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I got $150 for a popped tire last year from the city for a pothole that was 4" deep. I plan on sending all of this via mail to Rumney NH town. Shown in arrow where the frost-heave is. I'm waiting until everything is finalized before I invoice them.

My town of Canaan NH was out putting down gravel / tar last week in a few massive heaves for safety reasons. This one was massive and didn't even have a warning sign placed next to it.
Sounds like a slam dunk!
 

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One of the many reasons never to go with springs, obviously hindsight is here but you should always have a skid plate if the car is lowered. If you had cool overs you could at least raise it during the winter.

We all learn the hard way lol


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Glad it's sounding like it may work out without too many crazy expenses then.

May I jokingly suggest a Bilstein 5100 w/ Eibach Spring coilover kit? Did wonders for my 4Runner!

All you guys have the wrong idea with going lower! Lift all the things!
 

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Hope its just a cracked pan, here is my son's sad story on his 2011 Golf TDI -

Upstate NY (Rochester) in the snow a driver is coming down a hill as he is heading up, other driver loses control, crosses double yellow and my son swerves to avoid. He hits a pretty tall curb, goes over it and comes back down. Knows right away something is wrong with the car and drives it to a public lot and parks (no warning lights). Steel wheel is bent and snow tire is toast up front on the side he hit the curb. It's late and he calls a buddy for a ride and decides will come back next day, throw the temp spare on and drive to a tire place to price a replacement wheel and tire.

Puts temp on, starts car drives about 45-60 seconds and gets the oil pressure warning stop immediate light. That's when he calls me. Since we had the goodwill towing package I said lets just get it straight to the dealer.

Well - the cracked aluminum oil pan, damaged POS plastic belly pan and new steelie and snow tire was annoying. But the turbo replacement was A LOT WORSE. He didn't notice the oil and the pan must have emtpied overnight. Hard to believe the turbo shaft/bearings were destroyed by just a minute of cold operation!
 

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I'd imagine it's more than a fracked pan if you hard metal noises


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I'm thinking this too. If not this then the latter part where the oil icon finally appears on the engine restart.

It's just weird that the oil icon didn't flicker or anything on starvation.

I'm thinking OP might be better off WITH immediate signs of engine damage. Better now than 10k down the road when you can't make a claim.

Edit: Maybe better off with no immediate damage actually, than OP could make warranty claim down the road and not pay the deductible.
 

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Here's my email to the auto shop. Let's see what happens next.
I prefer steel over aluminum. Steel just dents, and absorbs hits better whereas aluminum would crack like plastic on a hard enough impact, plus the price of the one that haus of dubs sells is just right. Plus, if you get a skidplate as well you will have some serious protection.
 

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I prefer steel over aluminum. Steel just dents, and absorbs hits better whereas aluminum would crack like plastic on a hard enough impact, plus the price of the one that haus of dubs sells is just right. Plus, if you get a skidplate as well you will have some serious protection.
Serious question re: steel vs. aluminum; I know with most everything AL, you can't simply bend things back after being bent and expect the same strength properties. Is that true with steel? For example, say Adam has the misfortune of hitting another White Walker sized frost heave and dents a steel pan. Can he just pull the pan and form the pan back into place with little material strength loss?
 

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Very close to this size is what I hit.:

That's nuts! We don't get anything nearly that big here in the the PNW. Mostly just potholes and little 3-4 inch frost heave type things. I wonder why yours are so much more brutal?

For a winter vehicle maybe look into an old truck. I had a 1994 chevy silverado diesel that I drove in the winters until I sold it last summer (my wife has a forester that we take to the ski hill, etc, so wasn't using it much). That thing was an absolute beast. Bought it for $4,700, sold it 4 years later for $4,500.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 · (Edited)
That's nuts! We don't get anything nearly that big here in the the PNW. Mostly just potholes and little 3-4 inch frost heave type things. I wonder why yours are so much more brutal?
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I'm sure someone born and raised here knows more but my assumption is a few things. NH has no sales or income tax so things suffer. there's not a full-time fire department within 20 miles of me..everything is volunteer and each town might have 1 peace keeper on duty 8 hours a day. It's not unusual for a helicopter to pick you up because the ambulance is 45 minutes away. All roads in NH are plowed when storms hit. a lot of money goes toward road plowing.

