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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
August 24, 2021

I threw a low dollar bid out on a Copart listing last week totally not expecting that I'd win it... but I did. Copart fees along with having to rent a Uhaul to bring it home basically doubled the price that I paid for it, but I'm pretty excited about it. I've been eyeballing MK1 TT's for almost a year now.

This TT is in really good shape, while simultaneously being in terrible shape. Carfax shows it was a New England car until around 2012 (I haven't found any rust yet (fingers crossed), when someone in Oklahoma bought it. I'm 98% sure that the majority of its time in OK was just spent sitting and baking in the sun. Tires are all date coded for the end of 2011. The clear coat is decimated. Headliner and driver's door card glue have given up on life - the headliner is annoying, but the door card is problematic as it catches on the window when it is being rolled up, and the glue is smearing off onto everything. All the vacuum/rubber hoses under the hood are crusty and cracked too.

The auction listing said that it started and idled when it arrived (I'm having some doubts on this), but I think it sat for so long with a dead battery that it forgot the key, so I can't start it because the immobilizer is active. I have a VCDS and the cluster shows that zero keys are currently programed. Everything that I've read tells me that obtaining the SKC will be tricky, but that I can get a $25 cable off of Amazon to pull the Hex code from the cluster - security code will be in there. I'm still researching this. In my multiple scans with VCDS, I did check the Service Interval. Only 240 miles since the last service.... but that was 1265-ish days ago (3.5 years). I can't hear the fuel pump prime when I key on... so that's problematic, as well. My impression of immobilizer problems was that the car would start, but turn off after one second. Luckily, I do have an AEM High Flow pump that I just pulled out of one of my other cars - so if need be, I have a pump available.

The car is about 95% stock though. It still has all of the underhood plastic covers (Coolant/PS cover, Engine Cover, and Battery Cover), although the little screws are all missing. Konig wheels with keyed lug nuts/bolts (and I can't find the key), a Farenheit head unit that sticks out a couple inches, and a brand new looking aftermarket power steering cooler mounted in front of the radiator/condenser. I'm excited to get started screwing around with it though. Most pictures and info to come.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
August 26, 2021

Gave the TT a quick bath after work, poked around the engine bay looking for issues, and did a little bit of light work here and there. She cleaned up better than I expected.







I pulled the driver's side door card off since it was falling apart and getting a yellowish grease or glue everywhere. A lot of the plastic along the top that connects it or holds it to the door with the seals was broken as well. I also pulled out the head unit, as the row of buttons above it had been pushed into the dash. Plus, the head unit was sticking out a couple inches and looked really stupid. I don't want to go through the hassle of replacing it and rewiring everything behind it (who ever did it before left a mess of wires), so I'll have to think about my approach. I think they had left it sitting out because it has a screen that folds out and pops up - I don't care about that, so I might just stick it in all the way this time.



The only pressing matter that I saw under the hood is that the vacuum line that runs into the FPR had crumbled at the FPR. I didn't mess with it too much; just made a mental note of it. When keying the car on, I still don't hear the fuel pump. I'll investigate that further this weekend. I have a high-flow AEM that I just took out of my Cobalt. Might try to put that in the car this weekend. No idea how long the gas has been in the tank, so I might try to suck out as much of that as I can with a syphon and then pour in some fresh stuff. I'm sure the fuel filter needs changed, as well. Beyond that... I need to pull one a timing belt cover off and give it an inspection. I have no idea how long it has been on the car or if it is in just as bad of shape as a lot of the other rubber components.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Steve @ ZinkWerks reprogrammed the key to the cluster - no more flashing immobilizer light! It still won't start though; pretty sure the fuel pump is dead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It still won't start though; pretty sure the fuel pump is dead.
August 28, 2021

I knew my mission going into the day - pull the fuel pump housing and swap in the AEM High Flow Pump that I recently pulled from my big turbo Cobalt SS. This should be fairly straightforward and easy.

Narrator: "It was not."

Knowing it was going to be a scorcher of a day, I moved the car around my concrete pad and got it under the car port - blocking the sun would end up making things soooo much more tolerable.



