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Good move or bad move? FIAT announces that company is going all-electric starting in 2025.

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Are you serious? When the whole nation added air conditioning to homes, we were able to ramp up electricity production. When we added televisions to every room, we were able to meet electrical needs. It's been gone over before, in case you weren't paying attention, but making all the cars electric in the US, will barely require any additional power production, and it's actually easy to add the capacity, especially since, unlike AC use, EV charging is predominantly done at night, when plants are already ramped DOWN.

Here, watch this and pay attention:

Yea....but at the same time look what happened to Texas....not all areas are ready for it, and thats with less then 3% of that state even drives a EV.
 

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I'm not sure that the 37 people in the US that bought a Fiat will care.
Hahah, i have no brand loyalty to Fiat, generally i think their cars are terrible, i only bought mine because its not even a Fiat drivetrain. Its a Bosch drive train very much like what VW uses in their e-Golf, the main difference is Fiat opted to put active battery cooling via liquid and Freon plates. That and the car was stupid cheap second hand at less then $8k with only 20k miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·

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Yea....but at the same time look what happened to Texas....not all areas are ready for it, and thats with less then 3% of that state even drives a EV.
That's the Republican legislature that made sure that, even though 10 years ago that exact scenario was brought up as a potential problem by them, they did nothing about it. AND Texas had made sure they were not grid-tied to the rest of the US, so were unable to even import electricity. Has zero to do with EVs. Gas cars were unable to get gas then, either. What happened in Texas is highly unlikely in teh rest of the nation. But with the Texas legislature, probably no lessons were actually learned.

BTW, people in Texas with EVs during that cold snap were able to run their cars in their garages with the heaters on and keep the occupants alive without CO poisoning... One of my fellow Bolt owners there actually ran the car for two weeks in the garage and only used up 2/3rds of their battery charge.
 

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That's the Republican legislature that made sure that, even though 10 years ago that exact scenario was brought up as a potential problem by them, they did nothing about it. AND Texas had made sure they were not grid-tied to the rest of the US, so were unable to even import electricity. Has zero to do with EVs. Gas cars were unable to get gas then, either. What happened in Texas is highly unlikely in teh rest of the nation. But with the Texas legislature, probably no lessons were actually learned.

BTW, people in Texas with EVs during that cold snap were able to run their cars in their garages with the heaters on and keep the occupants alive without CO poisoning... One of my fellow Bolt owners there actually ran the car for two weeks in the garage and only used up 2/3rds of their battery charge.

Everyone I know got stranded because of no power in their tesseractlahs, a la charging stations were dead. Some ended up getting a hotel for several thousand a night. They are in the process of moving away from TX now, for various reasons... or have already moved away. Hard lesson learned from that one storm, which is not uncommon.

Also, if a bill isn't passed through the parties, it's not a "we didn't try" situation, which you make it sound like. It's not even a party, call up some cats, squirrels and a cage, and you have a party.
 

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Everyone I know got stranded because of no power in their tesseractlahs, a la charging stations were dead. Some ended up getting a hotel for several thousand a night. They are in the process of moving away from TX now, for various reasons... or have already moved away. Hard lesson learned from that one storm, which is not uncommon.

Also, if a bill isn't passed through the parties, it's not a "we didn't try" situation, which you make it sound like. It's not even a party, call up some cats, squirrels and a cage, and you have a party.
I believe none of this. :)
 

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Wouldn’t the federalization process be even cheaper for an EV because the only testing procedure to meet is crashworthiness (and the FMVSS lighting/bumper regulations)?

Id love a new-gen 500e. The previous gen is widely praised.
 

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I believe none of this. :)

One of them is actually family. He got a quote for over double what my gasser would cost to transport the car. Citing risk and how heavy the car was. He was proud that he planned his superelectronchargers route, but I told him to expect needing charging sooner, citing low temps, headwinds and elevation changes. These things drastically affect BEV range.

He's supposed to touch base already, probably didn't make it. I should call him and see if he took my advice. Ok, I lied, I actually suggested he junk the toy car and get a turbo porsche as he would make it up here a lot faster.
 

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That's the Republican legislature that made sure that, even though 10 years ago that exact scenario was brought up as a potential problem by them, they did nothing about it. AND Texas had made sure they were not grid-tied to the rest of the US, so were unable to even import electricity. Has zero to do with EVs. Gas cars were unable to get gas then, either. What happened in Texas is highly unlikely in teh rest of the nation. But with the Texas legislature, probably no lessons were actually learned.

BTW, people in Texas with EVs during that cold snap were able to run their cars in their garages with the heaters on and keep the occupants alive without CO poisoning... One of my fellow Bolt owners there actually ran the car for two weeks in the garage and only used up 2/3rds of their battery charge.
Another reason why the new 2022 F150 lightning seems like a good buy, it has ability to do plug into the home powering up to 9.6Kw, that means you could run a moderatedly size house off the truck battery as a powerwall that's hella cool. I never seen another EV able to do this, id love the ability to use my Fiat's 24Kw battery in a emergency to power my home in a power outage.
 

