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But the way, I always use 20w50, and not the 0w20 they suggest.
Point of order... VW recommended/recommends 5W-40, but required/requires oils with the VW 502.00 specification.

The oil that OP used is 5W-40.

The Mobil1 European Car Formula (meeting the VW 502.00 spec) I've used for both of our Mk5's for 14 years now is 0W-40. Not a hint of oil usage between changes.

But then we've always lived in the Norther Tier -- Maryland, Ohio, and now Colorado.

Where do you live?
 

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Point of order... VW recommended/recommends 5W-40, but required/requires oils with the VW 502.00 specification.

The oil that OP used is 5W-40.

The Mobil1 European Car Formula (meeting the VW 502.00 spec) I've used for both of our Mk5's for 14 years now is 0W-40. Not a hint of oil usage between changes.

But then we've always lived in the Norther Tier -- Maryland, Ohio, and now Colorado.

Where do you live?
Oil is oil and we all know why VW changed their oil specs.
It is because the thinner oil VW has switched to recommending, allows them to claim high gasoline mileage.
And that has cause premature failure of any place the oil is not under pressure, like chain slippers, camshaft lobes, etc.
The best way is to use better oil than VW is recommending, which is thicker viscosity, not 502.00 spec.
They are NOT recommending the best oil at all, but the oil with the highest mileage rating capability.
Nothing in the hardware has changed, so there is no good new reason for the new oil spec.
 

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Idiot reply!
You may not be familiar, but "bedazzled" refers to when bearing wear has started to leave little metal particles in the oil filter.
It is not an "idiot" reply.

In fact, it is very important that if the bearings are starting to wear, you immediately rebuild the engine with new bearings.
That way you avoid the expensive crankshaft re-grinding.
If the oil filter is "bedazzled" with bearing metal particles, stop driving it immediately.
It saves at least $500 to stop before you wear the crank.
 

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I have not read all of the posts.

If we assume the engine was fine before the oil change, as you say it was.
If we further assume that you did in fact put oil in the engine.
Then the two most likelyś are
The oil drain plug was not installed correctly or tight enough, allowing oil do leak at a good rate
The oil filter was not installed sufficiently tight enough, allowing oil to be pumped out of the engine.
Either of the above should be obvious upon careful inspection.
All that said, running the engine that long without oil has Very Likely RUINED the Engine.Rod and Main bearings cannot live without oil.

I am not familiar with this model VW. If you can remove the oil pan without much disassembly I would do that and at a minimum remove and inspect rod bearings. Shiny, unmarked, Good. Black, scored, Bad.

I bet lunch, the engine is done. Expensive life lesson. We humans sometimes screw up.

fat biker
 

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Oil is oil and we all know why VW changed their oil specs.
It is because the thinner oil VW has switched to recommending, allows them to claim high gasoline mileage.
And that has cause premature failure of any place the oil is not under pressure, like chain slippers, camshaft lobes, etc.
The best way is to use better oil than VW is recommending, which is thicker viscosity, not 502.00 spec.
They are NOT recommending the best oil at all, but the oil with the highest mileage rating capability.
Nothing in the hardware has changed, so there is no good new reason for the new oil spec.
Are you saying that VW spec 502.00 is low viscosity? Exactly what do you mean by, "use better oil than VW is recommending"? I honestly don't understand your comment, especially the part where you say, "Oil is oil".
.
My 2008 VW Rabbit 2.5 has always been fed VW spec 502.00 in various brands of full synthetic, including Castrol, Amsoil and Mobil1 - all in 5W/40 viscosity. With over 160K miles on the engine, it burns no oil between my 5K mile change intervals. I always use the VW recommended Mann oil filter as well. My outside temperature ranges from -20 degrees F in the winter to 100 degrees F in the summer.
 

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I have not read all of the posts.

