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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
the low oil level light did not come on and the low oil pressure light did? an oil pressure light from low oil means the pickup tube is no longer in the oil fun zone and your oil level light definetly would be on before that because safety meassures.
if you drove it that long with no oil it doesnt matter how good a company is your engine is damaged. main bearings need oil piston skirts sneed oil cam bearings need oil. your engine rattles now right. that is probably your pistons scoring the cylinder walls. go to a shop

also dieseling and runaway engines are the same meaning reffering to hot spots in the combustion chamber causing the engine to continue to run after ignition is off and impossible on fuel injected electronic ignition cars
But would it hurt to throw oil back in it and run it to see if that “noise” continues?
 

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But would it hurt to throw oil back in it and run it to see if that “noise” continues?
Nope, at this point you can do that.
Add oil, check dip stick, verify. Start.
Pray in the meantime...
 

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I'm not sure I'd attribute this to pushing items on Amazon... I think he was just showing which products he used.
That how I originally felt based on Op questions, response and actions taken after getting the oil low pressure warning.

Where are you seeing that it's a 2.0T? Since he put in 4.5 liters of oil, and is using the correct Mann filter for a 2.5, I'd assume that's what he's got. It would be nice if he'd specify that...
Based on that it has a DSG and Op used 4.5L of spec oil. which is 0.1l less than spec. The DSG R uses more oil and does not use that filter, but the 2.5l does use that filter and more oil but does not have a DSG.........2.0TFSI
 

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I did not realize I was supposed to pop that orange drain valve back closed. Tried pushing on it and it wouldn't fall back into place.
They make a tool just for draining the filter housing, yes it cost some money I got mine for $25, yes you can poke /push the seal with a small screw driver but why take the chance of damaging the seal / contact surface or forgetting to push it back in to place. The tool does not damage the seal and you are surely not going to forget to remove that tool hanging from the filter housing with a drain tube on it.
 

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EDIT:
I just went outside to double check the spot I did the service at and I could see a small dark circle. Grabbed some of the dirt/rocks and sure enough, smells like oil. I probably drove around 40 miles with 0 oil in it I'm pretty sure. So pissed at myself.

Can you please guide me on what I need to purchase to "maybe" fix it? Like the drain plug and stuff? This is the first time I've ever "worked" on my car and I'm super disappointed jesus....
Seriously doubt you dumped all the oil on the driveway and drove around 40 mile with no oil in the pan you would have seen warning signs shortly after starting the car up.
 

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the low oil level light did not come on and the low oil pressure light did? an oil pressure light from low oil means the pickup tube is no longer in the oil fun zone and your oil level light definetly would be on before that because safety meassures.
if you drove it that long with no oil it doesnt matter how good a company is your engine is damaged. main bearings need oil piston skirts sneed oil cam bearings need oil. your engine rattles now right. that is probably your pistons scoring the cylinder walls. go to a shop

also dieseling and runaway engines are the same meaning reffering to hot spots in the combustion chamber causing the engine to continue to run after ignition is off and impossible on fuel injected electronic ignition cars
NAR GTI do not have an oil level sensor just a pressure sensor.
 

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But would it hurt to throw oil back in it and run it to see if that “noise” continues?

Start over again with a new oil change and new filter, you can take a look at the oil for debris and look at filter. You can cut ends off and open it up to see if you see anything of interest. The nice thing about this type of filter is how easy it is to check them no need to cut the metal housing off to see what going on.

Make sure the seal is closed on the filter housing and the cap on and buy yourself the correct tool for future use if you keep the car. Make sure the O-ring tab is in correct position and you removed the old one, torque housing to spec with correct tool and also new drain plug to spec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
They make a tool just for draining the filter housing, yes it cost some money I got mine for $25, yes you can poke /push the seal with a small screw driver but why take the chance of damaging the seal / contact surface or forgetting to push it back in to place. The tool does not damage the seal and you are surely not going to forget to remove that tool hanging from the filter housing with a drain tube on it.
Do you happen to have a link or know what it’s called?
 

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Do you happen to have a link or know what it’s called?
These should work


Amazon.com: Auto part Oil Filter Drain Tool for VW Audi Equal to T40057 : Automotive


This has both tools for the housing https://www.amazon.com/JDT-Filter-2-0T-2-5L-Engine-Housing/dp/B088DB851K
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·

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So which path are you going to take............. add oil till dipstick shows full and start it up and hear how it sounds and then drain it or redo the oil change.
Yeah -- draining (if only to see if there's any oil left in the pan!), putting a new filter in, and replacing the drain plug again would be a smart move.

Third a safest option would be to just have the car towed the car to a good shop, and have them look at it...
 

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Yeah -- draining (if only to see if there's any oil left in the pan!), putting a new filter in, and replacing the drain plug again would be a smart move.

Third a safest option would be to just have the car towed the car to a good shop, and have them look at it...
What exactly are they going to do, start opening up the engine and look at all the moving parts that are protected by the oil? They most likely will just add oil back start it up and see what happens, or perhaps drop the oil pan see what if anything they find from that view and refill and start it.
 

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I would think a shop could indeed at least drop the oil pan and take a look inside. That should be a good indicator of catastrophic problem, no? And the engine wouldn't have to be run any more. Would an oil analysis be appropriate?

If not, then the solution would be, as you say, to drain what's left of the oil, change the filter again (and take a look at both), put a new plug in, and refill...

I'm not sure I'd know what to look for in the oil -- that is, how many sparklies makes it beyond hope. Achieved may, though...
 

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I would think a shop could indeed at least drop the oil pan and take a look inside. That should be a good indicator of catastrophic problem, no? And the engine wouldn't have to be run any more. Would an oil analysis be appropriate?

If not, then the solution would be, as you say, to drain what's left of the oil, change the filter again (and take a look at both), put a new plug in, and refill...

I'm not sure I'd know what to look for in the oil -- that is, how many sparklies makes it beyond hope. Achieved may, though...
Removing the pan would just give the shop access to the bottom end and you could have issues further up. Uoa shows the wear metals but you still would not know exactly from what location but it might give you an idea where to start looking.

Wear Metals
Aluminum: Pistons, bearings, cases (heads & blocks). Clutch assembly and transmission
components in motorcycles
Chromium: Rings, a trace element in steel
Iron: Cylinders, rotating shafts, the valve train, and any steel part sharing the oil. Transmission
shafts/gears and bearings in motorcycles
Copper: Brass or bronze parts, copper bushings, bearings, oil coolers
Lead: Bearings, leaded gas, fuel additives
Tin: Bearings, bronze parts, piston coating (rare)
Nickel: Trace element in steel, platings on some cylinder types
Silver: Bearings
Titanium: Some intake valves and connecting rods, aftermarket parts, oil additive
 

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Removing the pan would just give the shop access to the bottom end and you could have issues further up.
True, but wouldn't excessive and potentially-catastrophic (I hate using that word) damage farther up show up as shavings and crap in the oil pan?

Again, up to Achieved, as to how much time, money, and effort he wants to put into this. Hopefully he's got some considerations now...
 
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