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Is it contributing? Of course! But arguing a lack of disposable income applies to pretty much every hobby ever, I feel it's a bit of a cop out when you're upset something you like is losing popularity. For sports cars I'd guess it's a 2nd or 3rd order concern. I think the main issue is that interest is shifting to other things, like cell phones, tablets, travel, etc. I'm obsessed with cars, but frankly if I could only pick one between my phone and my Cayman it'd be the phone every time, it just has that much more impact on my life. And the secondary driver being how sport compacts/coupes/sedans/crossovers are all so good these days that they've made sports cars obsolete in many regards. There used to be a valid reason to give up four doors and a back seat, now there's only emotional ones.

Ironic thing is that one of the reasons I dropped my R&T subscription a couple years back is that I thought they were too hoity toity, nitpicking McLarens and such.
 

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Everything in the article is all well and good, but seems reluctant to face another part of reality, that young people just don't give a **** about cars, period. Even if they had the money, blowing it on a sports car isn't where 99.9% of people aged 22-35 are going to put it anyway. I mean, I haven't blown my money on a sports car and I'm even a car guy. In fact, I tried to dump my turdgen this summer with no plans to replace.

I'd rather just buy a nice sporty suv and call it a day.
I think it's a lot the bolded section. You could put out whatever cheap fun car you want and the young person will still buy the comfiest and fanciest looking car they can afford, not the most fun. GTI, Miata, Mini S, Fiat 124, EcoBoost Mustang... Tons of fun cheaper "enthusiast" options out there and young folks aren't buying them. They're buying CUV's and practical cars. I also think a lot of people my age or more concerned with looks and status. A CPO Audi A3 "looks better" than new GLI. A CX-3 is more practical and "adulting" than a Miata, even though they have no kids or pets. People my age want to be grown up and taken more seriously. Showing up to work in a crossover somehow accomplishes that better than a hot hatch.


With all that being said, I do agree income inequality plays a part in all of that... Just wanted to add my 2 cents.
 

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This is spot on. The fact that a mainstream car magazine is writing about the issue shows how apparent it’s become. Obviously with the shrinking of the enthusiast market, there goes the viability of Road and Track.

Can’t forget that a $30k BRZ is still a huge stretch for most people.
Adjusted for inflation, I don't think that it is worse than it was.

I bought a 1992 Mazda Precidia V6 for $17695, including $600 optional ABS..... which is $28495 today (with much more content).

I tend to agree that young people are less car nuts than we were. Way more pick-ups & SUVs.
 

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Well. Yep.

I'm making about as much as I ever thought I would, and I can't really afford anything new out there now. Instead, I'm pretty much relegated to maintaining the E46.

Even moving down the East coast a bit, to a much smaller city, much less expensive area...it'll still be slim.

I gave my dreams of having more than 2 cars up (and a place to keep them) a long time ago.
yeah that's me too. I'd happily jump on the BRZ bandwagon and encourage that part of the market, but it doesn't seem like I'll be able to afford a toy (let alone a $30,000+tax 5-months-a-year that only I will enjoy kinda toy) anytime soon. Maybe when I'm 50 or so.

Cost of living + priorities are killing it off.
 

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I don't disagree that housing / insurance / school costs are insane but I would say income is only half of the equation. What you spend is too. I see so many younger co-workers spending money on Starbucks, eating lunch out, new electronics, going out drinking (at lease before Covid). It's all about what you want your priorities to be.
 

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Yes, student loan debt and healthcare costs. As well as the huge economic shock the Great Recession had, and increasing global competition for jobs across the board. I'd wager median rents, which are more indicative/relevant to people in this age bracket, have outpaced purchasing power over that time as low rates have forced more growth/profit out of everything investable
I don't understand why this is such an issue. I did get some help in undergrad from grants and scholarships but I've paid my way through a masters + 45 and an additional degree. I keep hearing talk of the government paying off student debt but what about those of us who sacrificed to pay for college?

