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I’m not a loser. I’m a winnah!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


http://annyas.com/chevrolet-speedometer-design/

2011 marks the 100th anniversary of Chevrolet. During these 100 years the company developed over a hundred different types of cars, vans and trucks. All of those cars, vans and trucks have something in common: they all contain speedometers.

Speedometers are those kind of items you look at thousands of times during your live, without ever really noticing. You notice the speed, not the meter. And if you do notice the meter chances are you don’t realize someone actually designed it. The company probably even did some research beforehand. Research regarding the readability of typefaces, the right size of the numbers and the space between them.

The design of speedometers hasn’t changed much over the decades. Recently, however, there’s a trend towards digital meters. They’re probably supposed to look fresh and new, but due to the use of stopwatch-like (the digital stopwatch was invented in 1971) typefaces they actually look extremely primitive and dated.

It’s easy for a driver to get used to a needle that rises and passes numbers that are located on fixed positions. A quick glance is all it takes to see and understand the value it represents. With the most recent design it’s different. The value of the ‘stopwatch’ constantly changes while driving. Some characters of the typeface look very similar to others (for instance 0, 6 and 8), which makes it harder to figure out whether you’ll get a speeding ticket or not. Not an ideal situation.
 

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Recently, however, there’s a trend towards digital meters.
I have noticed a consistency in GM gauges. Mostly just in the typeface, as stated in the article. GM has had a lot of different styles. for their speedometers over the years. Overall, I find that people eventually grow tired of them (graphs, rollers, digital) and eventually the critics and consumers demand analog.
Look at the Chevrolet Astro in it's long production run. It had some sort of strange graph thing, digital, and in the end only analog was available.
Many car companies had digital available at one time and have returned to analog. The trend if anything is analog for the important gauges with LCD or digital supplementing for the less important features.

Astro/Safari




Bonus, strange Toronado barrel thing.
 

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I’m not a loser. I’m a winnah!!
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44,924 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have noticed a consistency in GM gauges. Mostly just in the typeface, as stated in the article. GM has had a lot of different styles. for their speedometers over the years. Overall, I find that people eventually grow tired of them (graphs, rollers, digital) and eventually the critics and consumers demand analog.
Look at the Chevrolet Astro in it's long production run. It had some sort of strange graph thing, digital, and in the end only analog was available.
Many car companies had digital available at one time and have returned to analog. The trend if anything is analog for the important gauges with LCD or digital supplementing for the less important features.

Bonus, strange Toronado barrel thing.
I remember those, really cool stuff during the '60s. :thumbup:

My brother used to have a '61 Plymouth Fury. It was black and we called it the Batmobile because it was long and low and just looked cool. It had a big ovular steering wheel for one thing, but the speedometer was like a bar graph, little plastic pieces would rise up with your speed. The trans was also a push button unit to the left of the wheel. I wish he wouldn't gave gotten rid of it. Very cool car. :thumbup:

(not his, but a convertible)

 

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Get Off My Lawn!!!
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What more do you expect from gm, they never like to change anything but the body style.
Olde TCL saying goes; "It's better to have others think you are ignorant than to type responses to topics in TCL that confirms it for them." :)
 

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Get Off My Lawn!!!
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Buick tried a novel and interesting approach to instrument readability/ergonomics in 1961, with their adjustable-angle speedometer. The actual instrument is not visible, being laid-flat at the base of the cluster, with numerals printed backwards and upside-down. The visible speedometer display is actually a mirror-image of it, and if you look to the right of the speedmeter dispay, a thumbwheel is visible that allows the driver to adjust the angle of the mirror for better sight-line. One-year only.

 

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'18 BRZ
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why does the Cruzes speedo go up to 220?

Made me chuckle
because race car?! This actually surprised me.


But...that's the 2.0T diesel that we don't get here (yet?)...the 1.4L Ecotec I drove was torquey enough for pleasant mild-mannered performance at sensible speeds, but when you put your foot down, there was nothing there. Another thing is, there are a few Youtube videos of people maxing out their 2.0T's, but I can't find the equivalent vid for a 1.4T...
 
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