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Re: Importing (OldSwabia)

Quote, originally posted by OldSwabia »
I think everyone here on VWVortex should pool money so we can get our on lobbyists in DC to repeal import laws.

Hi Swabia:
Well - I don't want to sound cynical, but I think that a lot of the motivation behind various import regulations is simply to protect domestic manufacturers. The United States is not the only country in the world that does this kind of thing. Try importing a motorcycle into Japan - it's impossible, even if the darn motorcycle was built in Japan to begin with!
As for raising money, we would have to raise more money than the domestic automakers raise if we wanted to have any success changing rules. In most democracies, the laws get made to satisfy the highest bidder. Such is life.

Michael
 

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Re: Importing (PanEuropean)

Let's remember that the United States does allow importation of automobiles that are certified to meet the emission, safety, etc., requirements into the country. And, as we know, many are imported! It would not make sense to make domestic and foreign manufacturers meet these standards and allow individuals to avoid them.
Regarding protectionism, never mind importing something as complex as a motorcycle to Japan, try importing apples! That's a Japanese market the U.S. has been trying to break into for many years with little success.
 

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Re: (poppy2)

Quote, originally posted by poppy2 »
Michael is absolutely correct . Canada is like any other country if it comes in to the country .....tax it !!! . Our Federal Sales Tax (GST) is 6% plus the Foreign Duty of 6.1% . .... then you licence it in Ontario there is the (PST) of 8% . But the above is true for any and all vehcles new or used imported or domestic . The real P/O is they put a $100 tax on AirConditioning !! .....can you beleive it !!

And I thought it was tough to bring a car from Texas to Kansas.
Although I would have gladly paid $100.00 for the AC.

Enjoy the car it's worth it.
Regards,
Brent
 

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Re: (PanEuropean)

Quote, originally posted by PanEuropean »

The hitch, though, is that the manufacturers have to spend a fortune to go through all the testing and certification of the car before they can attach that label to it, thus, unless you are willing to pay what would probably be a 7 figure number for the certification process, you won't get the label.

I think it's worse than that. Back in the 80s, Bill Gates bought a Porsche 959, a limited edition car which Porsche USA decided not to import. He wasn't able to get it certified to bring it into the US. And I'm sure that, to Bill Gates, a couple of million for certification costs wouldn't have been a big deal.
I heard that the trouble may have been that he needed to come up with a second 959 for US crash testing, and Porsche wouldn't sell him a second one for that purpose.
 

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Re: (W126C)

Quote, originally posted by W126C »
Although I would have gladly paid $100.00 for the AC.

Brent,
Don't forget you're only using it about two days a year up in Toronto, so it might not be that good a value at that point...
 

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I'm not so sure this is really true, for diesel vehicles. Prior to 2007 the US had no diesel regulations so pretty much any diesel is eligible from that era. There are other things to consider, as mentioned. There was a guy I know who wanted some very specific Ford Focus model only sold in Europe and he imported it to the US. Some weird diesel model It was a 2004IIRC and it was a brand new car he was importing. There was no certification that the vehicle met emissions but since it was diesel and the US had no diesel emissions regulations, the US had a form for emissions exempt (the same form I got when importing a Candian diesel Chevy K2500 to the US), The Focus also had no crash, safety or other certifications for the US for it, but the US does accept if you can show the car is essentially the same they allow the import and re-title in the US. He did have to change the brake fluid because europe uses some uncertified for US brake fluid, he had to re-aim the headlights officially EU had different std's for that, and IIRC there were some other minor things he had to do.

So it is possible at least for diesel vehicles, it's alot of work though. I remember thinking he was crazy, especially for a mundane vehicle like a Focus. I don't think US would allow any non-US sold gasoline engines however on the basis of emissions.

The good news is, once a vehicle is 25 years or older, all that goes away including federal emissions. So beginning 2027, those of us in the US can start importing Europeon 2002 Phaetons!
 

