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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I bought these Water traps from Airlift and it says on them only good for 150 psi... I want to run 175 psi. My tank is rated for 200 psi so I thought just incase later on i want to run 200 psi I should be purchasing 200 psi capable air traps. The ones I Got are SMC water traps.
I am running dual compressors and wondering and wondering if I should be running 3 Air traps two into the tank and 1 out of the tank or just two into the tank.

Thanks for the help.
 

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You are going to have to get a 250 psi unit. Mine was pricey. Made by Parker. My setup is similar to what you're doing. Running 200 in a small tank to make up for the lack of air volume in that small tank.

SMC probably makes one too. They're expensive because that pressure is too high for cheaper materials the 150 psi units can be made out of. Look on ebay or just google for it. Most retail pneumatic and hydraulic hose and fitting shops have them.

Also don' forget the push to connect (ptc) to either 1/4" or 3/8 NPT adapters.

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Any particular reason for wanting to run at 175 or 200psig?

I literally love it every time somebody says that they are running 200psig max tank pressure so that they can downsize their tank and still have the same amount of air to play with. Yeah one of my favorites :laugh:

Run one trap between the tank and the manifold. What you are trying to protect is the manifold, you shouldn't care what amount of water is getting into the tank as long as you are efficient at emptying the tank during the winter months. But again if you have your mind set of a different configuration please go ahead and do what you please :thumbup: :laugh:
 

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Any particular reason for wanting to run at 175 or 200psig?

I literally love it every time somebody says that they are running 200psig max tank pressure so that they can downsize their tank and still have the same amount of air to play with. Yeah one of my favorites :laugh:

Run one trap between the tank and the manifold. What you are trying to protect is the manifold, you shouldn't care what amount of water is getting into the tank as long as you are efficient at emptying the tank during the winter months. But again if you have your mind set of a different configuration please go ahead and do what you please :thumbup: :laugh:
Well explain the humor. Please enlighten me. What are we missing that you know. Instead of ridicule, how about educating us.


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Actually... I was going to run it at 175 I don't know if the smc air trap will work at 175 for a 150 rated. I am running a 5 gallon tank and am pretty sure that's enough air I just want something over rated instead of under rated. I pretty much thought 175 was the normal air pressure you would want to run in the system as well as everything else is rated for 200 psi.
 

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Actually... I was going to run it at 175 I don't know if the smc air trap will work at 175 for a 150 rated. I am running a 5 gallon tank and am pretty sure that's enough air I just want something over rated instead of under rated. I pretty much thought 175 was the normal air pressure you would want to run in the system as well as everything else is rated for 200 psi.
150 psi traps are usually polycarbonate. It will shatter or the bowl can launch.


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Well explain the humor. Please enlighten me. What are we missing that you know. Instead of ridicule, how about educating us.
You still have the same volume of air if your low-high setpoints are 110-145 or whether they are 140-175. There is still 35psig differential of air worth in the tank, which works out to be the same amount of standard cubic feet no matter what the pressure comparison. If you use the ideal gas law (pretty basic PV=nRT) you can easily find this out or do your own calculations, i have done them many times in the past for people.

There are 2 things which will increase your "playing" capacity of air that you have:
1) If you have a larger reservoir/tank
2) If you adjust your high and low set points to be further away from each other which is only available with Airlift i believe and not Accuair setups

I would not recommend going with number 2 unless you really have the compressors to match the total airflow and duty requirements. You can put a lot more undue stress/strain on the compressors by having them operate for a long time or to a higher pressure than typical.

150 psi traps are usually polycarbonate. It will shatter or the bowl can launch.
Polycarbonate is an industrial standard for airline equipment, the typical that is stocked by airride suppliers have metallic bowls, usually aluminum. The o-rings will unseat before any bowls start shattering and you will get leaking problems.

OP, i would recommend not running the full 200psig just as a friendly recommendation. There is no need for a reservoir to have that much air unless you want to replace your compressors more often or you want that extra fraction of a fraction of a second faster lift speed.



And as for you original question, check out Ackland Grainger for these products!
3/8" Version: https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-250-psi-Compact-Compressed-4ZL29
1/4" Version: https://www.grainger.com/product/SPEEDAIRE-250-psi-Compact-Compressed-4ZL27
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the help. I was wondering if a lot of people run those traps. I will post a pic of the water traps I have because I need a third one wanna make sure it's all good. I take it if the trap does break the manifold will maintain bag pressure? Also wondering if I should run a check valve in-between the water traps?
 

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Any particular reason for wanting to run at 175 or 200psig?

I literally love it every time somebody says that they are running 200psig max tank pressure so that they can downsize their tank and still have the same amount of air to play with. Yeah one of my favorites :laugh:

Run one trap between the tank and the manifold. What you are trying to protect is the manifold, you shouldn't care what amount of water is getting into the tank as long as you are efficient at emptying the tank during the winter months. But again if you have your mind set of a different configuration please go ahead and do what you please 👍 :laugh:
Any particular reason for wanting to run at 175 or 200psig?

I literally love it every time somebody says that they are running 200psig max tank pressure so that they can downsize their tank and still have the same amount of air to play with. Yeah one of my favorites :laugh:

Run one trap between the tank and the manifold. What you are trying to protect is the manifold, you shouldn't care what amount of water is getting into the tank as long as you are efficient at emptying the tank during the winter months. But again if you have your mind set of a different configuration please go ahead and do what you please 👍 :laugh:
I run 200psi tank pressure on my 2016 Silverado because my ride height pressure is 145psi in the front. I can barely raise the front with it at 150psi. 200psi works perfect and fast.
 
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