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Discussion Starter #1
Purpose:
So I finally got around to making this DIY. I had been wanting to install a catch can for awhile because of the mechanical and aesthetic benefits of my engine. If you don't already know an oil catch can will "catch" the oil vapor that is released through your PCV system and condense the vapor in the can so that you don't recirculate nasty oil sludge back into your intake tract. The PCV system runs on a continuous vacuum loop so it is important to keep the system sealed as well. This is why I chose to run a recirculated catch can vs. a breather-style catch can which is also popular in the aftermarket tuning scene.
I bought my Megan Racing catch can from an ebay seller outside of an auction for $40 shipped. It was a really good deal that I could not pass up. The Megan Racing can is basically a replica of the popular greddy design without the greddy logo laser etched into the face of the can. Here is what it looked like when I received it:

The first thing I noticed when taking it out of the box was the nicely polished finished that was as good as I expected it to be. The can is basically just a cast aluminum box. Some cans are cut from billet aluminum but I pretty much expect mine to be cast for $40 dollars. The more expensive cans can go all the way up to $130 for a similar design, but I opted for the Megan Racing can solely based upon cost/benefit. You can buy the Megan Racing catch can at a lot of online vendors because Megan Racing distributes their products to a lot of wholesalers. There is a forum sponsor by the name of Farina Motorsports that carries a lot of Megan Racing products so I would probably contact them first if you wanted to try and get the same can.
I have compiled this DIY to help other texers complete this easy/cheap/useful mod. I wish I knew about this when I bought my car 3 years ago because I would have done it way back then. I, however, am not responsible for any mishaps, inury, or death resulting from you attempting this DIY

Procedure:
1. First I took the can out of the box and evaluated all of the hardware on it. I noticed there was an additional nipple on the bottom of the can that was probably intended to be used as a drain valve. I am running my system closed loop so I didn't want to leave that nipple on there and cause a vacuum leak. The first step was to remove the nipple with a crescent wrench.




2. Next I took the can out to my car and opened the hood to decide where I wanted to position it. I took some advice from another user: yell0wsn0 and I decided to put the can over by the driver's side fender near the battery. I had a lot of space over there since I am only using a filter strapped to my MAF. I did this so I could get a good idea of the bracket that I wanted to make to secure the can in the bay.


3. On the front of the can there are 2 pretapped holes for mounting a bracket on the can. Now that I had a good idea of how to make my bracket I went shopping. The first stop was the local Ace Hardware Motorsports.


I picked up 1 allen head bolt to fill the hole where I removed the vacuum nipple earler. I also picked up 2 identical allen head bolts for the pretapped bracket holes on the front side of the can. Here is a pic of the 3 bolts loosely tightened on the can:


In addition to the 3 allen head bolts I picked up a 1/8" thick by 3/4" wide strip of sheet aluminum to make the bracket with. The piece I bought was 4 feet long but you really only need 8.5 inches as you will see later. The aluminum:
Finally I bought 2 Hex cap bolts and a washer for each that you will later use to bolt the bracket to a piece of plastic in the engine bay. The bolts are 1/2" Head x 1 inch long.

4. The next stop was Home Depot Racing
. I needed to pick up 2 plastic hose reducers from the plumbing department. They are 5/8" to 1/2" nylon reducing barb splicers. Made by the Watts company part number A-479 and $1.33 a piece. I also grabbed a few stainless steel hose clamps for clamping 5/8" and 1/2" hose.<<<This is optional. You can get hose clamps anywhere but I wanted stainless steel ones from Home Depot Racing.



5. The final stop was Advance Auto Parts for some heater hose. I purchased 2 feet of 5/8" and 2 feet of 1/2" heater hose. The hose is $1.28 per foot. 2 feet of each size was plenty because I wanted to make sure I had excess so I could later cut it perfectly down to size. Here is a pic of everything I bought on the shopping trip:

6. Once I got back I went straight to work. I torqued down the allen cap bolt that is in place of the nipple I removed earlier. Then I measured the length I would need to make the bracket from the strip of aluminum and then cut the strip of aluminum down to size. I cut 8.5 inches from the end of the strip to make the bracket. I used a dremel but you can use a hacksaw or sawzall as well. Then I deburred the end that I just cut with my dremel.




7. After deburring, I measured 5 inches from one end of my piece of aluminum and made a mark. Then I put the strip in a vise and proceeded to bend the aluminum by hand into a 90 degree angle. The bend should be where you make the mark at 5 inches.


8. Next I lined up the now bent bracket on the catch can so I could make some marks for the holes that I needed to drill to mount the bracket to the can. After marking the holes, proceed to drill them out. I started with a smaller bit at first, but finished with a 1/4" bit for the final holes. I deburred the area around the holes with a dremel afterwards.


9. Mount the bracket to the can and make sure the holes line up correctly. I put a chrome washer that I purchased earlier between the bracket and the can so the can would not get scratched by the bracket even after torqueing the allen head bolts.


10. Take the can out to the car and look at where the bottom part of the bracket sits on the mounting surface. Mark the bracket again for an additional 2 holes where you want the final position of the can to be. Drill another 2 holes, again starting with a smaller bit at first, then working your way up. I finished the bottom holes with a 3/8" bit. Deburr the holes again with a dremel or file.


11. After the holes are drilled, again take the can out to the car. Make marks where the 2 mounting holes will be drilled through the plastic shroud. This shroud covers your big ground wires. You may have to open the shroud and shift the wires to the passenger's side 1/2" to create more clearance for drilling the holes. I had to do this in order to avoid touching the wires. Drill 2 holes in the plastic using a 1/4" or 5/16" bit. Be very gentle to avoid touching any wires. The plastic is thin enough the bit should eat right through it. The wires in the shroud are wrapped in insulation, but this is no excuse to be lazy and not slide them to the left to avoid mangling them.



