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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ever wonder what the inside of a Fuse Box looks like?


I took a 89 Cabriolet Fuse Box and opened it up.




Pry the side tabs loose while popping the top loose




The back side of the front panel.


What the insides looks like.




You can see some corrosion in F1 and f2 fingers.


I would of taken it further apart, but the traces are heat welded to plastic mounting tabs, the black dots, and the pins to the rear are
press riveted to the traces too. No I wasn't going to destroy a perfectly good Fuse panel.

I am thinking if yours isn't too corroded or burnt, then soaking it in TarnX bath may safely remove the tarnish and corrosion.
Be sure to flush with water, and allow to dry prior to re-assembly.

Also it is quite possible that you can smack tighten some of the pins to get a better connection if warranted.
 

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1990 Cabriolet, 2004 VW Golf TDI
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Oooooooh, Ahhhhhhh.

Can't I just fix it by putting it in a bag of rice??:laugh:

But seriously, that's pretty cool. Thanks, man.
 

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I once had the spot for the fuel pump relay (power side) melt into the plastic. Bought I new one from GAP for 130 bucks. After about 1 hour trying to start my car, my dad mentioned I should put the old back in. So I took it apart, pulled the metal post away from the plastic and shoved a piece of silicone hose behind it so it couldn't melt into the plastic. Put that back in and car started right up. I returned the box to GAP for refund and later bought a better unit.

My point is that finding one without corrosion was hard and if this so called TarnX works, that would be awesome! Keep us posted. Thank you
 

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I've considered doing something like this to my old fusebox, and I still might. I'm still reasonably convinced I've got electric gremlins.
 

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78rabbit1.5LGP & 82rabbitpickup1.6DGC
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your insides are made of brass
which is far more resistant to corrosion

the early fuse boxes are made of zinc clad which apparently much more easily absorbs rust deposits


thanks for your efforts and pictoral!
 
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