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Discussion Starter #1
Figured this would be the best place to post as most if not all of you guys have gone through a home purchase.

- When looking for a home did you filter out a certain heating type (Oil/Gas/Etc) or was that not a major buying factor?


The reason I ask is that I am just kicking off my next flip project and it currently has an oil furnace with forced air. With this project we are having the gas company run a gas line to the house because it's super inexpensive and we figure it will be an added bonus to the house. However the furnace in the house is a relatively new top of the line Bryant model running on oil. So I'm trying to debate if the $5-$7k it will cost to put the new furnace in is worth it to attract buyers or turn some buyers away?

Any input is greatly appreciated.
 

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I prefer gas and would convert over to it if I bought a house with oil. I say leave the newish system and make sure the gas company sizes the line for a gas conversion.
 

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is oil heating common the area? if it's common, I probably wouldn't be swayed, but I prefer natural gas.

oil heating is really uncommon in the midwest, so when I was looking for a house my criteria was "had to have natural gas heat." I didn't want to deal with propane refills or the cost of electric. unfortunately, I had to replace my furnace a month into ownership, but I've been well pleased with the replacement Lennox natural gas furnace.
 

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Figured this would be the best place to post as most if not all of you guys have gone through a home purchase.- When looking for a home did you filter out a certain heating type (Oil/Gas/Etc) or was that not a major buying factor?Any input is greatly appreciated.
as mentioned, go with what's common and available in your area. We have gas, and with our seasons, I would prefer gas over electric.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
is oil heating common the area? if it's common, I probably wouldn't be swayed, but I prefer natural gas.

oil heating is really uncommon in the midwest, so when I was looking for a house my criteria was "had to have natural gas heat." I didn't want to deal with propane refills or the cost of electric. unfortunately, I had to replace my furnace a month into ownership, but I've been well pleased with the replacement Lennox natural gas furnace.
It's split to be honest, a lot of homes have oil and a lot of gas in this particular area. Heck we had oil when we bought and then moved to gas 3 years later.

I think we are going to leave the oil furnace but have the gas line run and manifold installed and run the stove and water heater on gas and go from there. Hard to justify swapping out an almost brand new heater for fuel type at this point.
 

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Figured this would be the best place to post as most if not all of you guys have gone through a home purchase.

- When looking for a home did you filter out a certain heating type (Oil/Gas/Etc) or was that not a major buying factor?


The reason I ask is that I am just kicking off my next flip project and it currently has an oil furnace with forced air. With this project we are having the gas company run a gas line to the house because it's super inexpensive and we figure it will be an added bonus to the house. However the furnace in the house is a relatively new top of the line Bryant model running on oil. So I'm trying to debate if the $5-$7k it will cost to put the new furnace in is worth it to attract buyers or turn some buyers away?

Any input is greatly appreciated.
Heres the big questions:

*Where is the oil tank and whats its condition

*What part of the country is the house located

*whats the total project budget.

*what else is involved in the flip

No matter what my initial thought is to rip it out, but answer these first and that will give me a better idea.

EVERYONE is moving away from oil, and Natural gas is significantly cheaper, so there are good reasons to move towards gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
*Where is the oil tank and whats its condition - Outside - in good condition (not buried)

*What part of the country is the house located - North East - Valley Forge, PA

*whats the total project budget. ~$125,000

*what else is involved in the flip - everything, kitchen, bath, roof, siding, etc

The house is almost 4k sqft so a comparable gas heater would be ~$8k and the one on site is a high efficient Bryant model less than 3 years old. Plus we are having a gas line run to the house b/c there are incentives currently and we want to plumb it in before closing up the walls.


Heres the big questions:

*Where is the oil tank and whats its condition

*What part of the country is the house located

*whats the total project budget.

*what else is involved in the flip

No matter what my initial thought is to rip it out, but answer these first and that will give me a better idea.

EVERYONE is moving away from oil, and Natural gas is significantly cheaper, so there are good reasons to move towards gas.
 

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*Where is the oil tank and whats its condition - Outside - in good condition (not buried)

*What part of the country is the house located - North East - Valley Forge, PA

*whats the total project budget. ~$125,000

*what else is involved in the flip - everything, kitchen, bath, roof, siding, etc

The house is almost 4k sqft so a comparable gas heater would be ~$8k and the one on site is a high efficient Bryant model less than 3 years old. Plus we are having a gas line run to the house b/c there are incentives currently and we want to plumb it in before closing up the walls.
Okay, Thats a decent budget. and while you don't have to rip it out, I probably still would, and heres my main reason why.

OIL tank liability. Those things are a nightmare, even if they are above ground.

If the oil furnace is fairly new it would probably be a direct swap to a gas furnace, and you almost certainly can reuse the AC if its equipped. Also you can usually sell the oil back to the oil company, and you can craigslist the furnace to recoup a bit more money. I dont know if you are doing the work on the reno, but Ive changed a furnace before, and its way easier than it seems.

I've used this site before for direct to consumer HVAC equipment

https://www.alpinehomeair.com/

Ive had great luck with them, and they have great prices. I have no idea what the capacity of the furnace you are looking at is but heres a high efficiency builders grade unit 120k btu for a grand

https://www.alpinehomeair.com/viewproduct.cfm?productID=453075208

IMO getting rid of the oil furnace now could just save you time and aggravation at the time of sale, and a new furnace is always an asset in cold climates, even if the existing one is relatively new. Yeah you will probably sell it just fine with the oil furnace, but I wouldnt be surprised if you could add another 10k on the sell price by switching it over to gas.

My brother lives around valley forge, and his place had oil when he first moved in. 10 year old unit that was okay, but still cost them over $600 a month during some cold months just to keep it 68 or under, and that was on a place around 2400 sqft. he said he would never do it again.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All very valid points. I think at this point we are going to wait until the end of the reno to make the call. Depending on budget we will make the call, it's something we can do at the last minute if necessary.


Okay, Thats a decent budget. and while you don't have to rip it out, I probably still would, and heres my main reason why.

OIL tank liability. Those things are a nightmare, even if they are above ground.

If the oil furnace is fairly new it would probably be a direct swap to a gas furnace, and you almost certainly can reuse the AC if its equipped. Also you can usually sell the oil back to the oil company, and you can craigslist the furnace to recoup a bit more money. I dont know if you are doing the work on the reno, but Ive changed a furnace before, and its way easier than it seems.

I've used this site before for direct to consumer HVAC equipment

https://www.alpinehomeair.com/

Ive had great luck with them, and they have great prices. I have no idea what the capacity of the furnace you are looking at is but heres a high efficiency builders grade unit 120k btu for a grand

https://www.alpinehomeair.com/viewproduct.cfm?productID=453075208

IMO getting rid of the oil furnace now could just save you time and aggravation at the time of sale, and a new furnace is always an asset in cold climates, even if the existing one is relatively new. Yeah you will probably sell it just fine with the oil furnace, but I wouldnt be surprised if you could add another 10k on the sell price by switching it over to gas.

My brother lives around valley forge, and his place had oil when he first moved in. 10 year old unit that was okay, but still cost them over $600 a month during some cold months just to keep it 68 or under, and that was on a place around 2400 sqft. he said he would never do it again.
 
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