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2008 VW Jetta SE
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at purchasing the NEUSPEED air in take for my MKV Jetta, does anyone have any pros/cons of it? Or maybe better CAIs to buy? Price isn’t hugely my main concern but I’d like to stick around the same price as the NEUSPEED one.
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2008 VW Jetta SE
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Seems many people aren’t a huge fan of them, I get they’re mostly for more noise but I mainly wanted to improve anything atleast a bit and hopefully give more flow to my cat back exhaust, but mainly the get rid of the HORRIBLE engine cover. Man do I hate that thing, it’s such a pain to take off in my opinion.

Back to the main topic, I’ll give this thread some time and Hopfully generate more eyes and brains but then in a week or so I’ll give it a purchase and make a forum about it!
 

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Make sure you get the right one for your car depending on if it has a MAF or not. I don't have anything against the neuspeed cold air intake besides it won't make much of a difference over stock. If you want a cheap and fun mod it will probably be good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Make sure you get the right one for your car depending on if it has a MAF or not. I don't have anything against the neuspeed cold air intake besides it won't make much of a difference over stock. If you want a cheap and fun mod it will probably be good.
Sweet thanks! I mostly want the engine cover gone haha!
 

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After-market air intake discussions always fascinate me - or maybe better said, I don't understand their general popularity or why anyone decides to spend hard-earned money in that area. OK, they probably make more noise (cool, I get that) and might be necessary if you have also done major engine modifications which result in the car "using more air" (bigger displacement or turbos).

But my skeptical thinking goes like this:
  1. If factory engineers could get "more horsepower" by simply bolting on a different plastic box and air filter - you can bet they would have done it - it would be "free" with no difference in vehicle cost!! I can't imagine any low hanging fruit in that area of engine development which could be exploited by some low-tech aftermarket supplier with an injection molding machine.
  2. Next - you almost never see any technical discussion on how well those after-market air filters clean the air!! Other than oil, I can't think of another consumable that can so drastically affect long term engine life.
  3. Even worse - many such filters require regular and careful maintenance - cleaning & oiling the filter element in an exact manner. Something the "average" vehicle owner is unlikely to do on a regular basis.
  4. And even when an occasional article is published, it rarely compares the filtering ability (versus stock OEM) at 5, 10, or 15,000 miles, where that aftermarket filter may be doing almost no "filtering" at all.
So unless someone can show me good reasons why I should re-engineer my GTI air intake system, I'll just continue to buy high quality OEM replacement elements and change them on an accelerated maintenance schedule.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
After-market air intake discussions always fascinate me - or maybe better said, I don't understand their general popularity or why anyone decides to spend hard-earned money in that area. OK, they probably make more noise (cool, I get that) and might be necessary if you have also done major engine modifications which result in the car "using more air" (bigger displacement or turbos).

But my skeptical thinking goes like this:
  1. If factory engineers could get "more horsepower" by simply bolting on a different plastic box and air filter - you can bet they would have done it - it would be "free" with no difference in vehicle cost!! I can't imagine any low hanging fruit in that area of engine development which could be exploited by some low-tech aftermarket supplier with an injection molding machine.
  2. Next - you almost never see any technical discussion on how well those after-market air filters clean the air!! Other than oil, I can't think of another consumable that can so drastically affect long term engine life.
  3. Even worse - many such filters require regular and careful maintenance - cleaning & oiling the filter element in an exact manner. Something the "average" vehicle owner is unlikely to do on a regular basis.
  4. And even when an occasional article is published, it rarely compares the filtering ability (versus stock OEM) at 5, 10, or 15,000 miles, where that aftermarket filter may be doing almost no "filtering" at all.
So unless someone can show me good reasons why I should re-engineer my GTI air intake system, I'll just continue to buy high quality OEM replacement elements and change them on an accelerated maintenance schedule.
Yeah I get your reasoning for the response and it seems a lot of people are in the same boat as you, my thing is I’m a kid without any bills to pay and I make good enough money at my job to spend it ‘without worry’ (not a flex once so ever just part of my reasons) but asides that I mainly want to get rid of the gross engine cover and I can’t really do that without a CAI, I enjoy the way they look and sound whether or not they actually improve anything at all (which I know they really don’t provide a lot of anything)
Thanks for your response and getting your point across without being mean!
 

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After-market air intake discussions always fascinate me - or maybe better said, I don't understand their general popularity or why anyone decides to spend hard-earned money in that area. OK, they probably make more noise (cool, I get that) and might be necessary if you have also done major engine modifications which result in the car "using more air" (bigger displacement or turbos).