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Importing a Motor Vehicle | U.S. Customs and Border Protection (cbp.gov)


"Emission Standards
The following passenger cars, light-duty trucks, heavy-duty engines and motorcycles are subject to federal emission standards:

  • Gasoline-fueled cars and light-duty trucks originally manufactured after December 31, 1967.
  • Diesel-fueled cars originally manufactured after December 31, 1974.
  • Diesel-fueled light-duty trucks originally manufactured after December 31, 1975.
  • Heavy-duty engines originally manufactured after December 31, 1969.
  • Motorcycles with a displacement more than 49 cubic centimeters originally manufactured after December 31, 1977.
Vehicles must be certified to U.S. federal emission standards by their manufacturers for sale in the U.S. Vehicles that do not meet these requirements are considered nonconforming. A currently certified ICI, a list of which is available from the EPA, must import Nonconforming vehicles for you. The only EPA-authorized ICIs are located in the U.S. It is therefore recommended that you contact an ICI to discuss costs for modification and testing before you decide to import a nonconforming vehicle. The ICI will be responsible for assuring that your car complies with all U.S. emission requirements. (As of July 1, 1998, EPA no longer has the one-time exemption for vehicles five or more model-years old.) Be aware that EPA will deny entry to certain makers, models, and model year if an ICI is not certified or is unwilling to accept responsibility for the vehicle(s) in question."

My notes:

"ICI" stands for "Independent Commercial Importer".

Remember that Diesels were popular in Europe for decades. I think every Mercedes-Benz taxi I rode in on my TDY to Germany in 1978 was a diesel. Mercedes-Benz started exporting diesels to North America around the same time they started exporting their estate cars (station wagons).

Mercedes-Benz had a biodiesel back around WW2. It was one of the lower priced models (220D?) and towed its fuel converter behind it. The fuel converter/maker gadget looks like a still on a trailer. It's in my Mercedes-Benz book but I think that book is in storage and I can't find anything on it online. I don't think they called it "biodiesel" because I don't think that term was invented until Americans started burning used cooking oil in their cars.

American car makers like GM started building them in the late '70s or early '80s because of the gas shortage. Mercedes was ahead of the game. Soon GM dropped their diesel cars.

I speculate that the EPA decided to go medieval on diesel car imports when diesel cars started getting popular in the USA.
 

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Yeah, I ran into this Diesel is required for emission when importing a canadian chevy diesel truck, but when you contact the manufactuer for emissions cert, they hand you a this vehicle is exempt from emissions that CBP accepts. The explanation I got was, it's regulated along with all others since the 70's, but then no standards were put in place under that regulation until 2007, since it's regulated you need the cert from the manufacturer or independant testig from an ICI as you say, in my case I contacted GM and the cert they gave me was "this vehicle is exempt. "

On GM's diesel cars of the late 70's and 80's, they were horrible. GM took regular gasoline engines and slapped on high compression heads to turn them into diesels, with few mods to the block, so, most of those engines blew up on the owners.
 

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On GM's diesel cars of the late 70's and 80's, they were horrible. GM took regular gasoline engines and slapped on high compression heads to turn them into diesels, with few mods to the block, so, most of those engines blew up on the owners.
I actually watched a youtube video about that not so long ago. There's a Dutch guy who posts vids (narrated in English) about the US car industry. This was, I believe, featured in his three-part episode about the mailaise era.

Robert
 

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Interesting seems the older vehicle importation has two thresholds, one for emissions @21 years and one for safety @25 years. Under the show the vhicle is substantially the same clause for saftey, one could perhaps import a 21 year old 2002 phaeton next in 2023. 🤣
CBP said:
Generally, classic or antique vehicles are exempt from Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Transportation (DOT) pollution and safety requirements.
If the vehicle is at least 21 years old, there are no EPA compliance requirements upon importation.

A motor vehicle that is at least 25 years old can be lawfully imported into the U.S. without regard to whether it complies with all applicable DOT Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS).
 

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Interesting seems the older vehicle importation has two thresholds, one for emissions @21 years and one for safety @25 years. Under the show the vhicle is substantially the same clause for saftey, one could perhaps import a 21 year old 2002 phaeton next in 2023. 🤣
Yes that is unusual. It's two bureaucracies. Unfortunately, you need the FMVSS sticker. Without that sticker, it has to be the same. You need a note from the manufacturer stating that it is the same as the US version.

A Canadian car could probably pass but not all do.

ROW Phaetons probably wouldn't pass because they have to have door beams and safety glass in the windshield. They all have to have TPMS. If anything is not up to standards it has to be changed. That's when an ICI gets involved.

You can't even import a non-conforming salvage vehicle. If you want any cool ROW stuff, you have to buy it separately.

You could go to Germany or Europe and buy a Phaeton and ship everything but the shell back. I think you could even ship the engine back for offroad use only but I'd check on that.

In 2041 you can import any Phaeton. In 2029 you can import 2004 ROW Phaetons. That's only 7 years from now.
 
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