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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Disclaimer:
In NO WAY am I trying to advertise this company or product. I do not list full hyperlinks to the product for advertisement or to direct sales, only my feedback to help people decide if they feel they would benefit from what I have installed in my own car.


I’ve put a lot of time and effort into carefully planning out my suspension upgrades. I went so far as to setup a Suspension Options for an Awesome Daily Driver or Track Car thread to get a collection of input. After my step by step suspension improvements from my Driver Gear lowering springs, TyrolSport DeadSet Rigid Front Subframe Collar Kit, HPA Red 75 durometer core interlock lower motor mount (pendulum mount), Peloquin LSD, Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires and TyrolSport DeadSet Rigid Rear Subframe Collar Kit (in order), I wanted to explore the world of lower control arm bushings to gain incremental traction for my APR K04 power levels. The final step for my suspension build will either be a strut/shock upgrade to pair with my current Driver Gear lowering springs or a full coilover replacement.

Options For Lower Control Arm Rear Bushings:
I came across three main options on the market today, the SuperPro Control Arm Lower-Inner Rear Anti Lift bushings (polyurethane blend), the OEM Audi TT Lower-Inner Rear bushings (rubber) and then the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) (polyurethane blend). The SuperPro bushings can be pressed into the OEM housings and provide 0.5 degree static positive caster to both front wheels through the offset hole design (not in the center of the bushing like OEM or Whiteline). The OEM Audi TT bushings are solid cab rubber bushing replacements which offer no change in caster but can firm up the front end response. The Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) is a full all-in-one housing replacement with upgraded bushing and provides 0.5 degree static positive caster to both front wheels through changes to the housing and mounting points. I’m not 100% educated on the polyurethane blends or absolute material used in the SuperPro bushings or the Whiteline bushings.

Choosing Lower Control Arm Rear Bushings:
Initially, I put my consideration for the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) on the backburner due some posts about the deterioration of the inner bushing after track use (see Steelcurtain’s example). For a while I researched the OEM route and spoke with ECS Tuning who offered the S3 or Audi TT rubber bushings already pressed into the OEM aluminum housings. Basically, the bushings could only be purchased already pressed inside new OEM aluminum housings which drove the price up for the OEM Audi TT rubber bushings. While researching ways to buy just the Audi TT rubber bushings without the aluminum housings, I found a company in the UK which sells just the bushings and will ship to the US for 37.10 GBP, which based on today’s US conversion rate, comes out to about $61. While waiting for the OEM Audi TT rubber bushings to arrive I continued to research feedback on the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK), specifically from MK6 owners. After thoroughly comparing positive and negative feedback I drew the conclusion that the AWD MK5 R32 owners seemed to have the most inner bushing deterioration when compared to FWD MK6 GTI owners. After contacting Whiteline and providing forum examples of the inner bushing deterioration, they assured me that their bushing composition would not deteriorate and offered a lifetime warranty on the bushings. After consulting several heavy hitter suspension guru’s on the MK5 and MK6 forums (Simmsled, The Bruce & U-20T), I opted to test the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) first. I knew that I would be diligent with continually checking the condition of the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) inner and outer bushings for any signs of deterioration. If deterioration occurred, I would either swap back to the OEM housings with OEM Audi TT rubber bushings or even look to press the OEM Audi TT rubber bushings into the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) housings.

Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) Description:
Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) is designed to add 0.5 deg static positive caster to both front wheels while changing the nature of front anti-dive & lift. The low compliance bush also maintain higher dynamic positive castor. By changing the front control arm geometry - the new alloy mounts coupled with the new low compliance synthetic elastomer bushings change front suspension attitude. This leads to superior traction under power including cornering & dramatically reducing understeer & front wheel spin. The additional castor coupled with the new firmer bushings supplied serve to dramatically sharpen initial turn-in response then forcing more consistent alignment angles through the corner due to the reduced bush compliance.

Whiteline Explanation From Another Forum:
The KCA316 WALK actually increases +0.5 static caster not camber. Whiteline doesn’t believe in increasing static camber unless absolutely necessary where as extra positive caster delivers a lot of real world performance benefits, not least of which is better turn in response and more dynamic negative camber on turns. We would estimate that actual improvements in dynamic caster would be in excess of +1.0 degree. The main aspect of the geometry change is actually the Anti-lift component and the related outcomes. Our experience has shown that we can significantly reduce under steer and corner exit speed by reducing the stock amount of front anti-lift and this is responsible for most of the other positives felt in the driving.

Q: Should I try adjusting caster or camber first to improve handling?
A: Caster, and here's why:
1. Camber doesn't improve turn-in, positive caster does.
2. Camber is not good for tire wear.
3. Camber doesn't improve directional stability.
4. Camber adversely effects braking and acceleration.

Q: Is there such a thing as too much caster?
A: No, and here's why:
1. Maximize tire contact patch during roll.
2. Improve turn-in response.
3. Increase directional stability.
4. Maximize tire contact patch during braking and acceleration.
5. Improved steering feel and self-center increases dynamic negative camber (on turn).


