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Hi all,

I understand this is a tech forum and wasn't sure if thesis the correct place to post this. if this is the wrong place then please guide me to a correct forum. Anyways onto my question. I have owned two GTI's in the past with the 1.8T engine and worked for VW in 2003 but I know nothing about the 2.5L engine. I'm looking to get a new used Jetta or Passat and pretty much ignored the 2.5L models because I hear it's not a good engine. I'm hoping for first hand experience from people who have owned a VW with this engine. Is it actually a good and reliable engine? What is your fuel economy? It appears when i'm looking online at cars the 2.5L version is less expensive then the 1.8T. I'm hoping to get good feedback from fellow VW fans and owners. Thanks
I know im late to this but I just got a free one off of my cousin and it has almost 175k miles. they have had no issues and the only thing I had to do was replace a pcv diaphragm. engine is pretty torquey and definitely isn't slow. if you comfortable pushing past 130 I would go for a faster car. but if not if feels great around corners, and sounds great. there are a few more things I have to do to bring it back to original condition. the clutch is worn, but that's expected, and I screwed up a cv joint when I hit a curb the first week I got it.
 

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Oh yeah

Well here's my 2 cents
I bought my 06 2.5 jetta from Carmax in September of 2k9 and I still have it to this day.it had 44k miles when I bought it and I just cracked 150k last week. I drive the dog out of it for years and the only time the cel came on was 3 yrs ago and it was the n80 purge valve, that's it.other than regular maintenance I think it's a bullet proof motor,oh and I never put premium gas,always regular from shell,texaco,chevron, you know the top tier gas stations and every other fill up put in 6 o/z or marvel mystery oil in the gas.thats it.
Bought a 2013 VW Passat 2.5L model new and I have been very pleased with the 5-cyl engine and the 6-speed automatic transmission from Aisin. This car just passed 110,000 miles. Even with sometimes aggressive daily driving over the last 7 years this drivetrain has required no repairs and still seems to perform about as well as it did the first year. I've had all of the recommended maintenance done on schedule, including an oil change every 10,000 miles.

The Passat and other current VW models seem to have a higher oil capacity than cars from most other manufacturers. Depending on the source, my 2013 Passat takes from 6.3 to 6.8 quarts of synthetic oil. As I recall, other VW models like the Golf and Jetta require similar quantities of oil. This is in contrast to many 4-cyl engines from other makers which tend to require just 4 to 4.5 quarts of oil. Does VW do this to help in engine cooling? Or perhaps to enable the longer oil change intervals - with a larger fluid capacity to dilute "dirty oil" build-up between changes?

By the way, the latest standard VW Golf model in the US offers only a 1.4L turbocharged 4-cyl engine and the VW website listed the oil capacity as just 4 quarts. And in something of a break with tradition the 1.4 engine also features an aluminum block.
 

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I have owned a half dozen each of the 2.0T and 2.5 VW cars. I like both motors. Turbo is more power, more fun, better mileage. Kinda sounds like a diesel though. And about five times more likely to need work compared to the 2.5. Most of that is turbo-related, and the timing chains and tensioner are issues, but also the water pump. I am an expert at the 2.0T water pump replacement, but have no idea how to do a 2.5 because none have ever failed on me.

Wait, I forgot the most important difference: turbo builds up carbon in the valves and intake that has to be cleaned manually...that alone is going to be the biggest reason that if I had to maintain a fleet of cars I'd much rather have the 2.5 than any turbo. Unless I was driving one, and then I'd pick the turbo and suffer through the extra maintenance.
 

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I've owned mine for probably 3 years now and I love it. 2005 to 2008 was the first version of the 2.5 5 cylinder which apparently it has a timing chain problem but I think it's all in how often you maintenance the engine. If you do regular maintenance it should last you a long time. In 2008.5 the revised 2.5 came out with minor changes but overall good ones. Mines a 2010 with the 5 speed manual so I have MK6 interior bits and electronics but MK5 body style. I like the 2.5 I think it's good engine. Sure it has minor issues but what engine doesn't? It's not a death sentence to get one but like every car if you take care of it it will last. Fuel economy is not bad I get about ~20ish miles a gallon an I do NOT baby it. But I also don't beat the **** out of it
I have a 2008 vw rabbit with the 2.5l never 291,000 miles on it never had any issues just normal breaks and rotors oil changes I just replaced the back shocks a week ago will do the front soon
 