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That's the Republican legislature that made sure that, even though 10 years ago that exact scenario was brought up as a potential problem by them, they did nothing about it. AND Texas had made sure they were not grid-tied to the rest of the US, so were unable to even import electricity. Has zero to do with EVs. Gas cars were unable to get gas then, either. What happened in Texas is highly unlikely in teh rest of the nation. But with the Texas legislature, probably no lessons were actually learned.

BTW, people in Texas with EVs during that cold snap were able to run their cars in their garages with the heaters on and keep the occupants alive without CO poisoning... One of my fellow Bolt owners there actually ran the car for two weeks in the garage and only used up 2/3rds of their battery charge.
I know it has zero to do with EV's in particular but just imagine how much more strained it'd be if all of a sudden 1 million more EV were suddenly driving in TX with its already crumbling infrastructure is what I'm saying. Some areas are simply not ready yet for massive EV adoption.
 

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I know it has zero to do with EV's in particular but just imagine how much more strained it'd be if all of a sudden 1 million more EV were suddenly driving
This constantly comes up and it ignores the basic fact that it literally can't happen. Even if all manufacturers switched to making only EVs overnight, it'd take 30 years to make enough EVs to replace even MOST of the gas car/truck fleet in the US alone. Since there is still a gradual changeover from gas to electrified cars and trucks, there'll be MORE than enough time for the grid to be ready, even in backwards Texas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
BTW, people in Texas with EVs during that cold snap were able to run their cars in their garages with the heaters on and keep the occupants alive without CO poisoning... One of my fellow Bolt owners there actually ran the car for two weeks in the garage and only used up 2/3rds of their battery charge.
I think there was a Tesla driver in Austin that was charged $9,000 for charging his model S...have you hear about this?
 

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This constantly comes up and it ignores the basic fact that it literally can't happen. Even if all manufacturers switched to making only EVs overnight, it'd take 30 years to make enough EVs to replace even MOST of the gas car/truck fleet in the US alone. Since there is still a gradual changeover from gas to electrified cars and trucks, there'll be MORE than enough time for the grid to be ready, even in backwards Texas.
Home charging is one thing in a low loaded grid late night but when mass adoption happens im thinking how the infrusturcure can handle thousands of 250-350Kw chargers everywhere that's like 1 car eating up 15 cars worth of juice in one go for 30-40 mins at a time.
I think there was a Tesla driver in Austin that was charged $9,000 for charging his model S...have you hear about this?
there was another story about a non EV owner who had a $12k electric bill also it was on the news.
 

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I think there was a Tesla driver in Austin that was charged $9,000 for charging his model S...have you hear about this?
yeah, after the electricity came back there were a lot of electric customers that got charged silly amounts.


"ERCOT’s wholesale prices will occasionally spike to very high levels, and customers who get their power through market-based contracts have to pay those high prices. But price spikes don’t normally last for very long - typically for a few hours and mostly during the summer. And they can have some benefit, since they give electric retailers opportunities to inform customers about the value of energy conservation.
That was how the Texas electricity market was supposed to work. It was not designed for the severe and sustained shortages that arrived with the cold wave."
 

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Home charging is one thing in a low loaded grid late night but when mass adoption happens im thinking how the infrusturcure can handle thousands of 250-350Kw chargers everywhere that's like 1 car eating up 15 cars worth of juice in one go for 30-40 mins at a time.
Again, mass adoption literally can't happen suddenly or overnight. It's physically impossible. So bringing it up is a red herring and needs to stop.
 

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I think there was a Tesla driver in Austin that was charged $9,000 for charging his model S...have you hear about this?
It was for the hotel room, it didn't even have heat I'm told.

That was my relative, he couldn't charge as all the charging stations were down, and he didn't top off his electron tank before the storm. Tesla chose not to bring their battery operated charging stations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
It was for the hotel room, it didn't even have heat I'm told.

That was my relative, he couldn't charge as all the charging stations were down, and he didn't top off his electron tank before the storm. Tesla chose not to bring their battery operated charging stations.
:oops: Yikes! Sorry about that.
 

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:oops: Yikes! Sorry about that.

Yeah, it's just one of those chest hair building moments. But most BEV owners here (usually ex-tdi freaks) call shenanigans, there will always be power. In fact, they can probably produce electricity from hummingbirds while driving.
 

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Fun indeed, i commute daily in my 2017 500e, driving round trip of 74 miles each day it suits my needs perfectly. Ive put 20k miles so far on mine no issues whatsoever.
Ok tell me more. I have a Kona EV and want to pickup a second one for an around town commuter. Looks like I can pick up a 500e for like 10k cheaper than an eGolf.
 
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