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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
https://www.bilstein.com/us/en/blog...-vw-golf-vii-passat-b8-and-related-platforms/

Have any of you upgraded your DCC to Bilstein B6 DampTronic shocks or Bilstein B16 DampTronic coilovers? If so what do you think? How do you like them?

I liked using the comfort mode for my son on the freeway or on bad roads, but when I had to do an evasive maneuver on the freeway there was a “dangerous” level of wallow/body roll. So I am now driving in a custom mode with everything Sport except Normal for DCC and only use comfort for short stretches of straight bad road. The Bilstein DampTronic still allows you to choose Comfort, Normal or Sport mode.

The B6 DampTronic is an improvement over the OEM Monroe shocks and are meant to be used with the stock springs. The B4 is Supposed to be an exact OEM spec replacement. The B16 is a full coil over setup where height can be adjusted as well as the stiffness through the DCC interface.

If you have either the Bilstein B6 or B16 DampTronic what is the body roll/wallow like on “Comfort” mode compared to stock DCC?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
bump

I’m leaning towards the B16 DampTronic Coilovers because it is a complete shock and spring pairing.

You guys might think this is funny but my son preferred the pairing of the non-adjustable suspension on my ‘17 GTI Sport compared to the DCC on my ‘19 GTI SE. Supposedly Monroe makes the adjustable shocks for the US DCC.

Does anyone know who makes the OEM Springs for the DCC system?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Why KW? What would be the advantages over the Bilstein setup?

Supposedly Porsche uses Bilstein on their adjustable PASM. Given the stock Porsche springs are different than the GTIs so B6 DampTronic would be different and the B16 DampTronic should offer a more planted ride compared to PASM. I once drove a Boxster with PASM and preferred that setup to the DCC.

My only experience with aftermarket suspension is with Bilstein and H&R. On my Corrado I first had H&R Race Springs with Bilstien Sport (for lowering springs) for a setup that out handled coilovers in the curves or on the track. I later swapped out the H&R Race Springs for H&R Sport springs for a more optimal street setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
For adjustable ride height, would your alignment technically be out at heights different to when it was set?
Whenever you add aftermarket shocks you need to have an alignment done. Yes at different heights the alignment would need to be redone. Balancing is not an issue with a lowered vehicle, but for alignments it would need to be taken to a shop that can align lowered vehicles...
 

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Cool, that's what I was thinking. I guess it's ideal for getting a very nice ride height for regular use that you can raise to get over obstacles and up driveways, and then return to normal.

I like the sound of that. I like lowered cars but sometimes practicality gets in the way.
 

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Just to make sure I have this clear in my head (and someone please correct me if I'm wrong) changing shocks does not affect ride height, correct? When you adjust the DCC settings no matter what brand of shocks you have you are only changing how quickly the piston in the shock can move up and/or down. It's slower (stiffer) in sport to prevent body roll and faster (softer) in comfort to absorb bumps. So just changing a set of shocks on their own shouldn't require an alignment because you aren't changing the ride height.

Springs affect ride height (thus lowering springs). Coilovers are shocks and springs together which is why they change ride height. I haven't used coilovers, but don't you have to get under the car with a wrench to turn a giant nut to raise and lower the car? So this isn't something you change on the fly, say to get over a speed bump. If you want to be able to change ride height on a moment's notice you need an air suspension, right?

https://productdeskapi.cart.bilsteinus.com/media/products/bilstein/47-251588_1.jpg
 

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You are mostly correct, but should get an alignment after changing shocks alone (even if your ride height doesn't change). For lack of a better description, there is some play in how your suspension parts go together. Your car's alignment is set by adjusting that play. An alignment is making adjustments in that play after which everything is torqued as necessary to keep it in place. This effectively eliminates the play between them, setting your alignment.

Changing shocks requires loosening and/or removing (then replacing) hardware which allows the adjustment/play between various suspension parts to change. Getting an alignment fixes this.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
 

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You will need an alignment after replacing front struts.

What tires are you running?

I’m running DG springs on the OEM DCC dampers (DCC equipped cars are +10mm higher than non DCC cars; DG springs correct this and are approved by VW for use with DCC dampers), and have no issues with body roll in Normal or Sport. I’m also running Michelin AS/3+ and have 12/15mm spacers F/R.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You will need an alignment after replacing front struts.

What tires are you running?

I’m running DG springs on the OEM DCC dampers (DCC equipped cars are +10mm higher than non DCC cars; DG springs correct this and are approved by VW for use with DCC dampers), and have no issues with body roll in Normal or Sport. I’m also running Michelin AS/3+ and have 12/15mm spacers F/R.
I took advantage of the 4th of July sales and ditched the stock Pirellis for Michelin Sport 4S because I’m going for a road trip along Big Sur and through the Redwoods (Hated the Pirellis). I would have gone with the German made Goodyear Eagle Asymmetric 3 like I had on my ‘17 GTI Sport, but Goodyear no longer makes our size.