I started off by pulling off the hot-side turbo pipe to give myself room to pull the timing belt inspection cover. The belt looks good - no visible cracking - it's probably still early in its life. I think I'm still a little too nervous about it to leave it in for too long though. BUT, I have other issues to tackle. Since it's a bit of a tight fit and I want to clean the interior anyway, I decided to start by pulling the seats out of the car.



Set the girlfriend up with a vacuum and put her to work cleaning the floors up. Meanwhile, I cleaned up the rear bench area a bit (pulling out the speaker wiring that was just lying around - obviously someone had subs in this car and apparently just cut them out when they sold the car), before diving into pulling the fuel pump housing. Sigh.

Once I started pulling the housing out of the tank, the damage was immediately evident.







I've never seen a tank unit this bad before. The clear-ish fuel lines crumbled like a stale cookie... even the lightest of pressures/forces would cause them to break even more. The insulation on the wiring was non-existent in most places and rapidly deteriorating in other places. The wires themselves easily fell apart in some spots (the wiring for the connector that ran from this pump housing to the housing on the other side of the tank had already fallen apart and was just lying on the bottom of the tank). Surprisingly though, the black fuel line that runs from one pump housing to the other was still 100% intact and seems perfectly fine.

My guess is that the tank just sat for a really long time without much fuel in it and that allowed the plastics and wiring to dry out and begin degrading. That's my best guess, because the tank in my MK2 sat for 5 years without use just before I bought it, but everything was fine when I pulled it - I put gas in it and it functioned perfectly fine until I eventually swapped it out for the better MK3 unit. Similarly, my Cobalt recently sat unused for almost 3 years with half a tank of gas or so in it... again, it was in perfect working condition after I drained it and refilled it.

Sooooo, I'm eyeballing picking up a used tank from someone or maybe just cleaning this tank out and then making a custom fuel pump housing assembly - maybe pieced together from the old pieces. I'm not sure which way I'm going to go with it though.

ANYWAY. I used a giant fluid extracting syringe tool to pull most of the gas out of the tank - will need to do this again to get the last gallon or so out of the passenger side half if I plan to reuse it. I then capped it off and got to work cleaning up the interior of the car. The five buttons on the dash would pop backwards into the dash when pressed, and I couldn't seen to get the flap that secures them properly closed through the radio opening... so I just pulled the dash and center console apart.



It's a surprisingly simple car to work on. It took a little while to get everything apart since I was taking my time to make sure none of the fragile plastic bits broke, but I got there. Messed around with the button housing a bit and was able to clearly see how it functioned, which allowed me to make the needed adjustment so that it would snap back together and hold the buttons steady. I then pulled the aftermarket stereo wiring adapter out of the car and cleaned it up a bit. You can see the small rats nest of colored wires in the above picture. I basically took all of the wires that weren't attached to anything, twisted them together into a single wiring harness strand, and then zip-tied them together. I then did the same thing for all the wires that had known connections.

While the interior was torn out and I was working to fix these things, my girlfriend was working on cleaning up all the parts and pieces. So the coke that someone spilled in the car 10 years ago is no longer coating the insides of the center console, lol. I buttoned everything back together and was really happy with the outcome. The only things that the interior still needs are a good steam cleaning for the carpet, door cards fixed/replaced (material is peeling away from the top; driver's side is terrible and the plastics underneath are broken - basically going to need to be replaced), and then the headliner needs fixed/replaced. I was trying to think about custom headliners that I could do - if this was a GTI, I'd obviously do a tartan pattern. The floorboards need the steam cleaning because it's fairly obvious that someone spilled something dark on the carpet behind the front seats... might be more of the coke that I found in, on, and under the center console.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
September 6, 2021

I'd almost say that I regret going to the swap option... the Quattro tanks are not simple to pull out. 😂 Not when compared to something like a MK2 GTI, at least. Pretty sure I could have my GTI's tank out of the car in 10 minutes or less. I'm already a couple hours deep into pulling the TT Quattro tank - BUT, I've been taking my time to make sure I don't break anything else, while also exploring the underside of the car.





Pulling off the exhaust was easy, as was the heat shielding (and it made it obvious that someone has been under here before, since they used self-taping screws to reattach the front of the heat shielding that goes between the exhaust and propshaft. Sigh. Knowing this, I looked around a little bit more. Didn't see too many things that screamed modifications... until I started looking at the catalytic converter pipes, lol.