But my skeptical thinking goes like this:
  1. If factory engineers could get "more horsepower" by simply bolting on a different plastic box and air filter - you can bet they would have done it - it would be "free" with no difference in vehicle cost!! I can't imagine any low hanging fruit in that area of engine development which could be exploited by some low-tech aftermarket supplier with an injection molding machine.
  2. Next - you almost never see any technical discussion on how well those after-market air filters clean the air!! Other than oil, I can't think of another consumable that can so drastically affect long term engine life.
  3. Even worse - many such filters require regular and careful maintenance - cleaning & oiling the filter element in an exact manner. Something the "average" vehicle owner is unlikely to do on a regular basis.
  4. And even when an occasional article is published, it rarely compares the filtering ability (versus stock OEM) at 5, 10, or 15,000 miles, where that aftermarket filter may be doing almost no "filtering" at all.
So unless someone can show me good reasons why I should re-engineer my GTI air intake system, I'll just continue to buy high quality OEM replacement elements and change them on an accelerated maintenance schedule.
1) This logic has been disputed by many vehicle engineers, it’s not that aftermarket intakes don’t add anything to the vehicles, it’s that the engineers are NOT allowed to add CAI to most production cars, trust the engineers, they are all a bunch of kids at heart, just like us, and they want to hear the beautiful sounds of a 5cyl growl, or a turbo engine spin up, it’s just that the USA has a lot of laws about “performance” that can’t happen from factory unless it’s a special package, in which the car manufacturer pays a huge cost.

2) There are plenty of studies, both short and long term, relating to fuel consumption, cleanliness of the filter material, and “cool gains brohan”

3) Please do NOT use the oil, and good shake out, and if you life in a dusty area maybe a hose down with regular water every 6 months and allowed to air dry will do the trick. The oil clogs the system, gets on the MAF/MAP and caused all sorts of funky actions, it also reduces efficiency … which is the reason people buy them … for efficiency.

4) while the filters do an excellent job of filtering, most people buy these intakes for the sweet sweet engine notes.
 

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1) This logic has been disputed by many vehicle engineers, it’s not that aftermarket intakes don’t add anything to the vehicles, it’s that the engineers are NOT allowed to add CAI to most production cars, trust the engineers, they are all a bunch of kids at heart, just like us, and they want to hear the beautiful sounds of a 5cyl growl, or a turbo engine spin up, it’s just that the USA has a lot of laws about “performance” that can’t happen from factory unless it’s a special package, in which the car manufacturer pays a huge cost.
What laws, these mk5 have a "Cai" they take it from the front on the grille area.
 

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What laws, these mk5 have a "Cai" they take it from the front on the grille area.
A law that states that vehicles sold in America cannot come equipped with an intake that reduces flow in temperatures. You can thank commifornia and their creation of the California Air Resource Board (C.A.R.B). In order to sell a CAI, they have to pass certain requirements in order to sell, and since commifornia is corrupt beyond measure, it is extremely hard for a car manufacturer to get this certification, without shelling out lots of money (lobbying) which is why car manufacturers hardly ever do it.

Also, do you know what separates a CAI from a regular boxed intake? Just because it pulls from the front (this a logic based idea) does not make it a CAI.
 

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Wouldn't having an aftermarket intake like the neuspeed result in greater temperatures than the stock setup?

The way I see it, stock forces cool air into the intake by using a sealed duct against the front grill. The neuspeed intake will draw some air in but it is mostly just sucking in air from the grill and just generally warmer air from the engine compartment.

Long story short it would be interesting to log intake temp on a car using the stock vs aftermarket Cai of this style.
 

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Wouldn't having an aftermarket intake like the neuspeed result in greater temperatures than the stock setup?

The way I see it, stock forces cool air into the intake by using a sealed duct against the front grill. The neuspeed intake will draw some air in but it is mostly just sucking in air from the grill and just generally warmer air from the engine compartment.

Long story short it would be interesting to log intake temp on a car using the stock vs aftermarket Cai of this style.

Yes it would and it has been done before, should be a post somewhere around here.
 

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So what is a CAI?
Wouldn't having an aftermarket intake like the neuspeed result in greater temperatures than the stock setup?

The way I see it, stock forces cool air into the intake by using a sealed duct against the front grill. The neuspeed intake will draw some air in but it is mostly just sucking in air from the grill and just generally warmer air from the engine compartment.

Long story short it would be interesting to log intake temp on a car using the stock vs aftermarket Cai of this style.

The CAI is not about WHERE the air is coming from, ALL intakes pull air from the front of the car (again, this is logic based) however, the materials used for the plumbing are what helps to cool the engine down, hence why a lot of aftermarket companies use silicone, or a certain type of aluminum, which helps reduce temperatures of the air.

You are never going to get a true to life cold intake, however reducing the ambient temperatures going into the engine by a few degrees drastically changes the dynamics.

The only way to get a truly cold air intake is by adding a meth kit or somehow strapping bags of ice to the intake plumbing to keep the material cool, which cools down the air flowing in it.

Most brands use a cheap plastic, that does not nothing to cool the air down, the only thing that cools the air down at that point is the vacuum pull, which reduces by probably less than a degree, if any at all.
 
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