The excessive unsafe body roll I experienced while doing a freeway speed defensive maneuver was in “Comfort”. I no longer use comfort and just use “Normal” or “Sport” and my son is fine with it, but still prefers the suspension setup on my previous ‘17 GTI.

It makes sense that the DCC springs are higher as they have to accommodate three different driving modes. From my experience back when I had a Corrado people lowered mostly for looks not handling. Back then putting in lowering springs while keeping OEM struts caused them to work harder. Sometimes they blew outright and failed.

I think if VW did more along the lines with what Porsche did the setup would be better. The optional adjustable OEM PASM/Bilstein suspension for Porsche has a “Normal” and “Sport” mode, no comfort. The normal mode on a Porsche Boxster is plenty comfortable. I think it may be asking too much of a spring to accommodate both extremes of the spectrum.

I had read previously that people complained about the DG springs causing the ride to be bouncier. Where does it state that the DG springs are suitable for GTIs with DCC?

Bilstein doesn’t make a DampTronic dampener to use with lowering springs the B6s are for the stock OEM springs so they force you to go with the B16 DampTronic coilivers if you want to upgrade the springs and dampeners. Since I plan to get a 2022 Golf 8 R I think I’ll hold off with upgrading. The Golf R has a different DCC/Spring set up and I may prefer it. If not, I’ll get the B16 DampTronic coilovers at that time.

Thanks
 

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I took advantage of the 4th of July sales and ditched the stock Pirellis for Michelin Sport 4S because I’m going for a road trip along Big Sur and through the Redwoods (Hated the Pirellis). I would have gone with the German made Goodyear Eagle Asymmetric 3 like I had on my ‘17 GTI Sport, but Goodyear no longer makes our size.

The excessive unsafe body roll I experienced while doing a freeway speed defensive maneuver was in “Comfort”. I no longer use comfort and just use “Normal” or “Sport” and my son is fine with it, but still prefers the suspension setup on my previous ‘17 GTI.

It makes sense that the DCC springs are higher as they have to accommodate three different driving modes. From my experience back when I had a Corrado people lowered mostly for looks not handling. Back then putting in lowering springs while keeping OEM struts caused them to work harder. Sometimes they blew outright and failed.

I think if VW did more along the lines with what Porsche did the setup would be better. The optional adjustable OEM PASM/Bilstein suspension for Porsche has a “Normal” and “Sport” mode, no comfort. The normal mode on a Porsche Boxster is plenty comfortable. I think it may be asking too much of a spring to accommodate both extremes of the spectrum.

I had read previously that people complained about the DG springs causing the ride to be bouncier. Where does it state that the DG springs are suitable for GTIs with DCC?

Bilstein doesn’t make a DampTronic dampener to use with lowering springs the B6s are for the stock OEM springs so they force you to go with the B16 DampTronic coilivers if you want to upgrade the springs and dampeners. Since I plan to get a 2022 Golf 8 R I think I’ll hold off with upgrading. The Golf R has a different DCC/Spring set up and I may prefer it. If not, I’ll get the B16 DampTronic coilovers at that time.

Thanks
When I purchased/installed my DG springs, I found a VW document that lists all the different P/N's of DG springs for different applications (ex: 4dr DSG vs. 2dr manual), there was an indicator that DG springs were approved for use with DCC dampers. The overall lowering is less than 10mm below stock non-DCC ride height. I've been running them for 5 years/40k miles with no ill effects. There's an extensive thread in the Mk7 forum about the DG springs that talks about use with DCC dampers.

I haven't found them to be bouncy, other than in Sport setting over things like expansion joints on the freeway. Comfort and Normal modes are fine. I'm running Michelin AS/3+, which are not quite as sticky as the PS4S (I'm running those on my C6 Corvette), they are a vast improvement over the OEM Pirellis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I went on a road trip up to NorCal to take my son camping and shortly outside of Los Angeles my DCC suspension broke in. Normal now feels quite comfortable for cruising on the highway. Comfort is good for terrible city roads for downtown San Francisco or Los Angeles. Eco is great for when you are below below a quarter tank out in the boonies and on the way to a remote gas station.

And Sport is for any time you want to go fast in the curves or need to drive aggressively. On my road trip I went through Big Sur and in Sport mode with my 2019 GTI SE I was able to drive much faster through the tight curves compared to my old 2017 GTI Sport with standard sport suspension.

For those looking for a better DCC suspension, the 2022 Golf GTI and R will have it. The Golf 8 GTI’s Springs in the front will be 5% stiffer and in the rear they will be 15% stiffer. Also the dampeners are fully adjustable, not just Eco, Comfort, Normal Sport. It will now be anywhere below comfort, above sport or anywhere in between.

I bet you could swap in Golf 8 GTI springs into a Golf 7 GTI with DCC...
 
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