I'm not totally sure what happened here. The bolts going through the flanges do not appear to have nuts on the end of them... they almost appear to have been welded on. Also, the piping in front of the cats being welded makes me think that they were cut... which makes me question if there's anything in the cats anymore. The hacks left a decent amount of welding wire still on the pipes too. Definitely not a professional job, lol.

Getting back to the tank and rear subframe... it took me quite a while to get the propshaft separated from the rear diff. Once I figured out what was still holding it together, it was simple... it just took me a while to get to that realization (I'm talking about the alignment pins that are part of the giant rubber mount - they were stuck in the rear diff). It took me a while to disconnect all the fuel lines by the fuel filter, as well - again, not wanting to break anything and compound my problems. I disconnected the rear shocks and then removed the rear subframe bolts and lowered it down, using the control arms and CV axles to hold it up. Not wanting to drop the rear subframe completely will likely complicate the rest of the process for me... but there are a couple things that didn't want to have to do - like disconnect the hard brake lines (because I'm 99% sure they wouldn't survive).



I removed all the bolts holding the tank in and it started to come down. Something on the passenger side seems to be holding it up, but once I got to that point, the Mosquito Militia was taking flight and they've been especially bad this year, so I packed up and called it a day. I'm hoping that when I return to work on it, that I can get the tank out relatively simply. I might try removing the control arms from the subframe, but want to make sure that will work for me. Part of my problem is that I cannot remove the wheels and tires from the car. The key to the wheel locks is MIA, so I need to figure something out for that.



They look like a pretty simple pattern... fingers crossed that maybe that'll help me to find a generic key to remove them? If you have any ideas, definitely let me know. They're really tight in the holes on the wheels, so hammering on a socket might not work - I know I've seen that as something others have done for stuck on locks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Went to Auto Zone on Friday and checked their lug nut inventory. They had one key - sold by itself - from White Knight Wheels or something like that. Either way, the good news is that it fit! Pretty sure I was the first one to remove the wheels in like 10 years, because they were hardcore seized. I got them all off though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
September 19, 2021

Made myself spend another couple hours working on the getting the tank out of the car and I finally was successful. If I had to do it again, I could probably finish the entire job in just a couple hours, but oh well. I wasted a lot of time by trying to save myself from wasting time on unnecessary work. 😂 Funny how that works. I did a lot of "trying to get it out by unbolting the least amount of things" before asking myself why I'm not just ripping everything out of the car... I didn't have a good answer, so I switched to "remove everything mode" and it made things simpler.

Disconnect both ends of the propshaft. Disconnect the rear control arms from the swing arm/hub - at a minimum, you should remove the uppers. Unbolt the rear axles. Pull the whole rear subframe out of the car - be mindful of the grounding strap and the two vacuum hoses attached to the rear differential.

Once it was out, I sprayed the tank off with my pressure washer, then soaked the inside with some Purple Power, and then sprayed out the inside as best as I could. I ended up removing quite a bit of gunk stains from the inside. I'm debating on just spending the $5-600 needed to put new OEM assemblies in this tank, rather than spending the time pulling a used tank. Time vs money. After the tank was done, I sprayed off the rear subframe and differential. Need to make sure that I do a Haldex service while the unit is out of the car and easily accessible.



After that, I put the car back on a Battery Tender and poked around the engine bay for a handful of minutes. I definitely need at least one new vacuum hose for the FPR. The one that leads to the Combi valve is crumbling as well... but I'll most likely delete that, so why both replacing that hose?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
October 10, 2021

New fuel pumps came in, along with a timing belt kit, aluminum thermostat housing kit, and a few miscellaneous other things. Been super busy the last month and have a handful of very busy weeks ahead of me, as well... like closing on a house this Friday, which actually means that I need to have this car moving under its own power by the end of the month (or sooner, in all reality).