I don't disagree that housing / insurance / school costs are insane but I would say income is only half of the equation. What you spend is too. I see so many younger co-workers spending money on Starbucks, eating lunch out, new electronics, going out drinking (at lease before Covid). It's all about what you want your priorities to be.
This, if you cut out outrageous cell phone bills, $100 trips to the bar, $200 shoes you can pay off a lot of debt.
 

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Poor people in this country have never been wealthier. Everyone lives in air conditioning, has multiple cars, cable TV, Netflix, internet access, laptops, flat panel TVs, and the newest cell phone. They eat out at restaurants so much they're morbidly obese.

People didn't have nearly as much crap when I was growing up as they do now. Cut all the recurring bills that are not necessities and people could afford housing, health care, and new cars. But that ain't what they're spending their money on.
 

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Also, if you guys haven’t read the comments on the article, they definitely skew differently than the comments here.
From reading most R&T articles and the ads that are placed in the magazine, I always imagined the readership is mostly the people that would attend Mecum or Barret Jackson or invited events at the Ferrari dealership. While I'm not convinced income equality is the primary driver of sports car demise (I love them but expect them to phase out regardless), after considering your comment and checking the ones on R&T, I'm now thinking that article is actually pretty well placed. :beer:
 

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I think a correlate question would be:
Would young people be more inclined to buy fun cars if they had more buying power?

Subquestion:
Would this also be changed by the availability of more leisure time?

Both disposable income and free time have gone down tremendously in the last few decades.
I remember a study showing if you make an average wage, you essentially have to work without any vacation time to just cover cost of living. Would more people buy Miatas and roadtrip the coast if they had more time off and more money? Would you be more inclined to wrench on your car if you had more time off? Maybe.

Also, if you guys haven’t read the comments on the article, they definitely skew differently than the comments here.
Oh crap, what am i doing right now? I'm squandering my free time on the internet when I could be doing real world stuff. logging out now.
 

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We're a DINK household and college grads with professional incomes that afford us a nice yearly takeaway, but they're not wrong with housing costs. It's appalling what my little house would sell for, and even then, buying a depreciating $50k vehicle seems like crazy talk when compared my home value and mortgage balance.

The wife really wants a new Bronco. It is absolutely WILD to me that sticker price on a new model will be more than the stickers of our CX-5 and GTI combined. We're right in the target market for these vehicles, can afford them, but just aren't willing to take on debt in that area. I don't think we're the only ones.
 

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Poor people in this country have never been wealthier. Everyone lives in air conditioning, has multiple cars, cable TV, Netflix, internet access, laptops, flat panel TVs, and the newest cell phone. They eat out at restaurants so much they're morbidly obese.

People didn't have nearly as much crap when I was growing up as they do now. Cut all the recurring bills that are not necessities and people could afford housing, health care, and new cars. But that ain't what they're spending their money on.
well hold on there. sounds like you're describing middle class. :laugh:

your poor people can barely afford ramen noodles and take an hour-long bus ride to a minimum wage job.
 

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Everything in the article is all well and good, but seems reluctant to face another part of reality, that young people just don't give a **** about cars, period. Even if they had the money, blowing it on a sports car isn't where 99.9% of people aged 22-35 are going to put it anyway. I mean, I haven't blown my money on a sports car and I'm even a car guy. In fact, I tried to dump my turdgen this summer with no plans to replace.

I'd rather just buy a nice sporty suv and call it a day.
Nope.
 

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I don't disagree that housing / insurance / school costs are insane but I would say income is only half of the equation. What you spend is too. I see so many younger co-workers spending money on Starbucks, eating lunch out, new electronics, going out drinking (at lease before Covid). It's all about what you want your priorities to be.
Is their avocado toast habit stopping them from getting a home loan? The rhetoric that Starbucks is bankrupting millennials is so silly.

