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Changed the sensor last night, the car started without hickups, no CEL, no nothing.

All is good in the world.

I diagnosed the issue easily: i was going to run some logs, and saw that vag com was randomly telling me about misfires, and it was cutting off on the RPM signal. Then i got the code 0322, and right away it was clear that the RPM sensor was going bad.

Replacing takes... 30 mins total? remove the undertray and then just unplug, and unbolt. Easy.
 

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does anyone know how to test the sensor? I have taken it out but I have not ordered it yet.
There is some YT videos about testing the crankshaft sensor, you will need tools but I recommend changing for a new one. Had this issue recently in my G35 coupe and replaced both camshaft (bank1&2) and crankshaft sensor together as it's preventative maintenance and was throwing a p0345 code, slip/cel lights came on. Car was having starting problems (extended cranks) but ran like new, but others have the same code would randomly shut off or bog down in traffic...scary! So better to replace it and be done with it.

You don't want to skimp out on the OEM sensors as they will fail prematurely or come DOA. Infiniti sensor was $110/ea they have some online for $40-50 bucks YMMV. Same with VW I would imagine. :thumbup:
 

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Great instructions!!!

I greatly appreciate the play by play instructions and changed the crankshaft sensor in 10 mins overall. Autozone had the sensor $50 bucks plus tax hopefully this will solve the mystery. My issue was the car would start and I'd drive and the car would just cut off and die!!! WTF:mad:... Luckily both times it cut back on about 15 mins later and drove the car home. Weird part is that once the car sat it like reset and the EPC light disappeared and cars do not fix themselves, at least not yet. The second time I had a code reader and P0322 came up and I looked it up on this site and browsed this thread. Very helpful will update everyone should it be something else but I'll play it by ear.
 

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Thanks for the help 16706.P0322 & 16490.P0106

Just did this on a friend's 2005 Jetta 2.5. Same EPC and MIL that would disappear after sitting for a while. I think the failure is heat related as once the car cools down everything seems fine. Replaced sensor with Duralast from Autozone, $48 plus tax, LIFETIME WARRANTY (who does that!). Maybe 15 minutes for the project mostly jacking it up etc. My VAG V-checker gave me 16706.P0322 and 16490.P0106.
 

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In the morning I went to start my car and it’s started roughed and bogged really hard 3 times before I turned the car off. I let the car rest for a minute and then started it again and it started perfectly fine. I have a 2009 vw Jetta 2.5L. I drove to 2 places and the car started and drove fine. Then I was in a drive through and the car was idling and then it just died on me. I went to crank it and it just wouldn’t start up again. I did it 2 times but then on the third time i gave it gas and it finally started and the EPC light came on. I drove the car without letting go of the gas all the way home because I didn’t want to be stranded. I got home and parked the car. I started the car and it cranked and started again when I gave it some gas. At this point the check engine light turned on so I just let the car run to get all the codes read properly. The first code I got was P0322. I found this forum and went out and bought the crankcase sensor and replaced it. Took 45 min but then I went to start the car and it still cranks really long. Idle is fine ish. It idles 950-1000 rpm but usually it would at 700-800 rpm. The car seems fine when running but I don’t want to drive it anywhere. I have a screenshot of all my codes that it threw. Any help would be nice. I really would like to get this car back and running
 

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Thank you for this post! My 2.5l '07 automatic jetta was doing the same thing - 10 minutes of driving (until fully warmed up), then dies as soon as i come to a stop light, where the car needs to idle @ low RPM - it would die. The car would still crank up after ~7turns+ a little bit of gas.

This video is great at showing how to change the cable (
) . Unfortunately, I didn't have a place to do it myself, and ended up 1 hr of labor @ mechanic shop ($120) to get this 15 minute job done. Once done, the car started acting as it supposed to immediately. Even idles at the redlight @ .5k rpm, vs .8-1k prior to the fix.

P.S. If you have to drive it somewhere, once the engine is warm, and you have to come to a stop at the red light - hold break + gas to keep it above 1k rpm, this will keep the car from stalling.
P.P.S. It potentially took ~2 years for this sensor to go out. I think warning sign was engine starting after 3-4 turns. I replaced the battery, that didn't help. Once I replaced this sensor - the engine starts in 2 turns.
 

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It seems like most sensors start to die after the engine exceeds 100K miles. I've been replacing mine on my 2008 VW Rabbit 2.5 since I bought it over a year ago with 142K miles on it. It now has over 155K trouble free miles. I'm changing my crank position sensor during my next oil change. I think I've gotten all the ones with the bad reputation (hope I didn't just jinx myself.).
 

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An update on my repair: Even though replacing the sensor fixed the idling issue, my starter died a few weeks later. Once i started digging through that area of the engine, I noticed some oil pooled at the top of the engine (and, my car was leaking a little bit of oil over the years, but i didn't pay attention to it).
It turned out that vacuum pump gasket was failing, sending one drop of oil at a time down the engine, every few days. It looks like both the starter, and the crank position sensor are both below the vacuum pump! So potentially, the leaking gasket caused the crank position sensor to start malfunctioning, and for the starter to die. Keep an eye on any oil leaks in that area of the engine, and replace the gasket if you notice any leaking oil.
You can pick the gasket up for $40 on amazon, and its a very doable DIY, even for a novice like myself. Just follow the instructions online (note- articles online say that for automatic transmission, you have to move the transmission to get to the vacuum pump. However, there are a few videos online that show you how to replace the gasket, WITHOUT moving the tranny. I've done it. So can you). Once the vacuum pump gasket, and the starter were replaced, the car has been running like a champ.

In short, if your car leaks oil from that area, replace the vacuum pump gasket before you get stranded with a broken starter (or your car starts dying at red lights). Fortunately for me, the starter died while i was parked at home.
 

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An update on my repair: Even though replacing the sensor fixed the idling issue, my starter died a few weeks later. Once i started digging through that area of the engine, I noticed some oil pooled at the top of the engine (and, my car was leaking a little bit of oil over the years, but i didn't pay attention to it).
It turned out that vacuum pump gasket was failing, sending one drop of oil at a time down the engine, every few days. It looks like both the starter, and the crank position sensor are both below the vacuum pump! So potentially, the leaking gasket caused the crank position sensor to start malfunctioning, and for the starter to die. Keep an eye on any oil leaks in that area of the engine, and replace the gasket if you notice any leaking oil.
You can pick the gasket up for $40 on amazon, and its a very doable DIY, even for a novice like myself. Just follow the instructions online (note- articles online say that for automatic transmission, you have to move the transmission to get to the vacuum pump. However, there are a few videos online that show you how to replace the gasket, WITHOUT moving the tranny. I've done it. So can you). Once the vacuum pump gasket, and the starter were replaced, the car has been running like a champ.

In short, if your car leaks oil from that area, replace the vacuum pump gasket before you get stranded with a broken starter (or your car starts dying at red lights). Fortunately for me, the starter died while i was parked at home.
I agree. If you have a leaking vacuum pump, address the issue immediately! Note that replacing all 3 gaskets (front, back, o-ring on hose from brake booster) is a temporary fix. The gaskets may last 100K miles, but it is actually easier to just delete the vacuum pump and block the cavity with the IE Blocking Plate Kit and source the vacuum from the hose to the throttle body like I did. The vacuum pump is mechanically driven by the engine and drains some of the hp. Here is the link I followed:

Now, I have no leaks from the vacuum pump. The brake pedal and braking performance are exactly as before. It seems to me that this "German Engineering" took something simple and made it complicated. Very little vacuum is needed for the brake booster on this small car.
 
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