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Hi all,

I understand this is a tech forum and wasn't sure if thesis the correct place to post this. if this is the wrong place then please guide me to a correct forum. Anyways onto my question. I have owned two GTI's in the past with the 1.8T engine and worked for VW in 2003 but I know nothing about the 2.5L engine. I'm looking to get a new used Jetta or Passat and pretty much ignored the 2.5L models because I hear it's not a good engine. I'm hoping for first hand experience from people who have owned a VW with this engine. Is it actually a good and reliable engine? What is your fuel economy? It appears when i'm looking online at cars the 2.5L version is less expensive then the 1.8T. I'm hoping to get good feedback from fellow VW fans and owners. Thanks
Even though this is an old thread, the question is still current. My current experience is that my 2008 Rabbit 2.5 with the 09G Aisin automatic Tiptronic transmission has 150K miles on it and runs great. I've replaced the small odds and ends that wear out but none had died before I did it. It burns no oil and the leaking seal on the vacuum pump was replaced, so I have no leaks. The transmission fluid gets changed @ 30K mile intervals and works perfectly.
Here is what little I do know: the Mark 5 runs from 2006-2009. The first two years had 150 hp and also had the timing chain tensioner issue. The 2008 model got 20 more hp for a total of 170 hp and the timing chain tensioners were no longer a problem (mine makes no noise). The valves adjusters are hydraulic so no adjusting is needed. For gas mileage, I usually get in the mid-20's around town and in the mid-30's on the interstate.
It has a few electrical quirks but I can live with them. It always starts and has never let me down.
I use Castrol Edge Platinum (formerly known as Euro) 5W/40 and Aisin T-4 transmission fluid. I used to change the transmission filter but it was always clean, so I plan to skip this in the future unless I see a need to change it, such as a mechanical repair and the transmission is apart. But right now, the engine and transmission are running perfectly.
DIY maintenance is the typical German PITA. It beats me how they can take something simple and make it complicated. I do about 90% of the maintenance, myself.
Hope this helps.
 

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Even though this is an old thread, the question is still current. My current experience is that my 2008 Rabbit 2.5 with the 09G Aisin automatic Tiptronic transmission has 150K miles on it and runs great. I've replaced the small odds and ends that wear out but none had died before I did it. It burns no oil and the leaking seal on the vacuum pump was replaced, so I have no leaks. The transmission fluid gets changed @ 30K mile intervals and works perfectly.
Here is what little I do know: the Mark 5 runs from 2006-2009. The first two years had 150 hp and also had the timing chain tensioner issue. The 2008 model got 20 more hp for a total of 170 hp and the timing chain tensioners were no longer a problem (mine makes no noise). The valves adjusters are hydraulic so no adjusting is needed. For gas mileage, I usually get in the mid-20's around town and in the mid-30's on the interstate.
It has a few electrical quirks but I can live with them. It always starts and has never let me down.
I use Castrol Edge Platinum (formerly known as Euro) 5W/40 and Aisin T-4 transmission fluid. I used to change the transmission filter but it was always clean, so I plan to skip this in the future unless I see a need to change it, such as a mechanical repair and the transmission is apart. But right now, the engine and transmission are running perfectly.
DIY maintenance is the typical German PITA. It beats me how they can take something simple and make it complicated. I do about 90% of the maintenance, myself.
Hope this helps.
UPDATE: Because my battery light was coming on briefly after a cold start, combined with the fact that the alternator was the original one, I decided to go ahead and replace it with a new one (remanufactured one with a lifetime warranty from NAPA). Now, the battery light is gone and all of my electrical gremlins are gone. Beats me, but I'm happy.

Also, there is an upgrade on the A/C compressor's solenoid valve made by RKX which makes the compressor cool quicker and cooler with less wear on the compressor. I installed it and the difference is amazing.

There is a vacuum pump delete blocking plate by Integrated Engineering that replaces the vacuum pump that I installed. I now source the vacuum for the brake booster from the N80 evap emissions hose with a tee-connector. No more vacuum pump leaks (I had replaced the front seal, but the back seal and o-ring gasket on the hose were leaking.), less parasitic drain on horsepower. There is a post on the VWVortex forum with details. It cost less than half what the Spulen kit costs and was easier to do.

Life is good. I love my Rabbit which now has over 152K miles on it. If only the German engineers hadn't made the DIY servicing so darned hard!
 

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Hi all,

I understand this is a tech forum and wasn't sure if thesis the correct place to post this. if this is the wrong place then please guide me to a correct forum. Anyways onto my question. I have owned two GTI's in the past with the 1.8T engine and worked for VW in 2003 but I know nothing about the 2.5L engine. I'm looking to get a new used Jetta or Passat and pretty much ignored the 2.5L models because I hear it's not a good engine. I'm hoping for first hand experience from people who have owned a VW with this engine. Is it actually a good and reliable engine? What is your fuel economy? It appears when i'm looking online at cars the 2.5L version is less expensive then the 1.8T. I'm hoping to get good feedback from fellow VW fans and owners. Thanks
Hi bro. I got my jetta st 92000 miles i now have 161000 all ive changed is two spark plugs and coils i love this 2.5 its the engine you want the smaller 4 banger needs a turbo for the same car but the tourq is much better in a 5 cyl pluss the racing heritage of the 5 is a bit of a nerd thing but its good get it
 

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Research the reliability issues of the I-4 turbo vs the I-5 non-turbo. If you want a fun car for the short term that you will dispose of when done, the GTI. If you want a work horse that will run forever with just basic maintenance, get the non-turbo Rabbit (Golf in Europe).