Finally some cooler weather here and it was aided by strong winds, so I put a full days work into the engine bay. I started by pulling out a bunch of the stuff that doesn't need to be in the engine bay anymore - SAI, EVAP, N249, etc. The power steering cooler pipe must have been leaking previously, as there's an aftermarket cooler on the car, so I went ahead and pulled that off the car, as well. I might have gone a little overboard with my deletes, completely forgetting that to pass a Texas "inspection", I can't have a CEL. 😂 I'll cross that bridge when I get there, I suppose. With that said, I did later remember that I had a Delete Kit with all the resistors that came with the Jetta that I used to 1.8T swap my MK2 GTI, so I raided that and used those on the TT. I ended up pulling the SAI block off plate off of the GTI, as well.



After pulling a lot of the junk out of the car, I started doing a timing belt swap. Everything was pretty standard and straight forward, didn't really run into any snags. I did prep myself for the mess that is unplugging the back side of the power steering reservoir... only for nothing to leak out, lol. Not great. I've got some CHF 11S lying around, so I'll top it off when I'm done. I'm not sure how long the timing belt had been in there, but it looked relatively new as the text on the backside was still legible. There was a metal impeller water pump in the car too. I put that aside, along with the belt and tensioner pulley, and might use them again later on down the road. Good backups to have handy for my track car GTI. I won't reuse the hydraulic tensioner though. It looked newer and in good shape, but that's the biggest risk in the group, imo.



Reinstalling everything was easy enough. Pulled the coilpacks and spark plugs to make the engine easier to turn over and check the timing marks after the belt install. Everything lined up well after a handful of turns so I buttoned the car back up on that side. Grabbed the new coolant bottle from my GTI and the Black MQB Tiguan coolant reservoir cap (2Q0121321A).

Threw new plugs in it (NGK BKR7E; I like that 3 of my cars run these now... makes life simple), hit the valve cover with the ShopVac (it was a mess of leaves, seeds, and broken wire loom), pulled the air box out of the car to give me easier access to the SAI/Combi valve, and pulled the thermostat housing and thermostat. I wouldn't mind sending the previous owners / mechanics of this car a strongly worded letter.



I almost stripped the top Combi valve bolt - my allen just didn't want to sit in it all the way and it was seized up fairly tight, so I had to pull the coolant flange off the side of the head in order to access it with sturdier tools. Once again, finding issues. That coolant flange had been pulled off before... the o-ring they stuffed in it was too big (it's ID was what should have the OD) and they slathered it up with RTV. So I cleaned that up a bit and added it to my parts list. Buttoned that car back together and called it a day around 6.30 pm before the mosquitos got too bad.



Still left to do:
  • Install fuel pumps
  • Install fuel tank
  • Drain and fill Haldex and rear differential (Haldex fluid + MT-90)
  • Install rear subframe
  • Drain and fill 02M (MT-90)
  • Drain and fill engine oil
  • Fill coolant system
  • Plug open vacuum ports (EVAP system)
  • Run vacuum lines to FPR and DV
Ordered the following the vacuum hose, MT-90, Haldex Gear Oil, VW/Audi G13, and URO Aluminum Coolant hose flange w/ new sensor UroTuning this morning. Have a new set of vacuum caps on the way from Amazon, as well (from High Temp Masking Supply). The car should be ready to start up then. Fingers crossed. Pending no issues, it should happen this weekend at the latest. If that goes well enough, then I'll have a laundry list of other parts that the car needs (new suspension, bushings, axles, end links, tie rods, etc).
 

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The "delete" resistors will not solve your CEL issues. Without SAI you're going to have a CEL and without EVAP you're going to have another CEL... even with resistors.
I have a tune but the tuner company says it is now against EPA regulations to code out certain CEL's. So I'm going to just go in and remove the LED from the dashpod circuit board.
You left one EVAP pipe connected to your intake manifold ;).
Are you going to remove the EVAP vacuum pump under the passenger-side wheel well also? And the charcoal canister in the rear?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
October 17, 2021

Was on a bit of a mission yesterday, so I didn't really take pictures or document a lot of what I did. Started by running and cutting vacuum line for the FPR and the DV; each on their own dedicated line now. I then drained and filled the rear differential and transmission with MT-90, drained and filled the engine oil, and changed the oil filter. Cleaned up a little bit of the mess under the car - wiped the oil pan off and a few other things. The underside of the car is still quite dirty though. I'm partially wondering if someone rallied this car. 😂

Moved on to getting the new fuel pump housings secured in the tank. This was surprisingly a royal PITA. I had done this on my MK2/3 tank before and it didn't take but a minute. The TT tank was a solid 15 minute procedure with someone helping me. They pushed down as I used an interior trim tool to run around the outside of the gaskets to get them to tuck inside the opening. Once that was done, started to get the tank back into the car.



