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2009 BMW 328i, 2017 Acura MDX
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You may think you know footwork, but you will never be Ayrton Senna in leather loafers driving an NSX-R on a track:

I’ve never watched that video that closely, he’s got sort of a weird driving style where he feathers the throttle in the turns, I guess he’s playing with the front-rear traction bias? Or maybe he’s just not 100% comfortable with a car that he hasn’t driven before.

Never seen that in other pedal box videos.
 

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I’ve never watched that video that closely, he’s got sort of a weird driving style where he feathers the throttle in the turns, I guess he’s playing with the front-rear traction bias? Or maybe he’s just not 100% comfortable with a car that he hasn’t driven before.

Never seen that in other pedal box videos.
He's trying to get the front to bite-in and the rear to over-steer a little.
 

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1999 MKIII GOLF Mi, 2018 Sentra Nismo
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I’ve never watched that video that closely, he’s got sort of a weird driving style where he feathers the throttle in the turns, I guess he’s playing with the front-rear traction bias? Or maybe he’s just not 100% comfortable with a car that he hasn’t driven before.

Never seen that in other pedal box videos.
it's some sort of built in traction control, you can tell he is going for the slide for the turn in, but also keeping the rear tires planted while exiting the turn, just a magician.

That Walter Rohrl video is off the chains that whole documentary is very interesting.

Wasn't that Z from some one on this forum? I remember a few months (maybe a year) a thread about a guy rebuilding a z that had that paint job?
 

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A chili pepper and an empty crate.
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I’ve never watched that video that closely, he’s got sort of a weird driving style where he feathers the throttle in the turns, I guess he’s playing with the front-rear traction bias? Or maybe he’s just not 100% comfortable with a car that he hasn’t driven before.

Never seen that in other pedal box videos.
Oh that's definitely his style. He's not the only one that does it like that in real life but it's pretty rare. There's various theories on it, from a way he adapted to a particular kart early in life, to a method for getting the car pointed early (i.e., oversteer on entry and not on exit), to a way to consistently probe rear axle traction.

As a practical matter, it's not that different from pulse width modulation, a way that engineers make something that is in actuality an on/off switch act like it's a continuous volume knob. Even in the era with actual throttle cables, the engine still needs some time to pump more air, the tires need time to transmit the torque, the suspension needs time to load, etc. He's stabbing pretty quick, and all those things muddy it. My own theory is that it's just a quirky personal way to hold different part-throttle positions.

We'll never really know, and I'll guess there's a decent chance he didn't fully understand it either. It flies in the face of most driving theory, but there's no doubt he made it work.
 

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2009 BMW 328i, 2017 Acura MDX
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Oh that's definitely his style. He's not the only one that does it like that in real life but it's pretty rare. There's various theories on it, from a way he adapted to a particular kart early in life, to a method for getting the car pointed early (i.e., oversteer on entry and not on exit), to a way to consistently probe rear axle traction.

As a practical matter, it's not that different from pulse width modulation, a way that engineers make something that is in actuality an on/off switch act like it's a continuous volume knob. Even in the era with actual throttle cables, the engine still needs some time to pump more air, the tires need time to transmit the torque, the suspension needs time to load, etc. He's stabbing pretty quick, and all those things muddy it. My own theory is that it's just a quirky personal way to hold different part-throttle positions.

We'll never really know, and I'll guess there's a decent chance he didn't fully understand it either. It flies in the face of most driving theory, but there's no doubt he made it work.
Yeah, it does seem a little wonky because I’ve always been told to be smooth on the throttle, roll on, etc.

Now that I think about it though, I have heard of certain cars that don’t do well with part throttle. It does seem possible that Senna adopted that driving style because the fueling of old race cars just wasn’t as good as cars now.

It’s definitely interesting to watch though. And if I wasn’t Senna I’d be cringing. Hell I was cringing and that video IS Senna.
 
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