Then the two most likelyś are
The oil drain plug was not installed correctly or tight enough
I think we established early-on that the cause of the oil loss was that OP forgot to pop the orange filter housing drain valve back into the closed position. That would cause oil to leak out through the housing. How fast under pressure, I don't know.
 

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we all know why VW changed their oil specs.
Well respectfully, we don't all know why. Are you referring to 502.00 as the "new oil spec"? As of 2005?

Please understand, what you're saying makes sense. If you understand more about this stuff than I do (which wouldn't be tough to do), by all means make your own choice. I mean that.

But for us lay-people, I think sticking with the recommended spec is the best choice.

Castrol, Amsoil and Mobil1 - all in 5W/40 viscosity.
Again not to put too-fine a point on it, but the Mobil1 ECF I've used for almost a decade and a half is 0W-40. :)
 

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True, but wouldn't excessive and potentially-catastrophic (I hate using that word) damage farther up show up as shavings and crap in the oil pan?

Again, up to Achieved, as to how much time, money, and effort he wants to put into this. Hopefully he's got some considerations now...
Yes but you still would not know from where exactly, would need a tear down or see in what area the any noises are coming from and go from there.
 

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Well respectfully, we don't all know why. Are you referring to 502.00 as the "new oil spec"? As of 2005?

Please understand, what you're saying makes sense. If you understand more about this stuff than I do (which wouldn't be tough to do), by all means make your own choice. I mean that.

But for us lay-people, I think sticking with the recommended spec is the best choice.



Again not to put too-fine a point on it, but the Mobil1 ECF I've used for almost a decade and a half is 0W-40. :)
No, I am saying that if you reduce the viscosity, then you have to increase the slipperiness of the oil.
That should be obvious.
If the viscosity is higher, then the thickness of any oil film will be greater.
And for a thinner film to not allow damage, is has to be slipperier.
And obviously thicker oils is cheaper, more reliable, and allows for more frequent changing, so is cleaner.

The mistaken rabbit hole VW is going down is more obvious is you look at the newer VW recommendations.
{...
Recommended Oil Viscosity: SAE 0W20 Recommended Oil Change Interval: 10,000 miles or once a year, whichever occurs first, only with VW 508 00 spec More Information
...}

The point is going thinner but with more expensive slippery agents, is a very expensive and dangerous route.
For example, the 2.5 used to never have chain slipper problems with the older oil specs.
With thinner viscosities, not they do.
 

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By myself yes. I've had a shop do it forever. It's at 125K miles.
Not to pile on here.
This serves as a good example of why when you are first getting your hands dirty servicing your car it is quite beneficial to have an experienced hand either showing you the way or following behind to check your work. As we see here, rookie mistakes can have nasty consequences.

The very first oil change I did when I was just a pup, my brother-in-law was there to make sure I did not screw it up. His words.

My brother-in-law taught me so much about life and working on cars. Still now, all these decades later when I come to a fork in the road or I am stumped I will stop and say out loud.. What would J.S. do?

He has passed now, when I see some of the hand tools he gave me, sitting in my tool box I remember him warmly.

fat biker
 

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Not to pile on here.
This serves as a good example of why when you are first getting your hands dirty servicing your car it is quite beneficial to have an experienced hand either showing you the way or following behind to check your work. As we see here, rookie mistakes can have nasty consequences.

The very first oil change I did when I was just a pup, my brother-in-law was there to make sure I did not screw it up. His words.

My brother-in-law taught me so much about life and working on cars. Still now, all these decades later when I come to a fork in the road or I am stumped I will stop and say out loud.. What would J.S. do?

