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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It ain't perfect, but I was lucky to get this one in 2001 for $1600 when living in Denver.

It's been up on blocks or shuffling along in poor repair for the last 5 years. Just got it back together. I plan to keep the body stock since I started with a decent car. I like the wear & tear of the original paint, etc.

In the past I autox'd it some. Intend to race next month.

I was lucky to have bought a suspension off of Kevin Wenzel back in about 2003. It is off one of his old cars. It is a Big Front Bar setup. Delrin bushings all around (offset ones in front for more camber), Ground Control Coilovers & Camber plates set for max camber & caster, 500# rear springs with no sway bar, big Neuspeed front sway bar with 350# springs.

Also, Heavy duty engine mounts, poly rack bushing, stainless braided brake lines (all new tubing as well), my old Mustang 5.0 Ram Air, Scirocco lower air box, Neuspeed throttle body, ported intake manifold, dual outlet Mk2 cast iron header, TT dual downpipe, TT 2" exhaust, short shift kit with weighted bar,

Lots of maintenance: New head gasket, oil pan gasket, rubber valve cover gasket, new gas tank, and a @%^#$ load of every other part imaginable to get 'er back to square.

I plan to fix just a few things appearance wise that really bug me but the rest will stay stock: Fixing the dent in the passenger door, the missing GTI stripes on the driver side (car had been dinged on rear driver side in the 80's), and I have a good set of Red GTI seats I got off a vortexer that I plan to recover my seats with. Other than that it will stay stock. Engine may change this winter... depends on how many banks I can rob.













A picture of how I rigged up my prepump filter (filter is off of an Audi 4000)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also front upper tower brace & lower frame brace & rear upper tower brace. Looking at the picture, I guess I have 375# springs in front!
 

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Looking good! :peace:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I like it :thumbup: What size are those RPF1's? I've been contemplating whether or not I want a set and these look good!
The RPF1's are 15x7 with 35mm offset. This fits for me cause of my coilovers, so as you know, it depends on your suspension setup behind the wheels clearance wise. I currently have an old set of 205/50/15 Falken Azenis on. Looking to go to Rivals or the Hankook R-S3v2's. Might try 225/45/15 if I go with the Rivals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No I didn't eliminate the accumulator. The pre filter is between the tank and the fuel pump. Looking at the picture, the braided hose comes out of the tank and does a 180 turn as it first goes behind then in front of the fuel pump. Then thru the pre filter, then the black rubber hose does a 270 turn into the pump. In order to do this, I had to shim the mount of the pump so the pump sits lower so the braided hose had space to loop in front of the pump.

I did this because years ago I had a hose clamp pop off - one of the ones in the rear passenger wheel well. I lived on a dirt road, and by the time I figured out the problem, I had a bunch of dirt in the tank. Ultimately I replaced the tank & added the pre filter, but not after burning up a couple of pumps. Luckily I was buddies with the parts guy in Colorado Springs who'd get me new pumps as warranty replacement!

Since, I've cleaned or replaced the filter when I change the oil.
 

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78rabbit1.5LGP & 82rabbitpickup1.6DGC
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i really like the filter hose routing

guess i need to find some braided hose and re-route mine like yours!
this is a much better location IMO and easier to work on than mine


pre pump filter adds a good measure of reliability to cleaning the fuel before it hits the pump

we also know the in tank filter has a rubber baffle below it which deteriorates thus eliminating the filter entirely
if it were not for this flaw then the intank filter would be all you need
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You are right. I had the pre pump filter on before I got a new tank. One of the things I found in the filter was little pieces of thin rotted rubber. That was what pushed me over the edge to get a new tank. Between the filter & new tank - things have been good since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I believe they are. It has been about 10 years since I installed them so I'm a bit hazy, but I believe that the philosophy I was told was to mount them 90 degrees of normal so that you can get as much positive caster as possible. I believe the idea is that the more positive caster for a VW Mk1, the more negative camber as the shock is compressed. So, since between the camber plates & the lobed bolts on the bottom of the strut- both allow for negative camber, there is enough there (I know I can get 3.5 degrees negative camber, possibly more) that you turn the plates 90 degrees to get more positive caster to help out your dynamic negative camber.

