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Some folks swap in Cabby stuff which eliminates that hideous, boat anchor mounting system and York compressor. I've seen a few threads recently specific to your topic. Try a search for YORK in this Mk1 sub-forum...
 

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78rabbit1.5LGP & 82rabbitpickup1.6DGC
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90amp alt were from later cabriolet you can swap most of those parts and bracket over
just rewire the end with new copper lugs and crimps.

you really...really dont need more than 90 amps for a basically stock system

if you want more there are 110amp which require serpentine belt swapping


stock: 45amp, 55amp, 65amp (max) [1974-1984]
90amp were later mk1 chassis

also note: the 90amp are much larger and heavier than the 55/65amps
 

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The '85 GTI had a 90 A which bolted onto my Mk1 engine setup just fine, it hung on the bracket under the york compressor.

Kudos for the creativity to go electric A/C compressor. The ability to run the A/C with the car not running is one of the best features of my e-Golf. (don't even bother to look this way, the compressor in an e-Golf is 100% weird and not suited for grafting into some other engine bay).
 

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1983 GTI
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Show us your car with a few pics!
Hoffa- she is getting a new fuel pump, so not very appealing.
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Plant

However, everything is stock, and no rust. It lived 37 years in the CA desert and driven by original owner. The interior is thrashed from sun and heat, but oh well.
 

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Will do. You wouldn't have any info on high output alternators? I am not finding anything for an MK1 GTI.
High output alternator not recommended.
Your fuse block is slightly under rated as it is.
Not good to run more amps through it.

But apparently no need.
The Tesla AC is not a high amp draw.
{...
From the Model 3 manual: " The power socket is suitable for accessories requiring up to 12A continuous draw (16A peak) ". The compressor from Tesla is rated 12A. It's made for a standard 15A Cigarette lighter socket which is what is in the Tesla and two prior Vehicles which all worked fine.
...}
 

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The '85 GTI had a 90 A which bolted onto my Mk1 engine setup just fine, it hung on the bracket under the york compressor.

Kudos for the creativity to go electric A/C compressor. The ability to run the A/C with the car not running is one of the best features of my e-Golf. (don't even bother to look this way, the compressor in an e-Golf is 100% weird and not suited for grafting into some other engine bay).

Why not suitable for grafting?
If electric, it would seem to not be belt related, so could be put anywhere, even under the dash.
 

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The alternator supplies only what the system needs. Basically, if it does not have system voltage [around 13.5v] then it will supply enough current/amps till it does.

There is no good reason to have an alternator produce more amps than what the entire car sees, but there are several advantages of having a high amp alternator. Once of them is idle current. Alternators do not produce a lot of current at idle. If you are in rush hour, in my area, you could have the wipers on fast, headlights on, rear defogger on, heated seats, blower on max, with the A/C on [for the defroster] and not to mention all the power being consumed for the engine to run.

There is a good possibility that the battery would die out since there is no way the alternator will produce the current needed to supply all that stuff at idle. Of course, some of you live in a place where rush hour is 60mph, so none of this would apply. Just sharing there are reasons why a higher alternator is a good thing.

Not certain what the factory fuse box is capable of, but I would assume that if you add up all the fuse in the front, the Germans would make it capable of that. No, I am not sticking up for the engineers, I feel the power supply wires to the fuse box are way too small to run all the consumers at the same time. I believe this is the main reason why those connectors are melted and the fuse box is ruined. That and water. I think the Germans thought the odds of someone in the PNW turning on all the consumers at the same time are slim.
 

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If electric, it would seem to not be belt related, so could be put anywhere, even under the dash.
These 12v compressors are interesting…. I was looking at them a few weeks ago. I saw the compressor and condenser mounted under the trunk of a A1 Jetta. Or maybe only the condenser was underneath and the compressor was in the trunk… regardless, it really opens the possibilities.

-Todd
 

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I had an 85 Jetta GLI and know your pain. MK1 engine bays are a tad busy for some folks today but I loved their simplicity. But, back to topic, the alternator is "sized" to the car, amps-wise. You can seriously overpower the (now) flimsy wiring harness/fuse block with too much juice. You basically have two loads on the alternator: "required" and "hotel". "Hotel" is an old Navy term (and I am an old attack sub Vet besides a VW owner for the last 35+ years). By "hotel" I mean "it's nice to have" but not required. On MK1's those hotel loads are: heater/ac blower, headlights, radio, dash and interior lights, horn, and possibly a retrofitted seat warmer. I could be missing some stuff... Even the AC clutch is "hotel", it's not required to run the car. The "required" loads on the alternator are to supply the battery for charging, the starter, the ignition system, brake lights, and the fuel pump. These old cars didn't have electric windows, electronic displays, high end stereo amps, electronic fuel injectors, digital climate controls, satellite up-link, etc. so you really only need to run an alternator that was rated for car, that is unless you are adding a heavy electric load somehow. These old motors run between 90-105 HP at the crank so rolling a big alternator is going to hurt your passing power, fuel economy, and butt-to-the-seat dyno numbers. I had a 60's era GM with a 35 amp alternator, stock. The current VW alternators are over 100 amps, some going as high as 140? Holy crap have loads been piled on.... It's not hard to replace components inside an alternator if yours is acting up, bearings and diodes and whatnot. If you really hate the stock boat anchor alternator you could take apart the shells, give them a good cleaning, and hit them with some paint. My oldest current car is now only 22 years old (sold off my old fav's...sigh) and I found this stuff great for under-hood restoration over the years: Eastwood Aluma Blast Paint Aerosol 12 oz
 

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I am always amazed what the automotive industry is doing to increase the MPG on vehicles.

The A/C compressor still must push the refrigerant around and I have no idea how much HP it would take to do that. I do believe that a 12v source to make that HP would take a lot of amps. If I recall, Derek's set up was very minimal, I believe his first version was too small so he had to install a larger compressor. He lives in the Vancouver BC area which has identical weather as the Seattle area. I highly doubt if his 12v compressor would work where many of you live.
 

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I am always amazed what the automotive industry is doing to increase the MPG on vehicles.

The A/C compressor still much push the refrigerant around and I have no idea how much HP it would take to do that. I do believe that a 12v source to make that HP would take a lot of amps. If I recall, Derek's set up was very minimal, I believe his first version was too small so he had to install a larger compressor. He lives in the Vancouver BC area which has identical weather as the Seattle area. I highly doubt if his 12v compressor would work where many of you live.
I think the typical 36cc/rev 400V compressors used in EVs are ~7.9kW. That’s a lot of current at 12V

Edit: Not sure if these are available retail but they’re a potential solution…just no cooling power on 12V it seams. I’ve used these at 360V on BMW i3 batteries and they are alright but the mfg. requires a certain amount of airflow, so trunk mounting might take some ducting.

 

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I had an 85 Jetta GLI and know your pain. MK1 engine bays are a tad busy for some folks today but I loved their simplicity. But, back to topic, the alternator is "sized" to the car, amps-wise. You can seriously overpower the (now) flimsy wiring harness/fuse block with too much juice.
I'll bet that you also recommend never charging an iPhone with an iPad charger "cuz it'll burn up the battery".

Kirchoff's Current Law applies: the electrical demand is the electrical demand. Regardless of how much current the alternator CAN provide, it will still only deliver whatever the system demand is.
 
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