bought a qualifying EV in 2022 that was put into service by Dec 31.
 

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If they do update it with a part for the binding contract, the person filling will need to know what qualifies as a binding contract. Lots of ways to interpret a paid reservation or locked order. I imagine most people that are filing their taxes themselves will just assume the order is the contract and move on to the child tax credit, etc.
The articles have said that Pete Buttigieg is supposed to have final say in terms of the regulation that defines the interpretation of the law once it's passed. That way they get to leave the law somewhat vague to get it to pass, then have Pete work out the details to make sure they didn't just screw all the taxpayers and automakers alike. I'm honestly not too worried about it, as Pete's entire job with this is to make sure the law works in practice.
 

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Too bad. The pandemic revealed that the WTO simply made the entire planet vulnerable to supply chain disruptions rather than only having regional supply chain risks. Global trade made things cheaper in the short run but more expensive in the long run because we're excessively vulnerable to supply chain disruptions. We shouldn't have 0% tariffs with any country. Not even Mexico or Canada, but they should be the cheapest, like maybe 5%. Europe should be 10%, Asia 20% and up to perhaps 200% depending on how democratic the government of the country in question is. So Japan and South Korea could be 20% but China should be a 200% import tariff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #210 ·
Too bad. The pandemic revealed that the WTO simply made the entire planet vulnerable to supply chain disruptions rather than only having regional supply chain risks. Global trade made things cheaper in the short run but more expensive in the long run because we're excessively vulnerable to supply chain disruptions. We shouldn't have 0% tariffs with any country. Not even Mexico or Canada, but they should be the cheapest, like maybe 5%. Europe should be 10%, Asia 20% and up to perhaps 200% depending on how democratic the government of the country in question is. So Japan and South Korea could be 20% but China should be a 200% import tariff.
This presupposes that domestic supply chains are uniquely immune from disruption. Concentration of sources is a problem no matter what source you are talking about.
 

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They purposely write things like this to make it confusing.
By "They", you mean lawyers and politicians, right?
The ballot questions served up by my overwhelmingly Democrat controlled state legislature are just as lawyerific and purposefully difficult to understand with a cursory glance and engineering degree.

Most voters look for clues on how to think in the form of "Your Party Delegate says to Vote Yes on #2"
 

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Discussion Starter · #212 ·
By "They", you mean lawyers and politicians, right?
The ballot questions served up by my overwhelmingly Democrat controlled state legislature are just as lawyerific and purposefully difficult to understand with a cursory glance and engineering degree.

Most voters look for clues on how to think in the form of "Your Party Delegate says to Vote Yes on #2"
Republicans control 30/50 state legislatures.


Besides, I’ve seen more than my share of state wide initiatives here in Texas that are more than a bit confusing, even for a lawyer.
 

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Republicans control 30/50 state legislatures.
So?
Politicians and Lawyers control 50/50 state legislatures. They are the "They", because by nature, that is what lawyers and politicians do. Any other suggestion of who "They" are, is entirely dishonest.
 

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So?
Politicians and Lawyers control 50/50 state legislatures. They are the "They", because by nature, that is what lawyers and politicians do. Any other suggestion of who "They" are, is entirely dishonest.
‘They’ are people who make money by being in control. The two party system is ****ed, most of these long-term politicians and their lawyers and the think tanks who get paid to pontificate on the whole mess are cut from the same cloth. D or R, I dislike anyone who aspires to a lifetime career of politics.

His point about 30/50 speaks to certain ‘they/thems’ who take stances that range from regressive and antiquated to supportive of human rights abuses.
 

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His point about 30/50...
...is only barely relevant if one deludes themselves into thinking the purposefully confusing ballot question legalese is a new thing and exclusive to the current power split.

But it's not.
 

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This presupposes that domestic supply chains are uniquely immune from disruption. Concentration of sources is a problem no matter what source you are talking about.
Not immune, but it reduces complexity. Everyone knows that the more complex a system is, the more points of failure it has. Manufacturing things on a regional basis, say, Asia, Europe, N. America, S. America, Africa, and perhaps oceana would mean that instead of the entire world getting cut off due to lockdowns in one province in China, or a blockade of Taiwan, you have 5+ global regions each of which deals with its own local supply. Then if Asia breaks down, you still have 4/5 global regions producing goods while the 1 region is out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #217 ·
...is only barely relevant if one deludes themselves into thinking the purposefully confusing ballot question legalese is a new thing and exclusive to the current power split.

But it's not.
You were the one who brought up primarily Democratic legislators. I agree it has nothing to do with the power split.
 

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Discussion Starter · #218 ·
Not immune, but it reduces complexity. Everyone knows that the more complex a system is, the more points of failure it has. Manufacturing things on a regional basis, say, Asia, Europe, N. America, S. America, Africa, and perhaps oceana would mean that instead of the entire world getting cut off due to lockdowns in one province in China, or a blockade of Taiwan, you have 5+ global regions each of which deals with its own local supply. Then if Asia breaks down, you still have 4/5 global regions producing goods while the 1 region is out.
Complexity and fragility are two different things.
 

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You were the one who brought up...
...while asking for clarification on who "They" were, because I was detecting outrage based on myopic and historically blind perception.
 
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