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It depends on the tools you have available on hand. The bestway is to take them off the car. Wet sand them down and use a Porter Cable random orbital with foam pads and compund and polish to remove the sanding marks. Then you need to seal them with something to prootect from UV light. It helps to maintain the when you wash the ca isomthing like Plexus as well.
There should be a DIY in the MKIV section. Or check out autopia.org

Most of the over the counter kits that work with a drill will do a pretty good job. If you don't have the above mentioned tools. You can try the Meguires Heavy Duty kit from advanced Auto.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It depends on the tools you have available on hand. The bestway is to take them off the car. Wet sand them down and use a Porter Cable random orbital with foam pads and compund and polish to remove the sanding marks. Then you need to seal them with something to prootect from UV light. It helps to maintain the when you wash the ca isomthing like Plexus as well.
There should be a DIY in the MKIV section. Or check out autopia.org

Most of the over the counter kits that work with a drill will do a pretty good job. If you don't have the above mentioned tools. You can try the Meguires Heavy Duty kit from advanced Auto.
Thanks
 

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I used to use 3 kind of sand paper then some rubbing compound and plastx to bring it all back. It takes a lot of elbow grease per light, but comes out great. Unfortunately the hazing does come back, unless you throw some clear on it.

I've been going the glass route since. Replace them once, take care of them and they'll last forever.

I'm not a big believer in those kits, because I know the work it takes to get clean, and they just wipe the lens to perfection. haha :screwy:
 

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i've heard the 3M kit works pretty well. Comes with two or three sanding discs and a polish/protectent I believe. I think its like $30 at an autozone.
Yea thats similiar to what I put together. Im talking about the ones on TV that claim to just wipe away.. I wish I still had the link to DIY I used it was really good. I'll see if I can find it.
 

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I did the same thing as VRptstyly and used three kinds of sand paper, wet sanded the headlights, then rubbing compound and then plasti-x polish. Came out fantastic, did this two years ago, the hazing does come back but if you put on plasti-x once every 6 month period it should be all good. :thumbup:

or.

you could always use toothpaste :rolleyes:

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I did the same thing as VRptstyly and used three kinds of sand paper, wet sanded the headlights, then rubbing compound and then plasti-x polish. Came out fantastic, did this two years ago, the hazing does come back but if you put on plasti-x once every 6 month period it should be all good. :thumbup:

or.

you could always use toothpaste :rolleyes:

I'm going to try this the I'd post a feedback whether it works or not
 

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It depends on the tools you have available on hand. The bestway is to take them off the car. Wet sand them down and use a Porter Cable random orbital with foam pads and compund and polish to remove the sanding marks. Then you need to seal them with something to prootect from UV light. It helps to maintain the when you wash the ca isomthing like Plexus as well.
There should be a DIY in the MKIV section. Or check out autopia.org

Most of the over the counter kits that work with a drill will do a pretty good job. If you don't have the above mentioned tools. You can try the Meguires Heavy Duty kit from advanced Auto.
I just did this for a friend's VR6 GTI. Might as well post the pics of before and after if you don't go with a glass lenses.

Tools/Products used:

3M headlight restoration kit
Porter Cable 7424 XP with a 3" backing plate.
Meguiar's #105 & #205 polishes
Mother's Plastic Polish
Duragloss # 105 to seal the lights since there isn't any clear coat anymore.

Driver's side light finished - Duragloss #105 is on the headlight in this shot. Passenger side has not been resurfaced yet.


Headlights finished and sealed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I just did this for a friend's VR6 GTI. Might as well post the pics of before and after if you don't go with a glass lenses.

Tools/Products used:

3M headlight restoration kit
Porter Cable 7424 XP with a 3" backing plate.
Meguiar's #105 & #205 polishes
Mother's Plastic Polish
Duragloss # 105 to seal the lights since there isn't any clear coat anymore.

Driver's side light finished - Duragloss #105 is on the headlight in this shot. Passenger side has not been resurfaced yet.