Some Great Technical Explanations For Consideration:
MotoIQ Project MKVI Golf TDI: Introduction and Suspension Upgrades
WALK Your MK5
Discussion Paper: Effect of Whiteline Anti-Lift Kit (ALK)
Whiteline Alignment Settings

Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) Unboxing:
The package comes with the new anodized housings, polyurethane blend bushings already pressed into place, the inner bushings and a packet of grease.
To my surprise the bushings felt softer than I expected which made me feel better about possible NVH or road harshness.






WALK bushing vs. Audi TT bushing:




Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) Installation:
Installation is pretty straight forward. Put the car up on the lift to access the bolts for the rear control arm housings. Remove the rear housing bolts then remove the front control arm bolt to drop the control arm. Clean and grease the rear control arm shaft, slip the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) inner bushing over the control arm shaft, grease the outside of the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) inner bushing, slip the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) housing over the inner bushing, re-align the front control arm bolt, thread the rear housing bolts into place and tighten all bolts to factory specs.















TyrolSport Subframe Collar:
When this kit was first installed I had the standard TyrolSport DeadSet Front Subframe Collar Kit installed on the car which works with the OEM rear control arm housing. At that time we shaved down one side of the collar to fit with the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) housing.










WALK Gen 2 Collar Kit:
Two months after installation I sourced the TyrolSport DeadSet Front Subframe Collar Upgrade Kit for the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) which consists of two bottom bushings for either the Gen 1 or Gen 2 version of the Whiteline Anti Lift Kits (WALK). The Gen 1 housings does not have a recessed bolt hole, the Gen 2 housings do. At the time of installing this TyrolSport upgrade kit, we verified that the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) inner bushings still looked brand new with no signs of deterioration.


Alignment:
With the TyrolSport DeadSet Front Subframe Collar Kit, the only front alignment adjustment needed after installing the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) was toe.


Overall Results and Recommendations:
I’m personally looking for the “awesome daily driver”, striking a fine balance between a baby daycare shuttle during the week, spirited mountain warrior on the weekends and then an occasional HPDE Green Group track car. I'm trying to increase some stiffness, correct or improve suspension geometry, improve traction, and realize better overall response from driver input while limiting NVH, rattles and feeling beat up from long drives.

After rolling off the lift, I drove around the parking lot to test for NVH and any feedback. The car felt smooth as usual with no increase in NVH and no noticeable effects. When I got on the highway I barreled through some on ramps, U-turns and windy roads to get a feel for the changes from input to response. The steering wheel response improved significantly making the front end feeling much more nimble, similar to when you switch to lighter wheels. Also, throughout the turns the steering wheel felt positively heavier which I liked. I felt like I get more weight of the steering wheel when laying into turns.

For this review I really wanted to refrain from posting until I had some longer term testing. I have had this kit installed on my car for over 3 months. I’ve tested this kit through pothole-infested daily driving and weekend bashings through the mountains. With 19” wheels, Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires and the other upgrades listed above I can honestly state that NVH and road harshness is minimal to none. This was my first attempt at replacing suspension bushings and while I didn’t yet test the OEM Audi TT rubber bushings I’m in love with this setup and my choice to run the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK). Now, only time will tell how they hold up but again, I knew that I would be diligent with continually checking the condition of the bushings for any signs of deterioration. If deterioration occurs, I would either swap back to the OEM housings with OEM Audi TT rubber bushings or even look to press the OEM Audi TT rubber bushings into the Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) housings. Some say this could be the best of both worlds, rubber bushings with the added caster. I plan on attending one HPDE event this year and will make sure to circle back with feedback after a spot check of Whiteline Anti Lift Kit (WALK) inner bushing.
 

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Great review and DIY!! Going for these as well in the future!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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Great write up! What was your caster before? I lowered my r20, not slammed but got took out wheel gap, and was running -7• caster... I raised the front end about 3/4 of an inch since it was checked but am hoping i brought my caster up at least .2 to get it out of the negatives for this kit. In the end handling comes first but the look is there... Cheers


Max
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I made this for you guys, this could be a great supplemental guide for those that are rebuilding their subframes with the TyrolSport deadset kits or even when replacing OEM bolts. They can now determine which new OEM bolts to get and torque specs.

 

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help can't win

I made this for you guys, this could be a great supplemental guide for those that are rebuilding their subframes with the TyrolSport deadset kits or even when replacing OEM bolts. They can now determine which new OEM bolts to get and torque specs.

I have just labored to repair some curb damage to the front of 2005.5 Jetta. There was enough damage to the left front to justify freshening the right front as well, so I did a few upgrades while I was there.
1. Added new struts.
2. Added new VW Wolfsburg springs.
3. Added powerline front control arm bushings and the whiteline WALK.
4. And finally a tyrolsport deadset kit.

I took it in to get it aligned today and the tech stripped the bolt you list as #2 in your picture. I can't tear into it with this next storm breathing down my neck, but I know I had better get the parts ordered up.
Does that bolt thread into a nut plate or will I have to go through another round of pain getting those threads fixed.
 

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im doing the control arm and bracket poly inserts.. are those torque specs listed the same for the passat b6 2006 2.0t? also, are they the same bolts as in same part numbers? my dealer had no clue which ones i needed.

I made this for you guys, this could be a great supplemental guide for those that are rebuilding their subframes with the TyrolSport deadset kits or even when replacing OEM bolts. They can now determine which new OEM bolts to get and torque specs.

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
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