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2013 Audi A3 TDI
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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Out of the options you outlined (thanks!), given that I’ll be lowering the car to approximately TT level with the Eibach springs, which way would you recommend? Keeping it stock is obviously still an option, but I’m not opposed to changing /upgrading some of the parts if they’ll have near oem reliability (or better). I’m leaning towards just keeping it stock for now as there probably isn’t a huge benefit to a sort of “GT” Highway flyer to change the geometry much.
 

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I had the aluminum passat arms and superpro ball joints and it was a pretty good combo for a slight upgrade over stock. I have tubular now, but it rides harsher because the bushings are all replaced with spherical bearings for that type of setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
So I decided to stay simple. Good thing as I’ve spent more hours than I’d like to admit installing a single (drivers side) strut. I’ve replaced everything in that strut assembly: spring, damper, top hat, bearing, (shorter) bump stop and dust boot. I am reusing the hardware, though.

Removal was more of a pain than I expected, and there was no wiggling to be done that could simply let it drop off. Ultimately, I used the “2x4” method and also a C clamp to push the strut out. I did not remove the axle bolt, but I do see why that is a recommended procedure.

Anyway, single koni FSD strut + Eibach pro spring (and TT top mount) installed.

Tire Automotive tire Wheel Vehicle brake Motor vehicle
 

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Replace the hardware. The nuts that hold the top of the strut to the strut tower might be okay, but you only have one bolt with a nut holding the knuckle / spindle to the strut, and it's a stretch bolt. That means once you remove it, the bolt will not hold the same amount of torque once reinstalled. You're probably okay for a little while, but you really should replace it for safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks npace. I’ll get those on order.

Finished the install today and took for a short test drive. Results? Not significant, honestly. Definitely slightly lower, which I don’t really care that much about. Do need to be more careful about dragging the bumper on stuff. I could maybe convince myself that things corner flatter and all that, but it is not a dramatic change. I’ll be in the car for a few hours tomorrow, and hope to get a better feel for it, then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
So I’ve been driving it, had the alignment checked, and things seem ok there.
In terms of ride quality, it is interesting to see how these konis ride vs the BC racing covers on a different car, and the stock suspension on both. When many people review suspension upgrades, they put a lot of emphasis on the springs, but it is the dampers which have the vastly more significant impact to the ride.

Oem is very good at being a good Jack of all. Good low speed characteristics, good high speed characteristics, but nothing exceptional.
The BC racing struts have a digressive damping curve, which means the low speed damping is very firm, which felt crappy at speeds below, say, 40mph, but at highway speeds felt really planted and stable (almost like it was intended for racing applications).
The konis have a different and slightly unusual 3 stage damping curve, IIRC. This gives them good low speed characteristics (similar to oem), but at the higher speed regimes with faster impacts, they stiffen up. Konis prioritize rebound damping apparently, which presents itself as a bit of a harsh feeling on the back side of bumps, like the wheel doesn’t follow the road back down as easily, so the body of the car drops more quickly, which you feel s as a bit of a jerking sensation in the seat. This is with me going 80+ over bad highway heaves and the like. It behaves very well on compression events, though.
Overall, the car does feel more “sporty”, and I think I’m done with the handling mods for a while. I’m skirting the line of what my highway Flyer should be, and I really have no desire to venture into auto cross territory.
At the end of the day, I think the konis and springs were probably the least bang for the buck improvement, while rear sway bar and then firmer bushings were the most. Good tires are also key.

On a side note, I’ve been filling up exclusively with the 76 fuel station R95 biodiesel and it’s been great. Consistently between 38 and 41 mpg at borderline (but not quite) irresponsible highway speeds, and things are running smooth and good while using a significantly more renewable resource with a much lower carbon foot print.

it’s being a good and fun commuter. Nothing else really planned until the extended warranty is up, and then it is all about the engine and dsg tunes. I was thinking bigger turbo, but with how I am driving it now, even just the tune is pretty unnecessary, and mostly just for off idle throttle response and better mpg.

thanks for feedback to things earlier in the thread, folks.
 

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2013 Audi A3 2.0Tq 2013 Audi TT-S
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I'm pretty sure you cannot change any steering values with VCDS on a 2013 car. I think only 06-07 cars have that setting adjustable. Neither my 08 or 13 A3 could be adjusted. Only thing you can adjust on cars newer than 07 is the "dymanic steering suggestion" thing which is an incredibly subtle/weak nudge the car is supposed to give you to turn the wheel opposite when it starts to under or oversteer. But you can't change the boost values on anything but the oldest A3s.

One thing you can do with VCDS is enable XDS, which I really recommend you do--it does make a difference. You can also enable the indirect TPMS if you don't have it but I believe all US market cars have that as it was mandated there at some point in time. And of course the other standard/usual "VAG-COM tricks".

As for suspension, I'm on KW V1s...it's the one mod I did which to some degree I wish I hadn't. Too harsh, though maybe that's 'cause I'm "old" now lol. However the car looks dopey at stock ride height, so being able to lower (in the summer months anyway) makes it look much nicer. I do raise it back to stock height in the winter, though the rear with KWs is bascially always low--even at the highest setting, it's low at the rear.
 
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