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Man, thank you so much for this. I was beginning to think I was going crazy with this DSG... Going to give it another go tomorrow.
 

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:thumbup: Awesome write up! thanks
 

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This thread was extremely helpful to me before I got the APR DGS tune. The tune completely changed the driving dynamics of the car and voids out 90% of the DSG confusion and hiccups.
 

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Incidentally, I believe (my opinion) this is actually a "Feature" - a designed behavior for a DSG, not a bug or unintended effect. Common sense would suggest that if you were stopped at a light, it would be ridiculous for the DSG to be applying partial clutch pressure in the event you might want instant GO - just imagine the excess wear on the expensive clutch packs that would cause. The DSG instead monitors the brakes, and while you are stopped and the brakes on, the clutches have no need to be engaged (No need to cause all that wear). The delay you witness when stomping on the gas from a stopped brake position is likely just the sum of the time it takes for your brakes to release and the clutch to engage, so my guess is there really isn't much you can do to get rid of this designed behavior, just anticipate and work around it using the above tip. My 2 cents!
First of all, thanks for your write-up, very interesting.

My personal experience is slightly different from what you are describing for the portion of waiting at a red light.
It appears to me that while sitting still in D, S or manual mode, the clutches are still partly engaged because the creep is immediate (unless pointing uphill).
Also, if you look in the MFD, the immediate fuel consumption (in my 2014 TDI) in neutral is 0.7 litres / hour while in D, S or manual, it's 0.9 (that's pretty wasteful if you ask me.. 25% more fuel for nothing).
Clearly, something is working harder unless you put the DSG in neutral.

I read somewhere (can't remember where) that in Europe, the DSG completely disengages (IE puts itself in neutral) after a short delay while standstill and reengages as soon as you release the brake pedal (which makes total sense to me... similar to a stop-start system on some cars). I guess North American driving habits (or the fear from VW corporate of some stupid lawsuit) made them change the coding in the DSG?

What's your opinion on that?
Anyone heard something about the European DSG? Anyway to reprogram ours to behave like that?
 

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The brake is the clutch...

Do you have any tips and tricks? Think these are Crap? Lets hear from you.
No, I don't think this thread is complete crap!

I arrived here because soon after we acquired a new Skoda Roomster with the 1.2TSI engine and the 7 speed DQ200 DSG for my wife, it became obvious that whilst you can attempt to drive the DSG like a slush box, and it will work, more or less, it clearly isn't one and there are certain habits that people who drive slush-autos have that are really not good for the DSG at all. So I have been trying to figure out the best way to use (and look after) the DSG box.

The one thing the manual does tell us, or at least ours does, is NOT to hold the car on the accelerator on a hill. Now I guess a lot of auto drivers will use the creep, and a bit of gas if necessary, for this and may well carry this habit to the DSG. Especially once they find that it overcomes the launch lag!

However the reason it's bad is obvious - the clutch is slipping all the time that this is happening, unlike the slush box which would just be churning fluid.

What the manual doesn't tell you explicitly is that holding on the brake disengages the clutch. This also explains the lag, because when you release the brake pedal the clutch comes to the bite point. Some power will then allow the clutch to engage fully as the car starts to move. This also means that, as already noted above, anticipating the brake release slightly will mean that when the time to launch comes the clutch is ready and off you go.

The other thing that the manual doesn't tell you in so many words is that only the footbrake has this clutch-releasing function. If you leave the car in gear, but hold it on the handbrake, the clutch is again at the bite point and slipping. Hence the value of hill hold control - when the foot is on the brake, the clutch is disengaged, release the brake pedal and the brakes stay on for up to two seconds but will gradually release as the accelerator is pressed.

This applies whether using auto or sequential - I'm pretty sure this is how it works on our car, with it's manual parking brake, but can't be sure if it also applies to cars with an automatic parking brake.

Sorry if this is blindingly obvious already - it's certainly consistent with what others have said above, but was not explained clearly in the manual.

Incidentally - the reason that the DQ200 has so little oil is that it is only in the gearbox proper - the clutches are (a) single plate, and (b) completely dry and not in any sort of oil bath. So they do need to be looked after, as you would a 'proper' clutch!
 

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Great thread, lot of help sorting out my DSG...a couple of questions:

1. If I'm in 'D', and switch over to M, is the gear 'accurate'? Meaning, one time I went to M and it was in 4th, at 2200RPM, 32mph, up a grade...this just seems like a really tall gear to be in for that circumstance - or perhaps I'm just not accustomed the GTI's torque curve?

2. When entering/exiting a corner, when have you found to be the best time to downshift to accelerate out? I think I read somewhere else that the DSG will rev match for you...

3. How many of you use 1 from a complete stop? It seems that even under moderate to light acceleration, I'm at 4K very fast and am quickly upshifting. Do you just start from 2 unless on an uphill grade?
 

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Great thread, lot of help sorting out my DSG...a couple of questions:

1. If I'm in 'D', and switch over to M, is the gear 'accurate'? Meaning, one time I went to M and it was in 4th, at 2200RPM, 32mph, up a grade...this just seems like a really tall gear to be in for that circumstance - or perhaps I'm just not accustomed the GTI's torque curve?

2. When entering/exiting a corner, when have you found to be the best time to downshift to accelerate out? I think I read somewhere else that the DSG will rev match for you...

3. How many of you use 1 from a complete stop? It seems that even under moderate to light acceleration, I'm at 4K very fast and am quickly upshifting. Do you just start from 2 unless on an uphill grade?
1. The gear is accurate. The turbo is at full spool and the engine generating peak torque at about 2000 RPM, so you can accelerate in pretty much any gear as long as you're over 2k.

2. Do your downshifting before the curve. It's a front wheel drive car and the weight shift mid-corner from the change in acceleration during a shift could upset the handling.

3. The DSG won't let you start in anything above 1st gear. My thought is that this is done to limit clutch slipping and excessive heat generation, but I don't have any documentation to back that up.
 

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Thank you for this thread! I bought my GLi just 2 weeks ago now, and I've been teaching myself the little nuances between driving clutched manuals and cpu controlled ones. It's been fun, but I still had some of the old habits which I didn't realize were hurting me until this thread. :beer:

Time to go for a drive....for science :)

Kei
 

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wow great tips! I've always been a manual guy, this is going to be my first DSG and I felt the lag when I was test driving the A3-2015 1.8 that uses a DSG, do these tips and tricks applies also to my car? A3 1.8 tfsi?

thanks
 

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Yup, the dual clutch cars drive very nicely once you learn how to drive them.

Kei
 

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I've followed the advice here and have been trying for months to get to a smooth stop on a '12 TDI Jetta. I've done it maybe once. Does the above still apply to the diesels? I've gotten to the point where I just let the dsg automatically downshift from 2nd to 1st
 
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