My local town spent 2.9 million in 2014..that's the entire town budget ( I know, laugh it up) but of that figure, 780K was spent entirely on road clearing, maintenance, repairs. It was the highest single expense of the year followed by town personnel salaries.

So while we spend a lot, there are some factors to keep in mind
-First snow fall is usually sometime in October
-Last Snow fall can be end of April but most significant snow is finished the 4th week of March
-Vermont to Maine (west to east), there are no interstates that go east to west. If you want to travel from Boston up to Canada through VT, NH, ME, you're in luck there are national interstates that run but if you want to go east to west, you're going to be on backroads which means these towns have to maintain roads for very large trucks This can get expensive

The long winters paired with large trucks means that the ground is constantly freezing, thawing and ice expands and it leads to cracks in the road and large humps and sometimes a sinking will occur which leads to pot-holes coming out of nowhere.

So we have this being pretty common between February & April every single year:




Late March, Mud Season starts:






Mud season is also called stick-season. There's no snow on the ground, no green leaves, no skiing, just nasty mud and bare-trees.

Up here, it's actually cheaper for towns to maintain dirt roads (gravel and grating once a year) than pour asphalt or patch up asphalt. A combo of low tax income and road budget that goes toward salt, dirt and plowing 6 months out of the year means dirt is just a more economical thing to maintain. So on almost all roads that are not county / state roads, you're going to be on dirt.

....but I hope this doesn't mean people are going to now ask me why I have a lowered Golf R :)

I like my car, it just means dealing with replacing body pieces and under body stuff once a year as things arise.




Despite my costly repairs, this has been a very educational thread :) :thumbup:
 

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Very close to this size is what I hit.:

How on Earth is that acceptable to leave on a major road? Or at least, leave without any signage or cones (I get that this one has 2 tokenly placed cones, but that thing should have flashing plastic barrels around it or something)? That just isn't right and I'd have a hard time not getting all indignantly outraged and writing elected officials and such. I'm not even being sarcastic. Glad you have a cool head about you because I'd be fantasizing about going around to the people in charge of roads there and taking a sledge to their rims to give them an...understanding.

Sheeeeesh.

Also, I just noticed your post explaining the particular conditions that lead to roads in this state of disrepair, but I'll submit that Colorado has pretty damn brutal and chaotic weather (you know...metal weather) that starts around late September/October all the way through May. We have huge temperature differences between night and day, heavy trucks, etc., but I'm not used to encountering things like that.

Sure, there are places where there are frost heaves and other asphalt falling off the sides of mountains (I'm looking at you, Mt. Evans), massive boulders tumble onto major interstates (I70), historic floods wash away entire canyon highways, but it just doesn't seem *that* bad...or at least that half-assed in at least making drivers aware of big upheaved parts of the planet lying in your path.

I guess the taxation stuff is where the comparison differs though, so that's a tough one.
 

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How on Earth is that acceptable to leave on a major road? Or at least, leave without any signage or cones (I get that this one has 2 tokenly placed cones, but that thing should have flashing plastic barrels around it or something)? That just isn't right and I'd have a hard time not getting all indignantly outraged and writing elected officials and such. I'm not even being sarcastic. Glad you have a cool head about you because I'd be fantasizing about going around to the people in charge of roads there and taking a sledge to their rims to give them an...understanding.

Sheeeeesh.

Also, I just noticed your post explaining the particular conditions that lead to roads in this state of disrepair, but I'll submit that Colorado has pretty damn brutal and chaotic weather (you know...metal weather) that starts around late September/October all the way through May. We have huge temperature differences between night and day, heavy trucks, etc., but I'm not used to encountering things like that.

Sure, there are places where there are frost heaves and other asphalt falling off the sides of mountains (I'm looking at you, Mt. Evans), massive boulders tumble onto major interstates (I70), historic floods wash away entire canyon highways, but it just doesn't seem *that* bad...or at least that half-assed in at least making drivers aware of big upheaved parts of the planet lying in your path.

I guess the taxation stuff is where the comparison differs though, so that's a tough one.
So what kind of idiot could not see that from 100 yards? Does no one take responsibility for their own actions? If you folks were in the USA in 1800 you would still be huddles along the Atlantic coast.
 
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