Headlights finished and sealed.
I have done this before and it works. Just want a quicker way because of laziness.:)
 

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I'd recommend the glass lens route as well. I used one of the plastic refinishing kits, took a fair amount of time and work to get pretty good results. Six months later they looked nearly as bad again.

I bought glass lenses. Install was fairly easy, didn't take any more time and was less aggravating than the polishing method. And the results were way better. Today they look the same as they did when I installed them well over a year ago. ;)
 

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Consumer Reports Says.

http://news.consumerreports.org/car...ht-lens-cleaning-kits-that-restore-shine.html


Shine up your hazy headlights
Consumer Reports magazine: March 2012

As people keep their cars longer, oxidation of commonly used plastic headlight lenses is an increasing problem for drivers. Oxidation creates a haze that can significantly reduce headlight illumination, creating a safety hazard. And because hazing occurs over time, you might not notice the creeping danger.

Replacing the lenses or having them professionally cleaned are options but can cost $200. For a fraction of that, you can use a headlight lens cleaning kit.

We recently sampled four kits, all costing $21 or less, on several older cars: 3M Headlight Lens Restoration System 29008, Fast Brite Auto Headlight Restorer Kit, Sylvania Headlight Restoration Kit, and Turtle Wax Headlight Lens Restorer. All the kits remove the cloudy surface of plastic lenses by using abrasives. Three then polish the lenses back to a smoother finish, while a fourth skips directly to the sealant stage to finish the lens. Two other kits also use a sealant. All can be purchased either online or at auto parts and department stores.

In our test:
3M Headlight Lens Restoration System 29008 ($15)
Fast Brite Auto Headlight Restorer Kit ($17)
Sylvania Headlight Restoration Kit ($21)
Turtle Wax Headlight Lens Restorer ($9)

Most kits involve several steps for cleaning, and can take as much as an hour for both lenses. One kit, the 3M Headlight Lens Restoration System, also requires the use of an electric drill and sanding discs—a slip-up could result in scratched paint.

Using cars with clouded headlights belonging to CR staff volunteers, we evaluated products for their effectiveness and ease of use. We measured the change in light transmission with a light meter before and after working on them in one of our labs, using controlled room lighting. Mounted on a stand, the light meter was positioned in the brightest part of the light beam, and left in the same position for the ‘after-cleaning’ measurement. After returning the cars to their owners, we brought them back into the lab eight weeks later to re-check the light transmission and see how the products held up over time.

The results varied, but we found that even the poorest performer in our group can dramatically improve light output on badly weathered lenses. It is clear that you have to do a thorough job, though, for the best results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I'd recommend the glass lens route as well. I used one of the plastic refinishing kits, took a fair amount of time and work to get pretty good results. Six months later they looked nearly as bad again.

I bought glass lenses. Install was fairly easy, didn't take any more time and was less aggravating than the polishing method. And the results were way better. Today they look the same as they did when I installed them well over a year ago. ;)
Is it a do it yourself install or I have to take it to a body shop to have the glass installed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'd recommend the glass lens route as well. I used one of the plastic refinishing kits, took a fair amount of time and work to get pretty good results. Six months later they looked nearly as bad again.

I bought glass lenses. Install was fairly easy, didn't take any more time and was less aggravating than the polishing method. And the results were way better. Today they look the same as they did when I installed them well over a year ago. ;)
Any pix?
 

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Is it a do it yourself install or I have to take it to a body shop to have the glass installed?
Pretty simple diy. I had never even pulled my front bumper cover off before but I found a diy thread on here somewhere and it was pretty simple with very basic handtools. Once you get the headlamps out, bake them in a 200 degree oven for 5 minutes to soften the sealant and pry the old lenses off with a screwdiver (after removing the clips, of course). Run a bead of new sealant, make sure the inside of the new lenses are spotless as well as the housing itself being dust free, and reverse the process.

Just see any pic of any R on here with brand new headlights. Mine don't look any different, just perpetually crystal clear.
 
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