12. After the mounting holes have been drilled you can now mount the can in the bay. Use the 2 large bolts and washers that you bought earlier to screw the bracket into the plastic shroud. **An option here would be to take the bracket off of the can before screwing it down for the final time and sand it down to make the aluminum have a brushed appearance. Or you could paint the bracket as well. I chose to do neither in the interest of time but I will remove the bracket later to sand it smooth**


13. Now it is time to start tearing apart the stock PCV system. First remove the 2 one time use clamps from the PCV valve. There is one on the top and one on the borrom of the valve just like your diverter valves on a 1.8t. Then remove the PCV valve itself from the turbo inlet pipe. You can clean the valve off at this time.



14. Remove the one time use clamp from the metal hose next to the valve cover. Then remove the rubber PCV hose connecting the metal hose to the PCV valve. Notice the gunk stuck inside the hose. This would be the time to ask yourself "Do I really want to be shooting this crap back into my intake?" NO!



15. Take the PCV valve and reinsert it into the turbo inlet pipe, but this time face it towards the catch can. Clamp it in place with a new hose clamp.


16. Now is the time to modify the 5/8" heater hose before installing it. Take the 2 feet of 5/8" heater hose and cut it in half into halves of equal length. Now take a dremel with a regular sanding bit on it. You will have to enlarge the opening in one end of each hose so that they can slide over the PCV valve and the metal pipe next to the valve cover. Enlarge the opening for about an inch from the end of each hose so they can easily slide on.

17. Take one 5/8" hose and slide it over the metal pipe next to the valve cover. Clamp it down with a hose clamp. Then take the other 5/8" hose and slide it over the PCV valve and again clamp it down with a hose clamp.




18. Take the 2 hoses and bring them together. Cut the hose coming from the metal pipe so it is even length with the hose coming from the PCV valve. Take out the 2 plastic barbs from their packages. Insert the larger end into the 5/8" heater hose and clamp it with a hose clamp. Do the same for the other hose.



19. Take the 1/2" Heater hose and cut it into 2 parts of equal length. Slide each hose over a nipple on the catch can and clamp them down with 1 hose clamp each.

20. Line each 1/2" hose up with the other end of the plastic barb and cut it to the proper length so it can slide easily all the way up the plastic barb. Do this for both hoses and clamp both of them down with a hose clamp.


21. Strap the hoses together with zip ties as you see fit. Sit back and enjoy your hard work. http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif




Modified by formerly silveratljetta at 7:17 PM 5-21-2007

Modified by formerly silveratljetta at 12:18 AM 5-22-2007


Modified by formerly silveratljetta at 12:20 AM 5-22-2007
 

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ok so does putting a catch can on mean u can blow up ur turbo and not put ur oil back into the intake or are u just going for never putting ur inake back on? i donno **** i put one one a 240 with a sr20det red top in a 240 haqs no clue what it did
 

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Re: (xile18t)

looks good, i have the same can.... i bought mine for $35
but i attached mine to the battery box ( don't ask, i'll post pics one day)
but in this pic..the stock hose you just attached this one too...its going to blow up...especially at this length, mine did
and it was solid/hard, not soft..
it just blew up
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Re: (gtifella2)

Quote, originally posted by gtifella2 »
ok so does putting a catch can on mean u can blow up ur turbo and not put ur oil back into the intake or are u just going for never putting ur inake back on? i donno **** i put one one a 240 with a sr20det red top in a 240 haqs no clue what it did

It catches oil vapors that escape. I don't know what your friend was talking about. If you blow your turbo you are still going to be ****ed. http://****************.com/smile/emthdown.gif
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Re: (Bora_Azul)

Quote, originally posted by Bora_Azul »
also what year is your motor?
how come you didn't add a hose to the crank case?

I have a 2000 AWD engine code. The reason I didnt add one to the crank case is because that fat rubber hose coming off the crankcase goes down into a T section with the metal pipe that I ran the new hose off of. I ran it just like the factory did. Later on I will get some AN fittings from [email protected] and just run a t-fitting off of the crank case. But since the AN fittings that I would need are about 3x the cost of the catch can I am going to wait a little while.
 

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Re: (formerly silveratljetta)

oh..i believe your pcv system is a little different than my AWW...mine was easy and straightforward
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Re: (Bora_Azul)

Quote, originally posted by Bora_Azul »
oh..i believe your pcv system is a little different than my AWW...mine was easy and straightforward

yah. AWW and AWP's have that 80 dollar hose on top of the valve cover that always rips. My hose was ripped also but I think the AWD hoses aren't 80 bucks but id rather do this anyways. http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif
 

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Is there any need for something like this on a 2.0 or a VR6?
 

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Re:

Very nice writeup http://****************.com/smile/emthup.gif this will be good when I get around to mine
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Re: (dremhmrk2)

Quote, originally posted by dremhmrk2 »
Is there any need for something like this on a 2.0 or a VR6?

not as much. They are most beneficial on turbo cars, but I don't think it could hurt. And for about $55 total I couldn't refuse.
 

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Re: (Bora_Azul)

Quote, originally posted by Bora_Azul »
oh..i believe your pcv system is a little different than my AWW...mine was easy and straightforward

Actually I think installing an oil catch can on AWD engines is a lot simpler and cleaner. You don't need a T connector because all you're doing is replacing one hose (crankcase to intake) with two (crankcase to oil catch, oil catch to intake).
I already figured out how to install mine, but I just haven't gotten around to buying it yet

OP: Have you tried opening up the oil catch to see what it's like inside? If you do, snap some pictures of it! Also, while it's open, you can stuff some coarse steel wool in there to help trap the oil vapours.


Modified by bootymac at 9:48 PM 5-21-2007
 
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