My 2008 Rabbit has more than enough power for my needs. I found that if necessary, I can cruise at 95 mph in comfort with the engine still breathing very easily. I never have to worry about the engine running too hot or needing to cool down after running hard for extended periods. As I said earlier, no leaks, no overheating and no oil consumption between 5K mile oil changes. I do 95% of the maintenance myself. I have the 09G semi-automatic Tiptronic transmission and I run it in Sport mode (lower gear ratios in all 6 gears) on all secondary roads. I only use the Drive mode (standard ratios) in automatic or manual shift on the interstate above 70 mph. Doing this, I regularly get gas mileage in the mid-20's around town and mid-30's on the interstate. Also, I only use VW spec fluids in engine, transmission and cooling system.
 

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... I have the 09G semi-automatic Tiptronic transmission and I run it in Sport mode (lower gear ratios in all 6 gears) on all secondary roads. I only use the Drive mode (standard ratios) in automatic or manual shift on the interstate above 70 mph.
There are only six forward gears in the transmission. Sport Mode only means the shift happens at a higher RPM. Gear ratios don't change.
 

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There are only six forward gears in the transmission. Sport Mode only means the shift happens at a higher RPM. Gear ratios don't change.
Technically, you are correct. I should have said, "lower ratio shifting" in the same gears. The effective top gear ratios do change because you stay in the lower range/higher rpm's all the time. When I drive in Drive mode, I feel like I'm driving a 1960's Buick with the rpm's trying to stay below 2000 rpm's all the time. I do 90% of my driving in Sport mode.

There is an error in the driver's manual which says that it will not shift down earlier in Sport Mode when it actually does. As I slow down for turns or stops, I love watching my tach jump up to higher rpm's and listening to the engine. I wonder why VW put that statement in there.
 

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My wife has a 2014 Golf with the 2.5, automatic 6 speed. Just for refference, my daily is a TT with the 1.8T.
I really like driving her car. The low end torque compared to the 1.8T is very enjoyable for stoplight grand prix, otherwise known as American urban driving. It has been a wonderful car and wonderful engine.
We had one issue with it. It kept throwing a code for the sensor that's inside the intake manifold, right behind the throttle body. It was getting oil on it.
I installed a catch can, and those problems have been behind us ever since. I was never a big fan boy for catch cans, in fact of the 4 vehicles we have in current rotation, the Golf was the first one to get one. I am now a fan boy for catch cans. They have proven their worth. The other vehicles, they're just nice to have, but with the Golf 2.5, it was mandatory.
My youngest son now has a "Rabbit" with the 2.5. I highly recommend that motor for anyone that wants a fun reliable car that certainly gets out of it's own way, but if you're out to crush every car out there, might not be the one for you.
 

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My wife has a 2014 Golf with the 2.5, automatic 6 speed. Just for refference, my daily is a TT with the 1.8T.
I really like driving her car. The low end torque compared to the 1.8T is very enjoyable for stoplight grand prix, otherwise known as American urban driving. It has been a wonderful car and wonderful engine.
We had one issue with it. It kept throwing a code for the sensor that's inside the intake manifold, right behind the throttle body. It was getting oil on it.
I installed a catch can, and those problems have been behind us ever since. I was never a big fan boy for catch cans, in fact of the 4 vehicles we have in current rotation, the Golf was the first one to get one. I am now a fan boy for catch cans. They have proven their worth. The other vehicles, they're just nice to have, but with the Golf 2.5, it was mandatory.
My youngest son now has a "Rabbit" with the 2.5. I highly recommend that motor for anyone that wants a fun reliable car that certainly gets out of it's own way, but if you're out to crush every car out there, might not be the one for you.
You should always check the PCV diaphragm if oil is fouling that sensor. They tear and oil/vapor passes into the manifold and kinda puddles up and gets on that sensor. A torn diaphragm will cause other minor problems and it's a cheap maintenance item.
 

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You should always check the PCV diaphragm if oil is fouling that sensor. They tear and oil/vapor passes into the manifold and kinda puddles up and gets on that sensor. A torn diaphragm will cause other minor problems and it's a cheap maintenance item.
Ya. Of course. I assumed it was torn, so, bought a new one, ready to put in. The original was perfect.
Anyway, a perfectly good PCV diaphragm is not above reproach, on this car or any other, in regards to crank case vapor getting to the intake.
 

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If you check the reviews on other forums and YouTube videos, you will find the aftermarket PCV valve rubber diaphragm fails prematurely. The best recommendation is to replace the entire valve cover with an OEM one from Amazon or other vendors. It includes the valve cover with the integral PCV valve, gasket and bolts. Easy replacement and everything is less than $100. (At least it was before Bidenflation took over.)
 
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