He has passed now, when I see some of the hand tools he gave me, sitting in my tool box I remember him warmly.

fat biker
This reminds me of my youth in the 60's when I bought my first car, a used MG. My brother-in-law who was 11 years older than I was and a very experienced mechanic taught me how to do my own work and he made sure that I got my hands dirty. To this day, when there is a job I need done on any of my vehicles which is beyond my capability, I am not too proud to pay for a local friend who is the lead shop technician/mechanic at a dealership. He has been there for over 30 years and he is the one who gets sent off to school to learn the newest technology and returns to teach the rest of the mechanics. Fortunately, I am allowed in the service area and watch him work on my vehicles so that I can learn. I am more than willing to pay for this because not only do I get the job done right, I learn something every time.
He owned my Rabbit Mk 5 2.5 for 10 years before I bought it. I do the simple stuff and he does the complicated stuff. Although my Rabbit shows its age, it runs like brand new and has no mechanical issues of any kind. On the other hand, there are those little German gremlins in the electrical system.....
 

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Not to pile on here.
This serves as a good example of why when you are first getting your hands dirty servicing your car it is quite beneficial to have an experienced hand either showing you the way or following behind to check your work. As we see here, rookie mistakes can have nasty consequences.

The very first oil change I did when I was just a pup, my brother-in-law was there to make sure I did not screw it up. His words.

My brother-in-law taught me so much about life and working on cars. Still now, all these decades later when I come to a fork in the road or I am stumped I will stop and say out loud.. What would J.S. do?

He has passed now, when I see some of the hand tools he gave me, sitting in my tool box I remember him warmly.

fat biker
This reminds me of my youth in the 60's when I bought my first car, a used MG. My brother-in-law who was 11 years older than I was and a very experienced mechanic taught me how to do my own work and he made sure that I got my hands dirty. To this day, when there is a job I need done on any of my vehicles which is beyond my capability, I am not too proud to pay for a local friend who is the lead shop technician/mechanic at a dealership. He has been there for over 30 years and he is the one who gets sent off to school to learn the newest technology and returns to teach the rest of the mechanics. Fortunately, I am allowed in the service area and watch him work on my vehicles so that I can learn. I am more than willing to pay for this because not only do I get the job done right, I learn something every time.
He owned my Rabbit Mk 5 2.5 for 10 years before I bought it. I do the simple stuff and he does the complicated stuff. Although my Rabbit shows its age, it runs like brand new and has no mechanical issues of any kind. On the other hand, there are those little German gremlins in the electrical system.....
It is nice to have someone watching your back when doing work on your car for the first time but unfortunately that sometimes is not possible.

If op was looking at the Diy videos for how to do it some are just not complete in all details, just looked at 4 for the FSI oil change and three used the screw driver to the valve on filter housing, only one reset the valve after draining and the others no mention of resetting it. The one that did not use a screw driver just drained the filter without draining it and that was a Diy by a well known company for selling parts.
 

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I changed my oil and did a DSG service on my own Thursday. I used the below oil to do the changes for both:

Oil: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B076ZQ4KDK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_image_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
DSG: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01BGPR1HW/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_image_o04_s02?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I drove it on Friday perfectly fine and it was running great. Yesterday as I was driving it back to my house, as I was slowing down to a stop, I could hear a rattle. Knew it was weird just knowing my car, but didn't think much of it. A mile later, I got the Oil Pressure Low, STOP ENGINE warning. I had 3 miles left to my house and drove it there. Turned it on on Sunday and that rattle was still there. This has never happened and not too sure what I could have done by just changing the oil and DSG.
So Op what did you do refill and drive of again or ??
 

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OK, since it's been a week since OP has been back, I can continue on our hijack a bit more... :)

The mistaken rabbit hole VW is going down is more obvious is you look at the newer VW recommendations.
I'm confused. Do you regard the VW 502.00 (5W-40 or 0W-40), that VW recommended for the Mk5's, to be "newer?" Or just the VW 508.00 (0W-20)?

If what you say about why and how VW is changing their specs is true (and I'm sure it is), it's hard to blame them. They're under serious pressure to conform to CAFE mileage requirements (however one might feel about them), and this is one of the things they're doing.

If I had a newer VW (or when I get one), I'm not sure I'd be brave enough to deviate from their current recommendation...
 
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