It took a lot of adjusting, but I finally got it in. I think one of the EVAP lines ended up getting pinched, but I wasn't too worried about it, so I just moved on. I might regret that eventually. 😂 Mounted the new fuel filter and connected the lines. The outlet hose didn't want to snap on so I hit it and its button with a little WD-40 just to see if that was the issue... seems like it might have been. I'll be sure to check/watch that connection after I prime the system.

Next was the rear differential. Quite the PITA to do alone, but I managed to get it in. Spoiler alert... I should have mounted the propshaft before bolting in the rear subframe. I scraped out as much of the old axle grease as I could and then added in some new stuff. Mounted the axles and then struggled to get the rear arms reattached for a while, but ended up successful. Do these cars come from the factory with spherical bearings in the rear hubs for the arms to attach to? Because mine has them... I wouldn't expect that to be a factory part, but it didn't look obviously aftermarket like a lot of parts usually do.



The propshaft was next and it was a royal PITA. Basically had to unbolt the rear subframe onto a jack and then pull with all my might while my GF slipped it on. Getting it back together from there wasn't too much trouble though. With everything was together, I threw the heat shields back on, and then the exhaust.



There's still a couple bolts here and there that I need to hit with a torque wrench (axle to rear diff connection, prop shaft, and the rear subframe), but there isn't much else left. I need to put some gas in the tank, swap out the OE plastic coolant housing (the one with the temp sensor) once the new one arrives (it was supposed to arrive the 14th... but for some reason, it's in Kansas City right now. Maybe the put it on the wrong truck?). Oh, and re-drain and refill the Haldex. I tried doing it while I had the rear subframe out, but without the vent on the top to let air out, it became explosively problematic to fill it like that, so I ended up having a lot of fluid blow out from the pressurization. SO I ordered another tube and will just swap the fluid again. I'm not sure how much fluid I lost before and I don't want to short the system.

Essentially, once that Coolant Flange arrives, I can get that thrown on, fill the cooling system, put some gas in it, and attempt to start. Fingers crossed that everything goes smoothly. Once that is done, there are a definite handful of things that I know will need corrected immediately. Both front axles have torn boots and it needs tires - I didn't want to invest in those items before knowing whether or not the car would even run and not have any other major issues. I'm going to try to see if I can get the wheels and tires off of my MK2 GTI to work on the TT, but I'm confident that the spokes won't clear the brake caliper. I did see a VW in the junk yard a couple weeks ago that had some thick spacers on it, but the spacers were mounted with the factory VW lug nut lock - searched the trunk of that car and couldn't find the key. I have two MK4 keys in my garage; no guarantee that either of them will work though... but I might go try.

Still left to do:
  • Install fuel pumps
  • Install fuel tank
  • Drain and fill Haldex and rear differential (Haldex fluid + MT-90)
  • Install rear subframe
  • Drain and fill 02M (MT-90)
  • Drain and fill engine oil
  • Fill coolant system (waiting on coolant flange)
  • Plug open vacuum ports (EVAP system)
  • Run vacuum lines to FPR and DV

The "delete" resistors will not solve your CEL issues. Without SAI you're going to have a CEL and without EVAP you're going to have another CEL... even with resistors.
I have a tune but the tuner company says it is now against EPA regulations to code out certain CEL's. So I'm going to just go in and remove the LED from the dashpod circuit board.
You left one EVAP pipe connected to your intake manifold ;).
Are you going to remove the EVAP vacuum pump under the passenger-side wheel well also? And the charcoal canister in the rear?
I had seen people mention that you would still end up with CEL's for some of those. I'll have to figure that out as I go, I guess.

Is the other EVAP line linked to the line coming off the passenger side of the Intake Manifold? Of the two still on the manifold, I just figured one was for the crankcase ventilation and the other was brake booster, so I didn't even trace them back.