I’m a physician in training on a junior government salary. I’m essentially getting paid what my father got paid doing the same thing 30 years ago. I can’t afford half the house in half as nice of an area as he did. You know what I can afford? To eat lunch out and buy craft beer. The relative costs aren’t even comparable. I’d have to drink 120 lattes a month just to cover the property tax on my 2+2 postage stamp on the wrong side of the tracks.
 

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I don't disagree that housing / insurance / school costs are insane but I would say income is only half of the equation. What you spend is too. I see so many younger co-workers spending money on Starbucks, eating lunch out, new electronics, going out drinking (at lease before Covid). It's all about what you want your priorities to be.
I get that you see that, but I think you don't appreciate how much cost of living has increased relative to wages. The Boomers are the single most spoiled generation in human history. The cost of college and univesity in Communist Canada has increased well beyond the rate of inflation year-over-year for the last five decades. From 2006 to 2016, post secondary education tuition increased by 40% in Canada. Even in the heart of the Great Depression, we were seeing increases in excess of 5% per year. The average price of a freehold house in the Greater Toronto Area, which accounts for 1/3 of Canada's GDP, has increased from $270,000 in 1990 to $940,000 in 2018. But sure, put it on young people's lifestyles :facepalm:.
 

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Is their avocado toast habit stopping them from getting a home loan? The rhetoric that Starbucks is bankrupting millennials is so silly.

I’m a physician in training on a junior government salary. I’m essentially getting paid what my father got paid doing the same thing 30 years ago. I can’t afford half the house in half as nice of an area as he did. You know what I can afford? To eat lunch out and buy craft beer. The relative costs aren’t even comparable. I’d have to drink 120 lattes a month just to cover the property tax on my 2+2 postage stamp on the wrong side of the tracks.
Thank you. The company I work for doesn't even interview people if they do not have a Masters degree. The Executive Director I replaced had a Bachelors Degree and he paid $4,000 for it. I have a PhD and I did both my MSc and PhD faster than average, but tuition was still $14k per year. His house was $70,000 and it's now worth over $2 million. Do I get paid more than he did when he assumed the role two decades ago? Yes. Are our costs of living or the costs to attain our positions even remotely the same and does my higher salary account for that? Hell no.
 

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LOL at lamenting about inequality of outcome.

Get the latest cell phone with a big data plan, get a new mak bok every two years. Buy expensive clothes, travel as often as possible. Buy, buy, buy, spend, spend, spend... :D

Interest rates are historically low. I remember 15% interest rates for mortgages.

It's not how much you earn that matters, it's how much you keep, ie invest elsewhere.

cf. Rich Dad, Poor Dad.
 

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We're a DINK household and college grads with professional incomes that afford us a nice yearly takeaway, but they're not wrong with housing costs. It's appalling what my little house would sell for, and even then, buying a depreciating $50k vehicle seems like crazy talk when compared my home value and mortgage balance.

The wife really wants a new Bronco. It is absolutely WILD to me that sticker price on a new model will be more than the stickers of our CX-5 and GTI combined. We're right in the target market for these vehicles, can afford them, but just aren't willing to take on debt in that area. I don't think we're the only ones.
I also love the new Bronco, but $50k is nuts for something that I would want to use (and slightly abuse) offroad.

I was just thinking about this the other day while parked next to a bolt-on "built" JKU. People drop $50k on Wranglers and then throw $10-15k of parts on them, just to daily drive them and maybe or maybe not use them as intended off road.
 

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LOL at lamenting about inequality of outcome.

Get the latest cell phone with a big data plan, get a new mak bok every two years. Buy expensive clothes, travel as often as possible. Buy, buy, buy, spend, spend, spend... :D

Interest rates are historically low. I remember 15% interest rates for mortgages.

It's not how much you earn that matters, it's how much you keep, ie invest elsewhere.

cf. Rich Dad, Poor Dad.
Oh hey, someone didn't read my post about the cost of living and education. Are you a Boomer too?
 
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