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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently purchased a 2006 Jetta with 129k miles. The car sat outside for the last 4-5 years. I got in running and once it got warm the transmission shifted hard into 2nd, 3rd and reverse. I drained the transmission pan of fluid and refilled with approximately a quart of fluid and a quart of transmission conditioner. That made tremendous improvements! But, after it’s warm, I still get unusual hard shifts into 2nd, 3rd, and reverse. Sometimes it’s so hard that it barks the tires.

I know there are a lot of other posts on this and I realize every case is different. Because this is a common issue I'd like to hear of others experience.

Should I replace the valve body? Is it easy to replace for a DIY'er? Or should I just do a transmission service with new filter?
 

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2011 Jetta Sportwagen S 2.5L; 2021 Hyundai KONA SEL
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I typically try to stay away from making general statements or uneducated guesses, but when it comes to VAG vehicles I have the overall impression that most of the 1st owners keep the cars until the warranty expires or until they incur (warranty being expired) an expensive repair at the dealership, so they trade in the cars. Another category is represented by cars operated by rental companies. I do believe that most of the cars in these two categories are definitely neglected when it comes to transmission fluid change...
Subsequently, they get traded at "dealer" auctions and exchange hands with subsequent second, third, fourth owners that have no idea how to care about these cars.
Of course there are more than likely also plenty examples of a one-owner vehicles with the owner being a die hard VAG buff and keeps the vehicle until a very respectable "age" and mileage (like our own Dr.Ger) and takes really good care of it in terms of all maintenance - which includes changing the transmission fluid at recommended time or even much earlier and more often than prescribed.
Again, this is my own impression and I might be completely off kilter and totally wrong, but definitely I see lots of VAG vehicles neglected.
Changing the transmission fluid and filter (at least once) is one of the very first things I do when I buy a new (to me) VAG vehicle.
I do believe that in order for the valve body to become "warped" - so it needs replaced - it would have to be a huge amount of metal shavings that somehow get trapped between the valves and the walls, and the fluid gets so caked up from burning that prevents the solenoids from sliding to move the valves.
Actually you can learn pretty much everything you want to know by reading the Aisin 09G manual. It is pretty simple to replace the valve body, but I would start with a cheaper alternative as you have no idea if you have a bad valve body.
I would definitely start by servicing the transmission... If needed be, then you can always replace the solenoids which is three times less expensive than replacing the whole valve body.
Good luck with whatever you decide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I typically try to stay away from making general statements or uneducated guesses, but when it comes to VAG vehicles I have the overall impression that most of the 1st owners keep the cars until the warranty expires or until they incur (warranty being expired) an expensive repair at the dealership, so they trade in the cars. Another category is represented by cars operated by rental companies. I do believe that most of the cars in these two categories are definitely neglected when it comes to transmission fluid change...
Subsequently, they get traded at "dealer" auctions and exchange hands with subsequent second, third, fourth owners that have no idea how to care about these cars.
Of course there are more than likely also plenty examples of a one-owner vehicles with the owner being a die hard VAG buff and keeps the vehicle until a very respectable "age" and mileage (like our own Dr.Ger) and takes really good care of it in terms of all maintenance - which includes changing the transmission fluid at recommended time or even much earlier and more often than prescribed.
Again, this is my own impression and I might be completely off kilter and totally wrong, but definitely I see lots of VAG vehicles neglected.
Changing the transmission fluid and filter (at least once) is one of the very first things I do when I buy a new (to me) VAG vehicle.
I do believe that in order for the valve body to become "warped" - so it needs replaced - it would have to be a huge amount of metal shavings that somehow get trapped between the valves and the walls, and the fluid gets so caked up from burning that prevents the solenoids from sliding to move the valves.
Actually you can learn pretty much everything you want to know by reading the Aisin 09G manual. It is pretty simple to replace the valve body, but I would start with a cheaper alternative as you have no idea if you have a bad valve body.
I would definitely start by servicing the transmission... If needed be, then you can always replace the solenoids which is three times less expensive than replacing the whole valve body.
Good luck with whatever you decide.
THANKS for your input. The Aisin link was very informative. Changing the solenoids and not the entire valve body was something that I hadn’t considered. Thanks
 

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2011 Jetta Sportwagen S 2.5L; 2021 Hyundai KONA SEL
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BTW, as I haven't asked - did you have a chance to scan the transmission module?
Maybe you have a permanent trouble code that would give you a good clue as to what the problem might be.
 
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