And I was unaware of the EVAP pump in the wheel wheel. I knew the MK4's had the "blue balls" there, but hadn't really seen anything specific to removing these items on a TT. I'll likely eventually go in and remove it then. I reinstalled the charcoal canister for now; simply so that if I needed to reattach some of these things to pass an inspection, I could.

Does Maestro have the ability to turn on/off CEL's? It's so much easier with my Cobalt as I have nearly complete control over its tune with HPTuners - their support list doesn't extend to the 1.8T's though.
 

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Here is an EVAP diagram from my Bentley manual. Item 3 is the vacuum pump under the passenger-side wheel arch, which i deposited into the trash. EVAP lines run from the purge-valve/vac-canister and tee off to the TIP and intake manifold.

Font Schematic Parallel Book Engineering


Maestro has the "ability" to remove CEL's and maybe they do. All I know is that my tuner (Motoza) says they are not allowed to do it anymore!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Awesome, thanks. I still have the car up on jack stands, so I might as well pull the EVAP vacuum pump out of the car, as well as that other set of vacuum lines.

Since the engine has an Audi logo, I assume that's the TT specific Bentley? I used to have the MK4 Bentley, but it got water damaged quite severely and my Ex threw it away. I've been debating picking up another.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
October 24, 2021

I had the coolant flange to fix the car all last week, but kept putting it off to do other things. Spent Saturday helping a friend/coworker replace the cold-side charge pipe on his 2017 M2. Very common for the plastic piece that slips over the throttle body to blow apart under boost... and that's exactly what happened to his.

So, I was determined to finish the TT on Sunday. Got to work installing the URO coolant flange with a new green top sensor. Fairly quick and easy work - getting the rear coolant hose off is a bit of a PITA because it bumps right up against the TIP. The new one fit like a glove though. Put all the clamps on, reinstalled the airbox. Removed a couple more useless vacuum lines (thanks for pointing them out tt92103) and capped their connections. Filled the cooling system (I only managed to get about 3L in before it was "full". I didn't measure what I previously drained though). Changed the Haldex fluid. Pondered existence. And then ran to AutoZone to buy a fuel container, a Lucas fuel injector treatment, 5 gal/20L of 93 oct from Shell, returned home, and poured it into the tank. I tried fitting one of the 15" Rota Slipstreams off of my MK2 on the car, but it wouldn't clear the front caliper. Damn. So I stick the wheels and tires that it came with back on the car.

Checked over everything one last time. And attempted to start it. Nothing. Well, it cranked and cranked and cranked. But never started.

Keyed off... then back on and listened again to see if I could hear the fuel pump. Nope. Checked the fuse. Busted. Replaced the fuse and tried again. Can now hear the fuel pump!

Try to start. It cranked and cranked and cranked and THEN STUMBLED and cranked and cranked.

Try again. Crank and crank... and FIRED! The flex pipe on the downpipe is apparently decimated, because it almost sounds like it is running open downpipe. Do a bunch of visual checks while it's idling like making sure none of the fuel lines are leaking and making sure the coolant isn't disappearing. No obvious leaks. Hop in, clutch in, throw it in first, and slowly let the clutch out until it starts to edge forward. Move it forward a car length, get back out and do another visual check. Everything looks good.

So I get back in and take it for a spin around the neighborhood. Runs and drives well. Shifter is smooth as butter. Turn it off and check for leaks and levels. Everything is looking good. Take it for another spin a little bit further away. Car drives surprisingly well for how neglected it appears to have been. But once you get to about 40-45 mph, you can feel an unbalance in the drivetrain - I'm guessing/hoping that it's the wheels/tire. The wheels have a couple noticeable dings/bends in them, so I really don't want to put new tires on them, but that might end up being what I do.

Eyeballing downpipes too. The CTS is like 20-25% off right now... might just spring for that.

 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You are definitely bringing this thing back to life, nice work!
Thanks! I'm going to try to really clean this thing up.

New Yokohama Advan Apex tires, an eBay downpipe, and front axles (both had cracked inner boots) are on the way. I went with a $99 eBay downpipe because a well known local said he has put three of them on three different TT225's. I guess we'll see how that works out, lol. My experience with cheap parts is that they almost always fit like ****.
 
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