I will have to spend some time going back and looking thru the old yahoo vw group that I used to subscribe to where I got all the setup info from to confirm what I just said, but off the top of my head I believe that was the reason. It was one of the main tenants of the Big Front Bar set up guys.
 

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Hi

I think its a good idea a filter before the tank , but if the filter is clogged because of contaminated gas or rust inside the tank ,the pump will fail when the gas dont pass to the pump right? I love CIS system i have a 77 rocco cis and a rabbit GTI 84 ,the olnly think i hate are those fuel pumps ,very expensive pumps and remanufactured pumps doesnt last.

Regards


No I didn't eliminate the accumulator. The pre filter is between the tank and the fuel pump. Looking at the picture, the braided hose comes out of the tank and does a 180 turn as it first goes behind then in front of the fuel pump. Then thru the pre filter, then the black rubber hose does a 270 turn into the pump. In order to do this, I had to shim the mount of the pump so the pump sits lower so the braided hose had space to loop in front of the pump.

I did this because years ago I had a hose clamp pop off - one of the ones in the rear passenger wheel well. I lived on a dirt road, and by the time I figured out the problem, I had a bunch of dirt in the tank. Ultimately I replaced the tank & added the pre filter, but not after burning up a couple of pumps. Luckily I was buddies with the parts guy in Colorado Springs who'd get me new pumps as warranty replacement!

Since, I've cleaned or replaced the filter when I change the oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
When I first put the filter in, I changed the filter (or cleaned it... since the filter I have is relatively clear so I can see inside to see if there's debris) within the first 100 miles, and then again every couple hundred miles till I was sure I was flowing basically clean gas without debris. Then I knew I wasn't dealing with the starvation issue at the pump that you're talking about. Since then I've checked in more or less every oil change and I'm good to go. My point is that yes I know that you can burn up those pumps if they are starved for fuel cause from what I heard they are cooled (or maybe it's lubricated?) by the gas that passes thru them so it's important that you don't have a restriction.

It's easy for me to clean the filter or replace. I just put a vise grip on the braided hose just upstream of the filter to clamp off the flow, undo the hose clamps at the filter and pop the filter off. It's literally a 20-30 minute job max. The longest time was spent cleaning the filter since I didn't buy a new filter every time. To check for debris in the filter, I also dumped all the contents from both sides of the filter screening into a totally clean container. I'd then flow clean gas thru the filter and dump into the same container again but I'd even shake it with fingers covering the inlet & outlet to remove any extra debris.

Bottom line, once you start knowing you are flowing clean gas, you should be confident your good to go.
 

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Thanks

I will do the same with mi mk1 s regards

Regards


When I first put the filter in, I changed the filter (or cleaned it... since the filter I have is relatively clear so I can see inside to see if there's debris) within the first 100 miles, and then again every couple hundred miles till I was sure I was flowing basically clean gas without debris. Then I knew I wasn't dealing with the starvation issue at the pump that you're talking about. Since then I've checked in more or less every oil change and I'm good to go. My point is that yes I know that you can burn up those pumps if they are starved for fuel cause from what I heard they are cooled (or maybe it's lubricated?) by the gas that passes thru them so it's important that you don't have a restriction.

It's easy for me to clean the filter or replace. I just put a vise grip on the braided hose just upstream of the filter to clamp off the flow, undo the hose clamps at the filter and pop the filter off. It's literally a 20-30 minute job max. The longest time was spent cleaning the filter since I didn't buy a new filter every time. To check for debris in the filter, I also dumped all the contents from both sides of the filter screening into a totally clean container. I'd then flow clean gas thru the filter and dump into the same container again but I'd even shake it with fingers covering the inlet & outlet to remove any extra debris.

Bottom line, once you start knowing you are flowing clean gas, you should be confident your good to go.
 
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